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View Full Version : Has the smoke cleared? More ladies in the shop!



egpace
03-06-2005, 09:54 PM
And now for something completely different...

Canadian women in the machine shop

Now remember everone, BE NICE! Big Sister is watching.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/egpace/machinist/ladies.jpg


Image from the Canada Science and Technology Museum

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/aviation/index_in.cfm?id=128&index=1

ricksplace
03-06-2005, 10:03 PM
I heard about this shop. They had to wear badges with their IQ on them.

spope14
03-06-2005, 10:16 PM
Women or not, this is a great "safety Poster Child" shot.

1. No safety glasses
2. Rings on th fingers
3. Hands in the work area
4. More than one person operating the handles on a machine.
5. Long hair unrestrained.

Now if the machine were actually running......

Dave Opincarne
03-06-2005, 10:27 PM
No problem here. But I only see one person working the machine, the other seems to only be holding a mic. How many guys take off their wedding rings at work?

speedy
03-06-2005, 10:49 PM
Why do women always feel the need to do things together?? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Ken

RPease
03-06-2005, 11:53 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by spope14:
[B]Women or not, this is a great "safety Poster Child" shot.

1. No safety glasses
2. Rings on th fingers
3. Hands in the work area
4. More than one person operating the handles on a machine.
5. Long hair unrestrained.

</font>

Obviously they "both" have a micrometer, but ignoring the fact that it is an "old" photo, since when do you need safety glasses to measure the diameter of a part on the lathe?

Ring on finger.........what indication is there that they are "operating the lathe". They might be inspectors.

Hands in the work area......how else would they measure the part in place?

More than one person operating the handles. My eyes are bad, but not that bad. I see "one hand" on "one handled wheel".

Long hair unrestrained.....Again, maybe they're inspectors. Machine doesn't appear to be running. Maybe it's unplugged. No evidence to indicate that it is unsafe.

JMHO........

larry_g
03-06-2005, 11:53 PM
Hey Speedy
Ya ever see them Harley riders? They are like a bunch wimmin going to the bathroom, always in groups.
lg

Jim Luck
03-07-2005, 12:11 AM
How come I never had the chance to assist a lady on a lathe!. Sure would make my day, especially the one on the left!!! ---

[This message has been edited by Jim Luck (edited 03-06-2005).]

Rich Carlstedt
03-07-2005, 12:33 AM
You guys must have led a sheltered Life !
My father-in-law was a Tool and Die Maker.
He raised his oldest daughter in his home shop.
She ran all the tools, and safely too, since he was the shop Safety Man and Apprentice trainer at work.
When I found her, I married her. Best dam thing I have ever done in my life.
She knows the lingo, and helps out when I need a third hand
When I need a tool, no problem, in fact she is always telling me to buy what I need for the shop.
You are missing out on a great opportunity !
My daughter fixes her own cars, and in college, she had to help her boyfriends when
Clutches and Master cylinders failed (read she DID it )

rsr911
03-07-2005, 12:36 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Dave Opincarne:
No problem here. But I only see one person working the machine, the other seems to only be holding a mic. How many guys take off their wedding rings at work? </font>

I do how else will I appear single! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif J/K really I do take it off around hazardous chemicals and machinery, in fact I often leave it at home. My wife knows I'm married and that's all that matters.



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-Christian D. Sokolowski

ARFF79
03-07-2005, 01:50 AM
Wedding what wedding ring? After I left it in the toolbox one night and caught all get out for it(been married 6 months at the time), I just left it at home and only wore it when we went out. Even stopped that after a bit. I do not even think I could get it on my finger now. She knows I don't stray and doesn't mind that its not there to stake her claim. Know a lot of electricians that don't wear theirs either for similar reasons.

speedy
03-07-2005, 05:56 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by larry_g:
Hey Speedy
Ya ever see them Harley riders? They are like a bunch wimmin going to the bathroom, always in groups.
lg</font>

Yeah Larry, a lot like hot rodders at an annual run? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

cheers, Ken

IOWOLF
03-07-2005, 07:41 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by RPease:
Obviously they "both" have a micrometer, but ignoring the fact that it is an "old" photo, since when do you need safety glasses to measure the diameter of a part on the lathe?

Ring on finger.........what indication is there that they are "operating the lathe". They might be inspectors.

Hands in the work area......how else would they measure the part in place?

More than one person operating the handles. My eyes are bad, but not that bad. I see "one hand" on "one handled wheel".

Long hair unrestrained.....Again, maybe they're inspectors. Machine doesn't appear to be running. Maybe it's unplugged. No evidence to indicate that it is unsafe.

JMHO........</font>

Any time you are in a shop you should have safety glasses on.

IOWOLF
03-07-2005, 08:20 AM
Oh and I cant beleive some one hasn't told us the brand,model, and year of the lathe.

topct
03-07-2005, 09:55 AM
Lovely example of a 9" South bend. Probably a little 20 incher. Just like mine. And these ladies would be more than welcome to run it.

As far as the year I'm going to guess early forties. I think I can see the top of a hex bolt for the headstock bearing.



[This message has been edited by topct (edited 03-07-2005).]

JCHannum
03-07-2005, 10:52 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by topct:
Probably a little 20 incher. Just like mine. And these ladies would be more than welcome to run it.
[This message has been edited by topct (edited 03-07-2005).]</font>

Ah geeze Louise here we go again.

JRouche
03-07-2005, 11:53 AM
Nice O'l timey photo. Keep the historical pictures coming.

Appears to me these are women part of the women's rights movement (WRM-1813), go girls, oops, I mean women http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

I love-em all. JRouche

Forrest Addy
03-07-2005, 11:59 AM
I worked with women in the shop much of my career and trained many women apprentices. Once you get the stupid misplaced gallantry out of the way and start treating them as fellow workers women can be very satisfactory partners in the workplace. Many times I've been glad to have their smaller stature (reach in there and fetch out that T nut I dropped) and different outlook (why couldn't we set it up like this).

You soon learn not to romance your fellow workers. It's like dating your sister. While a couple of romances blossomed few of the dozens of women working on the shop floor entered into relationships with their crew members.

Being women they tend to spoil undeserving men (like me) fetching them cookies and dragging them home for dinner with their families to meet their female cousins.

There's a few women apprentices that turned out to be real duds - about the same proportion as the men apprentices. And there's a few who applied themselves and aggressively met the challenges of the trade becoming top hands. In the middle were those who while not spectacularly talented became damn good workers.

I recall Annie, a 5 ft 2" slim pretty apprentice who was also quite an athlete. She was too light to wrench up on the larger machines so she kept a pipe cheater on hand for leverage. She used to jump off the carriage of a 60" lathe to get one more lunge on the cheater. The faceplate jaws weighed about 60 lb, over half her weight. She used the crane to set them on top of the headstock and using to a step stool and plank she could muscle the jaws at her waist height into place on the faceplate. She adapted. She could change the jaws as quick as I could.

Once a bunch of older hands were gathered to moan about the trade and what it was coming to with the women who were coming into the shop. Bill Polhamus summed it up. "They're women. They're too weak. They can't handle the heavy work."

Annie happened by and heard this. "Too weak, huh?" And she grabbed the hand-line on the end of the jib crane boom and climbed it hand over hand up 16 ft and slapped the top of the boom sending dust flying. She let go dropped the full distance landing like a cat. "Let's see you flabby old fu**s do that!" and she stalked off.

The silence was deafening and not one of those old couch potatos dared to look at the hand-line Annie climbed. She shamed them and they deserved it.

[This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 03-07-2005).]

Jpfalt
03-07-2005, 01:00 PM
One thing is obvious from the photo. It was a staged publicity shot. It reflects reality almost as well as this years Echo chainsaw catalog... If you look close there are a couple of saws set up by the marketing department with the chain on backwards. I can just hear the publicity flak coaching" ...each grab a measuring thingy, put your hand up where we can see it on that adjustment thingy and LOOK REALLY INTERESTED!!!" The lighting in the photo was professionally done and who ever heard of using an OD mic on a DC motor armature journal to adjust the dead center on a tailstock. Also looks like the girl on the right is thinking, "Once this idiot is gone we can get back to work."

Back to the photo, in 1940 very few in the shop wore safety glasses and the only thing mentioning not wearing rings was the South Bend "How To Run a Lathe", but then it also said to tuck your tie in between the upper and second buttons on the front of your shirt to avoid stranglings.

topct
03-07-2005, 01:09 PM
Jp, first the one lady is actually holding the mic in a very proper way. The other has positioned hers to show the reading to the other lady( she might be an intructor)?

Also she is not adjusting the dead center. She is maybe backing it away from the work to get the mic into a better position.

If the picture was staged, so be it. It portrays the situation and that's all that matters

------------------
Gene

spope14
03-07-2005, 08:56 PM
Oh for cripes sake.....

But back to business, you should wear safety glasses at any time in a shop - as mentioned. Yes, I wear them to mic a pat, mine are the good old prescrips with the bifocals - so I am blind without them ;-). I have not worn my wedding ring ever in the shop. The biggest injury to fingers involving rings is not the good old chip tangling around the ring and mysteriously ripping your finger off... The biggest thing is lifting items such as vises, plates, or even little things that tend to catch on other things. The big or small items catch under your ring, leverage it a bit, and dislocate your finger - which is amazingly easy to do..... Been there, done that while doing a bit of carpentry while my wedding ring was new a scant 15 years back. Caught on a nail sticking a bit out of the wood, dislocation YEOWWWWWWW. Found out tnis is the most common type of thing, this or a plate or vise slips in the hands, and yeowww.

But back to the pic...Of course it is staged!!!! Sorry i posted that first one in retrospect.

KyMike
03-08-2005, 12:33 AM
I have always been a bit puzzled by those warnings in old shop books about tucking your necktie in. Why would anyone put on a tie to work in a machine shop to begin with?
Mike

IOWOLF
03-08-2005, 11:57 AM
In the old days men wore ties and women wore skirts, this is how it was done. but this was b4 my time.

spope14
03-08-2005, 02:58 PM
The Woodward Governor Company had their machinists and all personnel wear neckties from the start through the mid 80's and even later. The machinists wore clip on bow ties thankfully.

For the first twelve years teraching, neckties were mandatory for all teaching staff, no execptions. I wore one under a shop apron and had a tie tac in or a tie bar on it.

matador
03-08-2005, 11:06 PM
thanks for the link,egpace.the other photo's DO show women wearing safety gear,and look more like working photo's.the wing sewing is very interesting.Tiger Moth wings?

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Hans