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Tin Falcon
08-16-2005, 09:22 PM
In US Air Force Machinist School they require double eye protection for grinding(Safety glasses and face shield or safty goggles). There have been times when I thought this was over kill. Now I am a little older and hopfully wiser I realy think this is a good idea. I curently work in a steel fabrication shop and my perscription safty glasses have become embedded with steel. Also if any of us have to go for an MRI we will likely need an orbital x-ray as well. A steel chip in the eye could be ripped out of the eye by the magnetic field of the MRI. So I now use a face shield as well as safety glasses while grinding. So stay safe guys.
Jim

Your Old Dog
08-16-2005, 09:46 PM
Tin, this is a subject I know too much about.

I worked at GATX (General American Transportation Corp) making railroad tank cars in Masury Ohio.

I used to go inside the tankers to grind the welds. Preparation consisted of the following,

A bandanna over the nose & mouth.
A large handkerchief tied across the forehead and covering the hair.
A pair of prescription glasses with safety wings
A pair of goggles over those and then a helmut with a full face shield.

I had just crawled into the tank with my big grinder and hadn't ground but a few seconds when I got a piece of something in my eye. All the materials I was using were clean. I spent a few hours in the nurse's office as she worked on me (actually, the nurse's visit was mentioned in another thread http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif )

Suffice it to say, even when being full well aware of the danger and being very careful, it's still possible to get hurt.

[This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 08-16-2005).]

BillH
08-16-2005, 09:52 PM
I have tons of floaters in my eye, little black lines, I wonder...

sandman2234
08-16-2005, 09:52 PM
My wife's career changed due to me not wearing safety glasses. She got hired away from an insurance company, to work for an Opthamologist while I was on a follow up from an emergency room visit.
Blueberry bush I was transplanting took offense at me digging it up and poked me in the eye. I got it back by stripping all of its fruits every year and subjecting it to a hot fire.

Blueberry pie anyone?
David from jax

------------------
Have gun, will travel.

wierdscience
08-16-2005, 10:10 PM
I generally wear safty glasses only,but I also believe in chip guards on machines.Even thou I wear safty glasses I still about once every 5 or 6 years get a chip in an eye.It only stands to reason that with millions of chips and sparks flying around that sooner or later one is going to make it through a nose bridge or side vent.

mochinist
08-16-2005, 10:11 PM
I have had metal in my eye twice, the first time I was wearing just safety glasses. The metal bouced off my check and then bounced off the inside of the safety glasses before attaching to my eye. The second time I was wearing a face shield and safety glasses, not sure how that one got in the eye, but all of sudden I was very uncomfortable. Luckily both times they were able to get the metal out with little damage to my eye's, and as a added bonus the Doctor that took out the metal both times was super hot and she was leaning all over me while removing the metal.

I have also had MRI's and had to have the X ray before hand to make sure metal didn't go shooting thru my body.

J Tiers
08-16-2005, 11:06 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
I have tons of floaters in my eye, little black lines, I wonder...</font>


I bet you are near-sighted, right?

On safety glasses, it sure is hard to remember when you already wear prescription lglasses.... and then its a big adjustment to put on the S-G, too. Stuff isn't where it should be. I tend to lose sight of feet, and have trouble with stairs for a while after new glasses. The S-G are maybe LESS safe then.

Now I know why some folks wear the S-G so much of the time.

BillH
08-17-2005, 12:13 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:

I bet you are near-sighted, right?

On safety glasses, it sure is hard to remember when you already wear prescription lglasses.... and then its a big adjustment to put on the S-G, too. Stuff isn't where it should be. I tend to lose sight of feet, and have trouble with stairs for a while after new glasses. The S-G are maybe LESS safe then.

Now I know why some folks wear the S-G so much of the time. </font>

How did you know? I should go see an eye doctor just to make sure.

spope14
08-17-2005, 08:10 AM
My prescription glasses are safety glasses. safety glasses can come in some rather good looking frames. Nobody knows the difference. My prescrips also come with detachable side shields.

FYI for those who do not know...safety glasses for the machine shop should (and must be for OHSA requirements in an employment environment) of "Z87" quality. As I recall, this quality of lens will stop a 1/2" ball bearing shot at 50 MPH at the lens without the lens shattering. You can tell this quality of glasses by looking at the ear pieces near the front of the glasses, this number will be molded or inscribed there. Prescrips will also have a
mark on each lens, upper outside. WalMat will for example, put WM there, American Optical - AO. The frame will also be marked.

As for off the shelf glasses, a suggestion from one who buys 50 to 100 pair a year. The best type are the wrap type. Snugger fitting to the face. The lenses will fit to th closeness of the face where you should not be able to get a finger between the face and lenses while wearing properly. Any more room and you have room for chips from the below woking areas (such as any machining on lathes, pedestal grinders, hand power tools, wok bench areas).

I have a way I test and demonstrate safety glasss quality to my students. When I buy "bulk" from a company, and am looking at new types, I ask for a sampler pair. I test the frames for easy breakage and lens release on impact - should be hard to do. The test is with a ball peen hammer, and the glasses on an anvil. The next test is the lens itself. Ball peen hammer - ball end - hold h lnses with a vise gip, and beat the heck out of the lens. The lens should not "break off' when subject to impact or once or twice (more than this, they will eventually break off, but if you are subject to more than one or two hits in the eye, something major is up anyway....).

Watch for this "Z87" rating. It is what seperates real safety glasses from cheap immitations, and makes all the difference between safe protection.

Safety glasses with damaged frames should be retired immediately!!!!! They are less than worthless, they are an added risk.

I have three sets of glasses on my trophy case that have saved my eyesight. Thus my ability to spout off on the topic.



[This message has been edited by spope14 (edited 08-17-2005).]

Rustystud
08-17-2005, 09:07 AM
Tin Falcon:

You can't be too careful with your eyes. I tri to wear safety glasses goggles etc. But over the years I have had to have bits of metal removed from my eyes multiple times.`My best advise is to do everything possible to protect your eyes. Second if you get something in your eye go imediately to the optomologist not the optomitrist. Get the foreign matter removed and take the antibiotics as instructed.
You can loose an eye in a matter of hours.
Rustystud

Evan
08-17-2005, 11:20 AM
BillH,

Near sighted people have far more problems with floaters.

madman
08-17-2005, 11:36 AM
If you dont stop it youll go blind. At least thats what Grandma (god rest her sweet soul used to say.

john hobdeclipe
08-17-2005, 09:54 PM
If not for safety glasses I would probably be blind several times over. They've caught everything from carbide shrapnel (when a set of cutters at 6000 rpm hit a hardened steel plate) to grinding sparks to a golf ball sized oak knot that hit dead center in front of my eye.