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View Full Version : Engineer Tape Measyre. Why?



mochinist
06-27-2005, 09:24 PM
We had a vendor in the shop today trying to get me to buy carbide endmills and inserts from them, anyways he was kissing ass real good while he was giving me the sales speech and he gave me a Starret 10' engineers tape measure. It is graduated in 16th's on the top row like normal, but the bottom row is graduated in tenths and hundreds, and not tenths and hundred's like I normally use. One foot is equally divided ten times and then those are divided ten more times.

So now for the dumb question, who uses these? I realize the tape measure say's engineer, but I don't know any engineer's that use this type of measurement. Maybe we learned this in some science class in highschool, but I was to busy chasing tail and don't remember if I did or not.

I included some pics, sorry they are kinda big, but you couldn't see the detail real well when I sized them down.

Click the pics for a bigger picture.

http://x4.putfile.com/6/17720464797-thumb.jpg (http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=6/17720464797.jpg&s=x4)

http://x4.putfile.com/6/17720461831-thumb.jpg (http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=6/17720461831.jpg&s=x4)

http://x4.putfile.com/6/17720453354-thumb.jpg (http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=6/17720453354.jpg&s=x4)

[This message has been edited by mochinist (edited 06-27-2005).]

RobertLC
06-27-2005, 09:31 PM
Graduations of hundredths? On a tape measure? With loose rivets on the end tab of my tape measure, I'm lucky to be within a sixteenth! Hell, if I want that kind of accuracy, I'll use a yardstick. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

garyphansen
06-27-2005, 09:38 PM
I do not no who would us a ten foot tape measure in feet and tenths of feet but land surverying and civil engineering uses feet and tenths of feet. Reading a leveling rod through a transit in feet and tenths of feet is easy but I am not smart enought to read a leveling rod in feet and inches. (Or may be I am smart enought not to try.)
Gary P. Hansen

elbryant
06-27-2005, 10:25 PM
Those are tenths and hundredths of a foot, not tenths and hundredths of an inch. Civil Engineers use them because the calculations are easier than with fractions. Pipe, overflow, gate opening (valves) etc. dimensions are significant in hundredths of a foot.

Of course, metric would be too easy...

Ed

mochinist
06-27-2005, 10:43 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by elbryant:
Those are tenths and hundredths of a foot, not tenths and hundredths of an inch. Civil Engineers use them because the calculations are easier than with fractions. Pipe, overflow, gate opening (valves) etc. dimensions are significant in hundredths of a foot.

Of course, metric would be too easy...

Ed</font>

Yeah that was I kinda thought about metric being easier. I was talking with another guy at work and said it seemed like they were trying to metricise the inch, if that makes any sense. It is a nice tape measure, but I think I will stick with my stanley so I dont make any wrong measurements.

J Tiers
06-27-2005, 11:06 PM
Surveyors use those measurements..... Surveying used to use the traditional measurements like that. They "metricise" the FOOT, if you want to create another word.

You guys "metricise" the inch every day though, so what is the problem?

Besides, Napoleon did not "discover" division by 10, that is much older. He just had to have a different set of measurements...from those in "perfidious Albion".

darryl
06-28-2005, 02:11 AM
I'd like one marked out in tenth's of an inch, with markers for every 50 thou, and fine marks for 25 thou. Forget metric- give me something really oddball. Something that might actually correspond with calipers and machine tool dials.

'loose rivets on the end' I 'fixed' one for my dad once upon a time. When he saw what I'd done he said, "well, that one's wrecked". That's when I learned why those rivets are loose.

[This message has been edited by darryl (edited 06-28-2005).]

tattoomike68
06-28-2005, 02:14 AM
It is just easy to read, here is a level rod pic. it is easy too.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/miketattoo68/rod.jpg

IOWOLF
06-28-2005, 05:47 AM
YEA, the rivets are loose for inside and outside measurments,otherwise you would always be off on one or the other.
Lufkin makes a blue tape that has decimals in places like on the 1/8" I think.

Your Old Dog
06-28-2005, 07:54 AM
I found a 16 foot Lufkin in a hardware store sale bin. It has a window on top for measurig accurately inside of a box. Works just great for furniture work as any error is well within the limits of woods expansion when damp/dry. I went back to buy up some spares but never found another one. It also reads both directions which is somewhat unusual I think.

My dad didn't reem me when I hammerd the loose rivet! He told me why it was there and then said some "rough-in" carpenters thinks it's important! We worked with concrete at the time.