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bspooh
03-17-2005, 03:02 PM
I am not a welder by any means. But, I need to weld thin Wall tubing(approx 2 1/8 od by 2" id) to a 5/8 diam tube..

So I think arc welding would be too hot, so I am thinking mig welding...

problem is that I don't have a welder..So is there a good quality welder for under $500.00??? I have never shopped for one..I don't want to use Ebay, brand new would be fine...

thank,s
Brent

Joel
03-17-2005, 03:15 PM
I doubt that they have any left, but you could try Tractor Supply for one heck of a deal:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Forum1/HTML/010141.html

Take a look at Hobart and Lincoln, they both make good machines for the money. The Home Depot sells the smaller Lincoln for a decent price, but I would sure try and get a 150-185 amp machine if possible. Otherwise you will be really limited in thickness, regardless of what manufacturers sometimes claim.

If you want to weld with solid (not flux cored) wire, it is cheaper to get a welder that comes with all of the parts included. HF sells a 20cf bottle for $65 last time I looked.

bspooh
03-17-2005, 03:30 PM
So is going to home depot an option? I am really clueless here..I know the cheaper I go then the more limitations that I'll have..Is the "amp ratings" relative to what size or thickness that your able to weld?

I will probably have to go visit a welding supply house so I can get a little educated..

thanks,
Brent

precisionworks
03-17-2005, 03:52 PM
This forum will answer many of your questions: http://www.hobartwelders.com/mboard/

IMO, the best place to shop for a new welder is your local welding store. In the Salt Lake City area are:

Airgas
3415 South 700 West, Salt Lake City

ESAB Welding & Cutting Products
1861 South 4800 West, Salt Lake City

Praxair - Industrial
1884 South 300 East, Salt Lake City

Stop by all three stores, tell them you're new at this and ask them to demonstrate what they recommend. You'll find their prices are only slightly higher than the internet & you have a place for gas, wire, gloves, etc. You'll forget about the price difference whenever you need help with the machine, getting replacement contact tips, gettting your bottle filled, etc.

Rex
03-17-2005, 03:58 PM
There's a guy on ebay selling new Hobart 125s for $351. That's a good deal on exactly what I need.

3 Phase Lightbulb
03-18-2005, 11:51 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bspooh:
I am not a welder by any means. But, I need to weld thin Wall tubing(approx 2 1/8 od by 2" id) to a 5/8 diam tube..

So I think arc welding would be too hot, so I am thinking mig welding...

problem is that I don't have a welder..So is there a good quality welder for under $500.00??? I have never shopped for one..I don't want to use Ebay, brand new would be fine...

thank,s
Brent</font>

You might want to try brazing... I could not believe how strong brazing the end of a pipe (1/8" wall) 1" ID/ 1.25" OD to a steel plate (1/16") was...I did bevel the end of the pipe before brazing it to the 1/16" plate. Either Brazing or O/A welding might be the way to go, and for $500, you can get a really nice O/A setup...

-3Ph

bspooh
03-18-2005, 12:06 PM
Well I bit the bullet..I went to my local welding supplier and I bought a Miller 210 mig welder...

It will be delivered on Monday..I don't know how to use it yet, but I'm sure I will be doing a lot of trial and errors, and errors, and errors http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif...

I decided to go with the gas instead of the flux-core..I am going to start out with .030 wire...I sure hope it comes with a very informative manual...eek!

thanks all,
brent

mattc
03-18-2005, 12:33 PM
nice choice of machine,
trial and error is how I learned to weld, the manual will help with basic setup, how to setup the wire, adjusting the regulator and the like,
does that machine come with a helmet if not you will need one
also if you have a friend who knows how to weld see if they can stop by and give you a few pointers it is amazing how helpful people can be for a beer

good luck and enjoy to new welder
Matt in AK

ulav8r
03-18-2005, 12:36 PM
Mig is very easy to learn and use. Hardest part for a beginner is usually getting the correct amperage and wire speed. Nest thing to learn is to recognize a good weld as you make it. You have to look for melting of the base metals and recognize proper penetration.

Incorrect amperage and wire speed can cause sticking wire, burn back, burn through, not enough penetration, etc. You have to learn what a good weld looks like versus a good bead. Once set up and tried, come back with more questions.

3 Phase Lightbulb
03-18-2005, 01:00 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bspooh:
Well I bit the bullet..I went to my local welding supplier and I bought a Miller 210 mig welder...

It will be delivered on Monday..I don't know how to use it yet, but I'm sure I will be doing a lot of trial and errors, and errors, and errors http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif...

I decided to go with the gas instead of the flux-core..I am going to start out with .030 wire...I sure hope it comes with a very informative manual...eek!

thanks all,
brent</font>

I have the same MIG welder (Millermatic 210) w/80CF C25 (75%/25%) mix.. I bought mine a month or two ago and I haven't even unpacked it. It's just sitting in my garage waiting for me to try it out. I'll fire my Miller 210 up when spring arives and it warms up a little. I've heard nothing but great things about the Miller 210.. I can't wait to try it out myself.. Let me know how things go when you fire yours up!!

-3Ph

precisionworks
03-18-2005, 01:26 PM
Brent,

Good choice on the 210 Millermatic. Also smart thinking to go with shielding gas instead of flux-core -- FC wire is expensive and produces huge volumes of smoke.

FMA has some good books online https://www.thefabricator.com/FMAstore/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id=14 and they also publish one of the best bimonthly magazines, Practical Welding Today. You can subscribe or read online articles at http://www.thefabricator.com/PWT/PWT.htm . If you subscribe, you'll need to enter "business information", etc.

------------------
Barry Milton

Rex
03-18-2005, 04:49 PM
I also started with .030 wire when I first bought a MIG about 8 years ago. After several uses with mediocre results, I bought some .023 wire. I found it much easier to use, especially on thin stuff like you are using.

PSD KEN
03-18-2005, 09:20 PM
.023 should do it.
Good choice for a welder, I have a Lincoln 175+.From there to the 200A's is a quantum leap, price-wise.
When you have a nice bead going, will sound like bacon frying, at higher amps, damn thick bacon.

psomero
03-18-2005, 10:41 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by precisionworks:
Praxair</font>

i would STRONGLY advise you avoid this joint like the plague. they overcharge atleast 25% on all machinery and accessories. they wanted $250 for a plain air cooled weldcraft tig torch which i bought from a local-owned shop for i think $89. this is the SAME torch mind you and it wasn't on sale when i bought it too.

also, i got my miller syncrowave 180SD tig machine for $250 less at arcgas, plus a 156 cuft argon tank and a free fill for the price of a 80 cuft tank (they were out of 80's so they gave me the biggest one for the same price), a welding helmet, two pairs of gloves five pounds of 7018 and rg-45 welding rod.

when i was in praxair, those pricks wouldn't even give me the time of day it seemed.

precisionworks
03-19-2005, 01:18 AM
They'll treat you like a king if you bring in half a dozen 330's for exchange, especially if they're Helium mix.

moldmonkey
03-19-2005, 10:24 AM
MIG is fairly easy to learn the basics. Then lots and lots of practice. A autodarkening helmet will save alot of frustration when learning. I learned by just playing around at work. Once I figured out to look at the puddle not the arc my welds got better. Tipping the MIG gun slightly to the side helps to see.

As far as getting the voltage and wire speed at the right combination, the welding should sound like a constant bacon sizzle. Just make test welds on a piece of scrap and play with the settings. I do that every time I start up now. I've had to grind out too many bubbly welds because I forgot to turn on the gas http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif.

I liked the Richard Finch welding books for some practical knowledge.


Good luck, Jon Bohlander


[This message has been edited by moldmonkey (edited 03-19-2005).]