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View Full Version : Drill bit sharpening, need illustration



Albert J. Hoch
02-28-2005, 11:08 AM
I'm trying to find information on drill bit nomenclature. The chisel tip, the web, etc. I think I can rig a simple sharpening jig with a bit of angle iron but I'd like to get specific information. I've been sharpening my bits by hand (on the grinder) and they do cut but know I can do better. :-)

Where can I find an illustration, with nomenclature, of drill bits?

Sincerely
Albert J. Hoch Jr.

jburstein
02-28-2005, 11:16 AM
this has some diagrams and other info about drill bits.

http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/cutting_tools_twist_drill.html

hope that helps,

-Justin

Albert J. Hoch
02-28-2005, 01:27 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jburstein:
this has some diagrams and other info about drill bits.

http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/cutting_tools_twist_drill.html

hope that helps,

-Justin</font>

On the money! Just what I was seeking.
Thanks very much. :-)
Sincerely
Albert J. Hoch Jr.

precisionworks
02-28-2005, 03:49 PM
Albert,

Have you ever thought about buying a Drill Doctor? Had mine almost two years & just replaced the diamond wheel for the first time. It's fast, consistent, accurate & not too expensive. I bought mine from Enco & they are currently on sale:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=890-9007&PMPXNO=3907119&PARTPG=INLMK3

This model sharpens from 3/32" up to 3/4".

------------------
Barry Milton

pgmrdan
02-28-2005, 05:48 PM
After the discussion earlier about breaking in a new bandsaw blade, can anyone tell me how to break in new drills? I've got a boat load of new drills I've been wanting to break in so I can start using them. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

jburstein
02-28-2005, 06:06 PM
well there are number of ways to go about that. For best results I'd get some hardened steel and run the drill up the the fastest your machine can run, then feed it into the steel as fast as you can.

oh...you say you wanted to break it IN, not just break it?

Sorry can't help you with that 'un.

-Justin

mochinist
02-28-2005, 06:51 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by pgmrdan:
After the discussion earlier about breaking in a new bandsaw blade, can anyone tell me how to break in new drills? I've got a boat load of new drills I've been wanting to break in so I can start using them. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif</font>

Stick in your ass and give it a few good turns.

Your Old Dog
02-28-2005, 07:12 PM
Mochinist, I do believe you're right. That's how you break in cutting edges that do not come to a point if you feel the need to break them in at all http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

I not only concur with your answer but applaud you on your restraint and civility in presenting your advice! If drill bits came to points like bandsaw blades and engraving chisels then your advice would have been incorrect, not to mention, painful.

precisionworks
02-28-2005, 07:46 PM
Be gentle & consider the source...--------------------------------------------
pgmrdan posted 02-18-2005

I know my blade is 'broke in' when it's dull.
A blade doesn't require breaking in. In fact, I've never heard of breaking in any cutting tool whether metal working or wood working, unless you consider 'sharpening' breaking in. Just use it.
--------------------------------------------
Some of the 'break in' information here sounds more like deburring because the manufacturers are too cheap to do it themselves.
--------------------------------------------
Are you guys really serious? I came back to see what was added after about 2 days. I'm having a hard time believing you guys are seious with this topic.
Do you break in your hacksaw blades? How about your hammers and screwdrivers? Should I use a new punch on aluminum the first few time to burnish the point before I use it on steel?

--------------------------------------------
He is serious, certainly, about new drill break in. Mochinist, what you described is "new drill break off"!!!

pgmrdan
02-28-2005, 08:25 PM
"He is serious, certainly, about new drill break in."

Yeah, right! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

"Stick in your ass and give it a few good turns."

Like a human Drill Doctor? If I tried that they'd come out like freshly sharpened pencils. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

rangerod
02-28-2005, 08:44 PM
Breaking in bandsaw blades is recommended. We had the DoAll rep come in the shop & he stated that you should back off the cutting force approx 1/3 for a few cuts then go to town. Maybe bull**** but he is the expert & why tell us something that would make the blades last longer, which they are now?

pgmrdan
03-01-2005, 08:04 AM
I'm just having some fun with some of you newer guys.

Initially I was surprised but I believe the recommendations about breaking in a bandsaw blade. When I first saw the thread I was thinking some people are just a little bit too anal retentive. For a minute I thought I was on a woodworking forum. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Albert, there was a good article about a year or so ago on using one of the old style Craftsman drill sharpeners. I think General still makes the sharpener.

I've heard mixed results on using a Drill Doctor. Some people love 'em, some hate 'em.

As far as the geometry of a drill bit you might look at one of the Workshop Practice Series books that cover Drills, Taps, and Dies. It might be by Tubal Cain.

Hope this helps.

Oh, and some of you other guys need to lighten up. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

gglines
03-01-2005, 07:55 PM
I spoke with a blade manufacturing rep once and he confirmed that bandsaw blades will last much longer if you break them in by cutting up some scrap aluminum.

FWIW, I've never seen a test article on this but have heard it from multiple sources.

George