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Alistair Hosie
09-07-2002, 04:45 PM
I have bought a drill press floor standing made by meddings top quality no problems with its performance however,for some reason Meddings which is a good company here in u k has decided not to fit it with a rack and handle with which to raise and lower it.
Ihave added a wooden table to it and I have a devil of a job raising and lowering it as it is so heavy this is not meant to be humerous I know I have a habit of joking howeverI don't look forward to adjusting it at all as it is really a two man job and I am on my own I was thinking of adding a pulley and weights as a counterbalance to help but don't want to add to the instability at the back making it liable to fall backwards perhaps this would be okay though don't know .
Any ideas out there please help me as I have been very annoyed with this problem since I got it didn't think when I bought it it would be so hard to lift dropping it is a piece of cake but I have to put down whatever I have at hand and try and turn rocking it from side to side till I'm almost there then grab quickly for the locking lever at the back of course my little health problem doesn.t help any suggestions would be most grateful Alistair

John Foster
09-07-2002, 05:18 PM
About the instability. Don't know your set up but, I made an extension to go on the top of my drill press, added a screw and used it as a house jack to help hold up the ceiling where I store a lot of metal. This is now rock solid. With this set up, you could use all the counter weight you want, for the table and not worry about falling over.

SGW
09-07-2002, 05:40 PM
If you can't bolt it to the floor, bolting it to the ceiling does seem like a reasonable option!

Your idea of pulley and counterweight has precedent, I think; I think I've seen pictures of old drill presses with that kind of setup.

Another option might be one (or more) of those gas springs used on vehicle tailgates, if you can find one with enough oomph. I like the counterweight idea for its simplicity though.



[This message has been edited by SGW (edited 09-07-2002).]

Alistair Hosie
09-07-2002, 06:06 PM
never thought of the gas spring at the moment have it on a wheeled trolley so as i can move it but could reposition it if needed gas spring sound like a good idea SGW well thought of Alistair

NAMPeters
09-07-2002, 06:52 PM
I lift the table of my home made 20ton press using a hand winch from a boat trailer. Just a suggestion.

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Neil Peters

George Hodge
09-07-2002, 09:40 PM
I'm using a gas spring to assist raising the head on my Jet 16 Milldrill. It helps greatly! I've seen 'Vise Grip chain pliers'used on the column under the table of a drill press,to keep the table from dropping. I found a engine connecting rod,big end that almost fits the column of my drill press,with a strip of belting,small end holds a table for drills,mic's,etc. Handy to get to and is moveable.

JimWolford
09-07-2002, 11:07 PM
I have a Sears floor model drill press and the table was just too much bother to move so-

I made a clamp and pully for the standard, used a length of sash chain and made a counterweight from a scrap of shafting, 2.75"dia by 21" long.
Now I can move the table with one hand- took about 2 hours to make and two years to get around to doing it.

Jim

Stepside
09-07-2002, 11:24 PM
I use the jack that came with my pick-up truck. A lot of trucks have a nice small jack with a fairly large lifting range. Made a bracket that mounts on the column below the table. works like a dream I can raise the table on a 17" clausing with one hand. Use a scissor jack for the truck because it has a bigger footprint and would have been in the way under the drillpress.

charlie coghill
09-08-2002, 12:00 AM
Alistair: Look at maybe using a jack that is used on the hitch of trailers. Some of then have a angle drive and maybe you could fasten the top of the jack to the taple some way and just crank the elevation up and down.

Just a thought. lots of luck.
Charlie.

docsteve66
09-08-2002, 05:22 PM
This realy works- sounds hokey.

Use a "gas" Spring. Made several, years ago, from a section of pvc schedule 40 pipe. Cap one end, screw a schrader valve in to side of the cap. Use brake shoe rubber cups inside the pipe, either a wood dowell or a telescoping pipe inside (inside pipe capped off where it rests on the cup. Few drops of brake fluid for lubricant on the rubber. Fill with air to desired pressure (this depends on the load- figure the piston area in square inches times the air pressure in PSI. result is what the "spring will lift at maximum extention. Lift increases as the air is compressed. Made some of these years ago, one is still left unused, pressurized for past twenty years and still holding air with no loss so far as I can tell (cant measure with tire guage cause i would lose some air. The piston still moves freely. The spring is held together with some nylon cord, else the piston would make like an arrow.

This adjustable gas spring will put you in the area where you press down to movethe table to position. just be careful that you install it in such a manner that it will "fail safe". Using PVC to hold air in this case should not cause problems becausethere is no traveling shock wave.

Steve

chip's
09-08-2002, 07:16 PM
I really like the gas spring idea. I remember an article somewhere on lifting a drill press table by making a clamp to fit the column above the table with a lifting hook on it to pull the table up. It takes a few times if the table is low to raise it where you need it (lots of clamping and unclamping.)It's not neet or pretty but it would work.
Good luck, Rick.

Thrud
09-08-2002, 08:45 PM
Alistair

If the drill press is unstable you can botl a bracket just under the drill head that extends back to the wall. An extention on this bracket can also be used as a reaction stop for a tapmatic taping unit. You can then attach a cable to the table and winch up with a small hand winch. This would lift several hundred pounds safely so it could be used with work on the table. A gas lift is ok, but if it has a heavy load it goes nowhere. You could make one controlled by shop air - but it needs to be well made to prevent injury from an exploding cylinder.

docsteve66
09-08-2002, 09:20 PM
The "Spring " I spokeof uses just the air in the pipe, I had near zero leakeage. I would be very careful of shop air. Using trapped air, if something breaks the air is gone fast. with shop air the pressure stays and the pipe might explode ratherthan split and leak.

Course I am scared of gases under pressure or even oil from a continous pump. I knew of several cases where aircraft hydraulic fluid got under the skin due to high pressure. the damage cant (or couldnt back then) be repaired. Men lost massive amounts of muscle, skin etc.

And if you lift the table be very sure when it falls that no damage is posible.

Might be nice to know about how many pound we speak of. I am imagining less than 75 pounds.
Steve

Alistair Hosie
09-09-2002, 04:03 PM
Sorry for delay in answering only my phones been out for a few days and Ive had no computer,My son had a little box fitted to his bedroom so that he could get faster access to the net and its been there for six months and we've had the guy out as it seized up leaving me without a phone over the weekend over seven times .

Anyway I like the idea of the scissor jack or gas strut however till I decide I fitted a couple of pulleys to add a weight then halfway through added a large spring which I had lying around seems to help quite a bit as when I push down the spring expands leaving it easier to raise its not perfect but is a halfway help till I get it figured out thanks guys Alistair

Stepside
09-09-2002, 04:15 PM
Alistair

The screw jack is better than the scissor jack, but onlt in size. The benefit of either is they are not going to"leak down" or move at all on their own accord. They also provide a safety device so the table can not drop to the floor when you loosen it to move.
I had to build a "rub rail" on bottom of the table so it would hit the jack as I rotated it about the column.
I have another drill press with the rack elevating system. The one with the jack is much better as the operating system is not back on the column but rather right in front of you.
Pete

Alistair Hosie
09-09-2002, 04:41 PM
Stepside I don't suppose you have an emailable photo do you Alistair

RPM
09-11-2002, 08:42 PM
Dear Alistaire,
I had a similar problem with my 15" Delta Drill Press from mid 60's. Recently I had to do a lot of raising/lowering of the table, and got heartily sick of it. The floor standing Delta is mounted on a heavy 2 1/2" tube, so I machined a three inch OD pulley out of 1" aluminum, machined another piece to fit inside the tube, then mounted the pulley to it with a simple yoke and a half inch bolt as a spindle. I attatched a length of 1/8" aircraft cable to the back of the table with a large U-bolt, ran it over the pulley and attached about sixty pounds, mostly a big 1 1/2" chunk steel with lead sheet wrapped around it. The wire is rated at 1000 pounds plus, and the total weight of the table and weight is about 150 lbs or so. You will probably need help to pull the weight to the right height before you attach the cable to the table, unless you can hold sixty pounds with one hand and fasten a nut and bolt with the other. I had to, but i can't recommend it, unless you really want to get into weight training!The final result was very simple, and you don't see the weight or the pulley since they are inside the tube and belt cover. Delta originally sold this sort of fitting as an after market deal, so the required holes for the cable were already in the casting. Good luck! Richard

RPM
09-11-2002, 08:42 PM
Dear Alistaire,
I had a similar problem with my 15" Delta Drill Press from mid 60's. Recently I had to do a lot of raising/lowering of the table, and got heartily sick of it. The floor standing Delta is mounted on a heavy 2 1/2" tube, so I machined a three inch OD pulley out of 1" aluminum, machined another piece to fit inside the tube, then mounted the pulley to it with a simple yoke and a half inch bolt as a spindle. I attatched a length of 1/8" aircraft cable to the back of the table with a large U-bolt, ran it over the pulley and attached about sixty pounds, mostly a big 1 1/2" chunk steel with lead sheet wrapped around it. The wire is rated at 1000 pounds plus, and the total weight of the table and weight is about 150 lbs or so. You will probably need help to pull the weight to the right height before you attach the cable to the table, unless you can hold sixty pounds with one hand and fasten a nut and bolt with the other. I had to, but i can't recommend it, unless you really want to get into weight training!The final result was very simple, and you don't see the weight or the pulley since they are inside the tube and belt cover. Delta originally sold this sort of fitting as an after market deal, so the required holes for the cable were already in the casting. Good luck! Richard

Alistair Hosie
09-12-2002, 06:22 PM
R P M does the weight pull down on the back of the whole drill press making it unstable don't forget I have this on a wheeled trolley as I want to move it if needed otherwise sounds to be a good idea kindest regards Alistair

Sprocket
09-13-2002, 12:12 AM
The way I read RPM's explanation, it sounds like the weight is inside the post, so it should have no effect on the balance of your machine, except adding weight. Sounds like a tidy solution.

Sprocket
09-13-2002, 12:14 AM
As I understand RPM's post, the weight is inside the column , so should not affect the balance of your machine, only make it heavier. Sounds like a neat solution.

Alistair Hosie
09-13-2002, 06:43 AM
Sprocket as I understand it if you put a length of weighted material inside the post of the drill it would come up quite a height and therefore reduce the dropping height of the table for drilling deep objects although I accept it is otherwise a clever principle or Am I talking nonsense as usual. Strangely enough I have never used the full facility of the large dropping capacity this drill has to offer yetalthough I was talked into buying it by a fellow woodturner friend of mine. I cannot understand what manufacturers were thinking about when they madeor designed these as to how soeone could lift such a weight, with the drill vice to be added to that. Surely in this day and age this would be regarded as a safety issue.Alistair and thanks to all so far as this is a real problem for me

RPM
09-13-2002, 02:50 PM
Alistair,
The group got it right, the weight goes up and down inside the tube, so doesn't affect the balance at all. The original Delta add-on had a pulley at the top, but the cable was attached to a heavy spring that was held in place by a bolt through the tube. I figured the weight was a lot less invasive. I don't know if your DP has a hole in the casting for the cable, but Delta included one in theirs, I guess a 1/2" hole in cast iron wouldn't be too tricky!The pulley centre is such that the cable runs down the centre of the tube, and the other side is directly above the back of the table. Let me know if i can be of any more help.
Richard.

Alistair Hosie
09-13-2002, 07:05 PM
RPM
It sure is a great idea the best I've come across yet. As long as I say it doesn't disturb the ability for the table to be dropped all the way down as I might need to drill a deep hole someday.
Thanks for this tip I think this is the method I will eventually use once my router table is finished (half way through) Alistair

bpsbtoolman
09-15-2002, 09:37 AM
For my Walker Turner floor mounted drill press I attached a bicycle chain to the head and mounted a small sprocket on the table driven by a rod off to the side of the table. Wooks good,but my local junk yard sold me for a couple of bucks the reversable motor powered hospital bed screws. Only a few feet move but cheap and easily attached.
Walt