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ibewgypsie
02-01-2005, 11:44 AM
I just glued up a form for a specialty headlight. I was told by my buddy the carpenter to use elmers glue, as good as anything. I laminated exterior 3/4" plywood.

NOW for forming tools? Is a hardwood stick enough or do I need to build a fancy roller stick? I have 22ga mirror polished stainless to stretch over the form.

Release agent? wax on form? Oil on stick? vegetable oil?

David

shawnspeed
02-01-2005, 11:56 AM
David, attempted to spin once , need to invest some time to make proper tools. I bought a Lindsay book on spinning , was well worth the 4.00 . I do belive you will need a polished and hardened spoon to form the stainless along with some good cutting oil. also you may have to have the parts annealed several times to get the desired shape/depth. Stainless work hardens something fierce,when forming. We had some Aircraft header collectors made at a shop I worked at out of spun stainless, 7 annealing cycles to get the parts to final shape ,without cracks.Very expensive. Good luck, Maybe try aluminum first? Shawn

Allan Waterfall
02-01-2005, 12:20 PM
Dave...

Last time I saw anyone spinning metal was at a professional metal spinners.

IIRC...they used a long metal bar with a ball race mounted on the end of it to form the metal,ordinary household bar soap as a lubricant.The end of the forming bar was tucked under the operators armpit for leverage.

The work was held in place with a wooden disc against a running centre,tightened against the metal when it was running true.

I seem to remember they made the actual former out of steel.

Allan



[This message has been edited by Allan Waterfall (edited 02-01-2005).]

Mike Burdick
02-01-2005, 12:54 PM
Maybe this will have some information that will help.

Download this pdf file:

http://prl.stanford.edu/documents/pdf/spinning.pdf

______________________________________

[This message has been edited by Mike Burdick (edited 02-01-2005).]

bikenut
02-01-2005, 02:27 PM
Hey David, good information on the above link. The book from Lindsay's goes into much greater detail, and at less than a six pack, is a pretty good bargain. Check'em out www.lindsaybks.com (http://www.lindsaybks.com) Good people to do business with, and more books on technical stuff than you can shake a stick at.

ibewgypsie
02-01-2005, 05:13 PM
I think what worries me.. is the thought of turning on that 24" cinncinatti lathe, hitting the metal with the tool the part comin spinning out like a hubcap off'n a tire smokin streetrod?

Ever saw one? they will stick into a telephone pole. (We used to street race) Bad on the flagman.

I'll have someone around the first time. The form is glued up, not turned to shape yet but glued. I may bolt it to a backing plate and spindle extension.

David

x39
02-01-2005, 05:52 PM
The Home Shop Machinist had a series on metal spinning a year or two back. Maybe the back issues are still available?

x39
02-01-2005, 05:58 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:
Release agent? wax on form? Oil on stick? vegetable oil?
</font>

Chill out, you're gettin' me excited. The wife has locked herself in the bathroom and the dog is hiding behind the sofa.

DR
02-01-2005, 06:16 PM
Stainless, huh?

Not the stuff most people would want to learn spinning on. It's extremely nasty to spin, to say the least. It'll be a challenge, but from your previous posts it's apparent you like challenges, so go for it.

A roller tool might be best.

Release agent...doubtful you'll get the material to lay over the form tightly, so I wouldn't worry about a release agent.

A word of caution.....be very careful working with stainless. It's dangerous material to spin.

woodspud200
03-31-2005, 09:09 PM
I saw a metal spinning DVD for sale on ebay.
I checked out the website it is a two dvd disc set, explains everything from making your own spinning tools to spinning all kinds of shapes. It might still be on ebay.

the website is

www.metalspinningworkshop.com (http://www.metalspinningworkshop.com)

Orrin
04-01-2005, 09:32 AM
A friend of mine is a hobby metal spinner. He gives this rule of thumb: When spinning soft metals (brass, aluminum, copper, etc.) use a hard tool (polished steel); and, when spinning hard materials use a soft tool (brass).

A professional metal spinner by the name of Paul Wiley wrote a book on the subject. Go to his Web site...

http://www.paulwileyspinning.com/

...and click on "The Art of Metal Spinning"

Paul doesn't recommend spinning stainless steel, even if you are a professional. I've seen it done, but I also have sense enough to listen to someone with 40 years of professional experience.

Paul also has a Yahoo group, The Art of Metal Spinning.

Get a book and listen to a pro.

You can see some pictures of metal spinning at:

http://users.moscow.com/oiseming/lc_ant_p/pic_Spin.htm

It shows the size of the tool and the technique of holding the handle between the upper arm and body.

BTW, glycerin soap works well as a lubricant between the tool and the part being spun.

Regards,

Orrin

dsergison
04-01-2005, 11:47 AM
well since it's a headlight, it would have a hole in the back, right?

if so you can run a bolt or all-thread trough it and into the die as a drawbar rather than just relying on tailstock pressure. then it's captive and cant come out and slice you up.