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darryl
02-21-2005, 11:04 PM
I read in one of my metalworking texts about stellite being one of the improved materials for cutting bits. Then I read about valves in another thread. I take a valve to the cut off disc, and it grinds like hss, dark sparks and all. I know that many valves are stellite. Flick! Light bulb comes on, and there I go- I see a variety of different cutting tools being ground from valves. How sick am I? And how do I tell what a particular valve is made from?

J. Randall
02-22-2005, 12:51 AM
Darryl, although I don't know how to identify them some valves were sodium filled and could be dangerous if you cut into them, be careful. James

CCWKen
02-22-2005, 01:21 AM
Stellite is a brand name. All new valves are made with it or a similar compound. I ran out to the barn a while ago to check a few. I was thinking you could tell by the casting marks on the underside of the head or on the head. But... that wasn't the case. I have some chrome and Stellite valves but I couldn't see any difference. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gif

James is correct about the "old" valves. I don't think sodium is used any longer. It kept blowing up re-melt furnaces and burning dumps.

Evan
02-22-2005, 02:11 AM
Sodium filled valves are still widely used.

darryl
02-22-2005, 02:51 AM
Hmm, I forgot about the sodium filled ones, good point about the safety factor.
When I scrounged up a cylinder head to use for the base of my Unimat, I ended up with a pile of valves and springs, also some hardened washers. Sometimes this stuff seems to be begging to get used for something. I found one in the kitchen the other day, but I can't remember what I might have been doing with it. I think I'll make up a boring bar out of one stem, and see how well the cutting edge holds up. Some of my very small bars are drill rod, so I'll have a chance to make a comparison.

bob308
02-22-2005, 07:33 AM
if the stems are worn then they are junk. i do weld the faces up on the old j-d . the guides you either bronze wall them or you replace them.

wierdscience
02-22-2005, 11:00 PM
Stellite is like carbide,there are different grades.I have seen tools made from them,but carbide is too cheap these days.

I have also seen jewelry made from stellite valves and seats.My brother worked for IH as a mechanic,they had some folks,Vietnamese I think who bought all their old valves to cut up for jewlrey.

Automach
02-23-2005, 01:46 AM
The entire valve is not made of stellite.The stellite is spray welded to the face of the valve and is only maybe .015-.030 thick.However the stellite seats would be of a solid material.But could very possibly be an alloy mix.The proper way of disposing of sodiom filled valves is to bury them. Do not mix in with scrap iron.I've heard a couple horror tales about them.

darryl
02-24-2005, 03:17 AM
Hmmm, I wonder what's the likely scenario if I did grind into a pocket of sodium in a valve? Would it begin to burn or create killer gas, or squirt out under high pressure and burn me, then cause uncurable skin lesions, etc. I know little about sodium, except that I eat some of it every day, at least a chloride of it.
Anyway, I have more to be busy with right now than grinding up old valves.

Paul Alciatore
02-24-2005, 03:41 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by darryl:
Hmmm, I wonder what's the likely scenario if I did grind into a pocket of sodium in a valve? Would it begin to burn or create killer gas, or squirt out under high pressure and burn me, then cause uncurable skin lesions, etc. I know little about sodium, except that I eat some of it every day, at least a chloride of it.
Anyway, I have more to be busy with right now than grinding up old valves.</font>

Sodium and Chlorine are two highly reactive, very dangerous, poisonus elements. In each case it is likely due to their high reaction rates. But when they are combined in sodium chloride, aka common table salt, they are so involved with reacting with each other that they are rendered almost totally harmless. But enough stray reactivity left there to increase the rusting and other corrosive processes. One of the many strange things in chemistry.

Paul A.

darryl
02-25-2005, 02:08 AM
I was going to make a joke about having a container of bleach handy to quench a potentially sodium filled valve if it happened to go on fire, but then I erased all that part.
There are certainly many strange things going on with chemistry. Makes me wish I paid more attention to chem in high school.
I've been amazed at the potential disaster involving chemicals right in our own homes. Bleach and ammonia are almost always put side by side under the kitchen sink- try mixing those two together, NO, DONT! Flame and fuels is another one. It's amazing that more homes aren't blown up by some accident with propane or other gaseous fuels, considering the multiple sources of ignition in the home. And then there's the grinder- people happily grinding away at something (sodium filled valves, maybe) and the shower of sparks spraying away onto your pants, the wooden benchtop, into the can of solvent, onto the powdered aluminum---

mattc
02-25-2005, 02:40 AM
409 and spick and span when mixed will self ignite when they dry or so I have been told

Matt in AK