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View Full Version : Honda Recall means welding jobs for many shops



precisionworks
03-29-2005, 10:02 PM
If you have excellent aluminum TIG welding skills you may want to visit nearby Honda motorcycle dealers. Some dealers I've contacted have already found people, others have not. The repair involves about three hours work per frame. Here's the news release from American Honda, Motorcycle Division:

February 04, 2005 -- Honda Recalls 2001-2004 Gold Wing GL1800/1800A for More Frame Cracks

On some Honda Gold Wing 1800/1800A motorcycles, certain frame welds do not meet manufacturing specifications. High loads created when riding on rough road surfaces or through potholes can cause the affected welds to crack. This recall affects the entire Gold Wing 1800 line from 2001-2004. The only 1800s not affected are those that have already been recalled or repaired previously for frame cracks. See the Motorcycle Recalls feature for more details. 34919 units may have been affected.



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Barry Milton

motordoctor
03-30-2005, 01:17 PM
I don't know about other parts of the country but down here in SoCal Honda is requiring a certified TIG weldor do the work. The big question is "certified by who?" but my service manager hasn't been able to answer the question other than to tell me Honda wants only certified weldors making the repairs. Otherwise I would be firing up the old Miller DialArc and making some money instead of disassembling those Wingabagos and sending them off to the welding shop.

precisionworks
03-30-2005, 03:08 PM
The American Welding Society (AWS) is probably the most widely recognized certification agency: http://www.aws.org/certification/certFP.html
In years past this was the most popular way to become a "certified welder".

Today, more and more companies have welding engineers & develop their own welding criteria & specifications. That only requires you to take & pass a weld cert test where your sample welds are examined, x-rayed, etc. You might ask if Honda has such a test available.

If you've done other motorcycle welding work, a referral is valuable. Even a call from a Harley shop helps open the door to do this work.

[This message has been edited by precisionworks (edited 03-30-2005).]

motordoctor
03-30-2005, 04:08 PM
http://www.aws.org/cgi-bin/mwf/topic_show.pl?id=4401 Here's a link about the AWS guys talking about the Honda recall. I think my service manager is getting a kickback from the local welding shop on these. I do all other welding in the shop (aluminum/stainless/low carbon steel/etc.) but he doesn't seem interested in me doing these repairs. Too bad because I could weld those things in about 2.5 hours without removing most of the equipment.
http://shopfloortalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2506&page=1&pp=10
That's a link for more in depth info on the repair if anybody is interested.

ibewgypsie
03-30-2005, 05:59 PM
I wonder if the metal needs proper annealing afterwards.

BY effect, frame being altered by a individual, Liability falls to the person who is doing the alterations. Honda no longer would assume the liability. When you do the work you accept the responsibility.

When you produce a Harley clone from parts, you probably don't want to sell it as a new bike, then you have to provide liability paperwork for any occurance that might happen. Ie: hitting a bus head on in the wrong lane and the widow blames your craftsmanship.

Ain't life confusing? People sue over hot coffee.


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David Cofer, Of:
Tunnel Hill, North Georgia

motordoctor
03-30-2005, 06:54 PM
As far as I know the material is 6061 and a casting. They do tell you to let the frame sit for 24 hours after welding before installing the center stand so there must be some air hardening going on. You're right about the modifications, I think that's why my service mgr wants the welding shop to do them although I doubt they have much of a liability policy, so if sued it will probably come back on us.

ibewgypsie
03-30-2005, 11:02 PM
Vibratory stress in the airframes is why the SOviet Helicopters were better than ours in battle conditions. Thiers was steel frames, ours aluminum.

Ours had a better engine, yet more fell out of the sky from airframe failures then thiers.



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David Cofer, Of:
Tunnel Hill, North Georgia