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Duct Taper
02-15-2005, 03:36 PM
If you ever go and buy a cherry picker engine hoist that is rated for 2 Tons, don't believe it. Even if it is painted a pretty Chinese Red. I set mine for 1 1/2 Tons (3000#) and went to lift my Bridgeport (2500#). Not. As the slack was taken up and the hoist started to creak and the boom started to flex and the mill did not move I decided to back off and check the hoist for bending. I couldn't see any permanent bending but when I tried to fold up the legs I discovered that a couple of the swivel casters had taken a perma-squat position! The hoist may have eventually moved the mill, or maybe not, but the casters were pure China Syndrome and gave way under the stress.

I think the USA manufacturers usually build to 2X or 3X above the rating, but I guess the Chinese are dyslexic and make it to 1/2X or 1/3X of the rating for actual capacity. At least with the casters.

After that I went back to the tried and true method of putting 1/2" rods under the mill and pushing it bit by bit.

Live and learn and try to escape injury in the process!

Forrest Addy
02-15-2005, 04:13 PM
Just because there's a number on a piece of consumer grade equipment don't think you can take it to the bank.

The first thing I did with the cheapo cherry picker I got was to toss the cheap casters and replace them with some of Faultless' finest. I can wheel a suspended ton around on my rough driveway will little concern except for load control. They are junky but very handy.

IOWOLF
02-15-2005, 04:21 PM
Did you unbolt it from the floor?

Could be metric tons, are they more or less than real tons(2000)pounds.

ibewgypsie
02-15-2005, 05:58 PM
A crack in the floor will take them casters clean off the cherry picker.

Off a home made dolly too.

My black, 2 ton folding cherry picker lifts my bridgeport and it is a cnc.

I noticed it is bent right over where the cylinder ties into the boom thou.

David

Duct Taper
02-15-2005, 06:41 PM
"I noticed it is bent right over where the cylinder ties into the boom thou."

Hey, what's one little ole weak link, eh?

precisionworks
02-15-2005, 07:34 PM
Best prices on high quality, heavy duty casters:

http://clarkcaster.com/ViewCatalog.asp


And if you call, you'll actually speak with a person who knows the answer to your question.

AZSORT
02-15-2005, 08:56 PM
Don't feel bad, I bent a front spindle on my good old heavy '57 Case tractor w/loader when unloading my Bpt.

Greg C

ibewgypsie
02-15-2005, 09:58 PM
That Northern tool lift cost me $199. I have moved over two dozen machines with it.

I think actually the Index machine at the shop bent it. That busted thing weighs more than my bp.

WHen they break, they break more than just the cherry picker sometimes. Be careful.

David

Duct Taper
02-15-2005, 11:07 PM
Gypsie, I think I have the same picker that you got. Not from Northern but looks the same. The casters that went squat are the ones in the middle that carry the front weight when the legs are up for storage. I think I stopped lifting before the boom took a set but I didn't check the ram attachment point. I think I will do that tomorrow though.

Maybe it is time to build a gantry....

wierdscience
02-15-2005, 11:10 PM
Not all cherry pickers are created equal,even in China.

We sell a 2-1/4 ton model that is made from 2-1/2 and 3" x 1/4" wall tubing.The casters are kinpin type,not rivetted,it sells for $220.They also make a 2-1/4 ton which is all 11ga tubing,junk!

With all of that said,I don't like lifting anything heavier than 1500#s with a cherry picker.I have to build another one,but I had a cheap,square tube A-frame that would pick 3 tons comfortably so I could put a dolly or trailer under the load.It comes apart in five pieces each wieghing less than 60#s.

I built three so far,everytime I take one to load out at an auction somebody offers to buy it,if it's over $200,I sell http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Going to a sale thursday,if it goes well I will be welding thursday night http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

hrhoades
02-15-2005, 11:16 PM
The cherry picker I have worked fine for several years than one day the weld that holds the ram decided to snap off. Any one using one to lift anything this heavy should take a good look at any welds on the machine. It can get really exciting when something like this happens.

Too_Many_Tools
02-16-2005, 12:00 AM
"I have to build another one,but I had a cheap,square tube A-frame that would pick 3 tons comfortably so I could put a dolly or trailer under the load.It comes apart in five pieces each wieghing less than 60#s."

Any chance we could see pictures of these A-frames you build?

I would love to see them.

Thanks

TMT

Duct Taper
02-16-2005, 06:53 AM
Ditto!

dsergison
02-16-2005, 10:16 AM
tri-tto

Rustybolt
02-16-2005, 10:24 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:
Not all cherry pickers are created equal,even in China.

We sell a 2-1/4 ton model that is made from 2-1/2 and 3" x 1/4" wall tubing.The casters are kinpin type,not rivetted,it sells for $220.They also make a 2-1/4 ton which is all 11ga tubing,junk!

With all of that said,I don't like lifting anything heavier than 1500#s with a cherry picker.I have to build another one,but I had a cheap,square tube A-frame that would pick 3 tons comfortably so I could put a dolly or trailer under the load.It comes apart in five pieces each wieghing less than 60#s.

I built three so far,everytime I take one to load out at an auction somebody offers to buy it,if it's over $200,I sell http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Going to a sale thursday,if it goes well I will be welding thursday night http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif</font>

Wierd. Do you have any dimeensions or drawings of your A frame? I'm looking for something I can take apart and store.

Duct Taper
02-16-2005, 02:00 PM
I know an old swing set with the legs connected across the bottom would probably do for the side "A" frames, but the cross bar would have to be much more. Like maybe a 4" or 6" I-Beam about 8' long?

ibewgypsie
02-16-2005, 02:13 PM
Thin tubing only is strong if it is put together in a manner as to not compromise it's dimensional strength or wall shape.

I read the above statement about building race car chassis from DOM Thinwall Chrome moly tubing. It involved statements about not using a mandrel bender.

If the lower legs are able to "walk out of square" with the rest of the a-frame it will fail.

A common 2x4 perfectly vertical and reinforced properly can hold tons. I have seen this.

We have a A-frame at the shop made from thin wall tubing, I put swivel casters on it. Afterthought it reduced the capacity of the Aframe by 50% or more. It allows the lower legs not be perfectly stationary while lifting. While anchored in the dirt, it has suspended over 1 ton. On rollers I do not trust it more than 600 pounds. In afterthought I screwed it up.

All the new cars, all engineered in strength using thin materiels. One car crash that bends the body-frame metal, and it has lost all it's intergrity in shape-strength. OR some rust. Planned obselesence.

I too am interesting in a Light portable lift, I also look at all aspects. Treat each lift like it is a life threatening event, it is.

I have one here, made from a 26' 18" Ibeam, it is rated 3 tons, braced all to heck. I am fixing to cut it down to about 14'. It's rating should increase by double.

Cheers.. I am done with the itchy fiberglass insulation here in the addition..

------------------
David Cofer, Of:
Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

3 Phase Lightbulb
02-16-2005, 05:18 PM
When I bought my bridgeport, I hired a local construction company to come down to my house with a front-end loader. We slung chain around the ram/base and hooked it onto the bucket and he lifted the bridgeport right off my truck, and set it down gently right in front of my garage doors on a 4x8 sheet of plywood. The front-end loader then lowered his bucket and gently pushed the bridgeport into my garage (it slid nicely on the 4x8 sheet of ply completely inside my garage). I also had the same guy move my Clausing 14x48" Lathe inside my garage too.

-3Ph

hamerhead74000
02-19-2005, 04:10 AM
I have a Shizouka AN-S cnc knee mill... I don't know exactly how much it weighs, but when we were loading it onto the truck to bring it home, it started to tip the forklift over (4500lb capacity Toyota forklift that the guy I bought it from had in his shop for moving equipment around) -- it was only through the skill of the shop forman (who was driving the forklift) that it didn't end in disaster! When we finally got it home, we went and rented a Gradall off-road forklift (the kind with a boom-arm; I think it was a 10,000lb capacity unit, if I remember right?) Next time I have to move something this heavy, I'm going to get the big forklift for both ends of the move 8-)

NLAP
02-19-2005, 05:53 PM
I have moved a few bridgeports in my life. One the way you just explained, rolling on bars...the best experience was by lift truck....this bridgeport was already standing on blocks of wood (4X4' I believe) all you really needed was a bit off the ground and it was easy...However some of the shorter people at work did not like the idea of the added inches to the height of the machine....but lifting by hoist or from the top i think can be dangerous because the top heaviness of the machine and awkward weight distribution makes it hard to move this way, in my opinion
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Duct Taper:
If you ever go and buy a cherry picker engine hoist that is rated for 2 Tons, don't believe it. Even if it is painted a pretty Chinese Red. I set mine for 1 1/2 Tons (3000#) and went to lift my Bridgeport (2500#). Not. As the slack was taken up and the hoist started to creak and the boom started to flex and the mill did not move I decided to back off and check the hoist for bending. I couldn't see any permanent bending but when I tried to fold up the legs I discovered that a couple of the swivel casters had taken a perma-squat position! The hoist may have eventually moved the mill, or maybe not, but the casters were pure China Syndrome and gave way under the stress.

I think the USA manufacturers usually build to 2X or 3X above the rating, but I guess the Chinese are dyslexic and make it to 1/2X or 1/3X of the rating for actual capacity. At least with the casters.

After that I went back to the tried and true method of putting 1/2" rods under the mill and pushing it bit by bit.

Live and learn and try to escape injury in the process!</font>