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decoy91288
10-11-2002, 11:28 AM
Stepside mentioned wearing "those silly glasses" in a comment on safety in another topic.

I am about to get a new glasses prescription and am looking for recommendations for a pair of safety glasses. The over-the-frame cheapos I have been using are hard to see through, scratch way too easily and often have to be removed so I can see what is "really" going on. Not a practice for good eye protection.

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Craig

gvasale
10-11-2002, 02:19 PM
get your prescription made with glass. I always find that even though it has been said that polycarbonate is as clear as glass or something like that I see better (more clearly) with glass lenses than plastic.

SGW
10-11-2002, 02:34 PM
"...often have to be removed so I can see what is "really" going on."

Are you maybe in your late 40s to 50s? :-) Sounds just like me. I solve the "need to remove my glasses so I can see" problem by using a low-power Opti-Visor. I'm not sure what power mine is -- maybe 1 1/2X or so -- but it helps no end.

spope14
10-11-2002, 03:25 PM
My safety glasses are prescription, and bifocal. Z87 approved. Bought via Walmart Optical. Titmus frame, titanium type. Good looking. The numbers are - off the bows - 140-CS97 and on the other bow TNM3-TOR.

Polycarbonate. The best way to clean them is to run under HOT TAP WATER, then clean softly with a cloth - NOT paper towel. If you use a cleaning solution, run under water first - Hot - use solution, run under water, wioe clean with hot water.

The reason for the water first BEFORE ANY wiping is this. Small grinding dust, metal dust. This is inherient in any shop. Wiping first scratches.

chip's
10-11-2002, 08:31 PM
I have plastic too. They scratch, I end up with a new pair about once a year. I still like these better and are not nearly as heavy as glass. I still have to look over the top to see stuff real close up. I really don't want bifocals so I can live with this.
Rick

Al Messer
10-11-2002, 09:06 PM
SGW,

Mine are 1-1/2X and I'd be up the creek without them. I have some regular safety goggles that I use when chips are flying about violently. Can't see out of them worth two cents!!

metal mite
10-11-2002, 09:50 PM
Those glasses aren't so silly when you're sitting in the emergency room with some stranger poking in your eye to remove some piece of cr-p.
Been there, done that, twice.
Don't have any spares (eyes).
Both times rubbed some cast iron grit in with my finger under the glasses.
mite

Oso
10-11-2002, 10:28 PM
The comments on clarity and scratches for plastic vs glass are correct as far as I can see, BUT I still use the plastic (polycarbonate).

The stuff will stop bullets. Under a severe impact the glass shatters. Takes more than regular glass, but still...........

That was enough for me. I'll go with the bulletproof stuff.

BTW, I got a bunch of advice several years ago on another board concerning bifocals in the shop.

I kept it, so if anyone is interested, I could send or post the big pile of stuff.

docsteve66
10-11-2002, 11:17 PM
Just got me a set of "reading glasses". The old one were scratched. I went "first class" UV (although I seldom read out side), scratch proof (another first cause I abuse glasses and no coating will stand what I do to them). I find that its like wearing a filter (camera type). I can see better in drak with out glasess because so much light is blocked. Near as I can tell its like 2 f stops on a camera (used a clear filter to calibrate my eyeballs http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif. No more coatings for me.

Wore glasses after age 45. hated them. felt like living in a barrel. So I got Contacts.

You know contacts won't keep sand out of your eyes? roll under some thing and hit it with a hammer and dirt flies. Before i took to glasses i just squinted and kept going. I wnet back to glasses. love the protection. would wear them even if I did not need them. I guess I am saying we should all wear glasses (plano, if nothing else)

NAMPeters
10-12-2002, 01:13 AM
Safety glasses are fine but when the chips start flying out comes the face shield.

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Neil Peters

Paul Gauthier
10-12-2002, 01:26 AM
My regular glasses are safety lenses, and are trifocals, they make life a lot easier in the shop.

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Paul G.

rmatel
10-12-2002, 10:10 AM
Just picked up a pair of "special" polycarb glasses. Ole Doc was confused when I requested a script for "progressive" lenses in focus from 5 in to 3 ft.
I am 63 yrs old and nearsighted. Had a habit of looking over the top of my glasses to do close work until one day I discovered a blob of solder embedded in a glass lens. Got the progressives in a narrow range so that finding a focus is easier. I can't quite see the clock on the wall across the room but I can still walk around without bumping into things ;-) and they work perfect from machining distances all the way up close so I can "thread needles".

Oso
10-12-2002, 10:27 AM
They told me they "couldn't do that". Can't focus closer than 14". I can focus at 5" with NO glasses, of course.

They also told me they "couldn't" do the lined type with a short to medium focus strip ABOVE the normal area. they tought I was crazy.

Subsequently I have found out that BOTH CAN be done, but have not got new glasses yet.

I got tired of leaning back and tilting head so far when on the ladder trying to see something in an electrical box in the ceiling. Progressives are fine, but the max ends up on the frame line at bottom.

I have a new rule. I won't go to an eye doc who doesn't wear bifocals. The other ones only know what they read in books, and most of it seems to be wrong.

Plus, all they do is repeat, "you just have to adjust to the glasses". Tried that on me when I told them the glasses were not right and the astigmatism axis was wrong.

Well I adjusted just fine, once they finally admitted that they got the axis off by 10 degrees, and fixed it!

capperbar
10-12-2002, 02:41 PM
Ok lets go through what your options are.

Glass..figure the best impact resistance money can buy is equal to 1. Then any plastic "dress thickness" is 4 times more impact resistant and Poly carbonate is ten (10), tougher. So never get in a room with machinery and glass lenses. That includes mowing the lawn. It is just not worth the risk.

You can make "single vision" glasses to be in focus at any distance from your nose to infinity. Though about 8-10 inches is a practical inner limit due to the need to spacing the optical centers on axis for binocular viewing.

Bifocals can be had in many configurations, with a line, without,"progressives". An "add" can be placed above or below the line of site. Lots of aerospace mechanics,electricians and marine engineers need the upper add to work. It is typically the same power as the lower add and same working distance (15-18") The same applies to trifocals.

A very common prescription is a bifocal, lined or unlined, to have the upper part at an intermediate distance and the bottom for near. Mainstay of the computer drivers of the world. The only thing rarely done is to set the upper for near and the bottom for distance. Bet some of the highcrane drivers at the container port use them though.

Usually both eyes are in focus for the same distance in space to preserve biocularity but I have a pair with the right eye closer to sharpen up the front post in high power shooting,also excellent for pistol competitiion for the presbyopes.

You can have a great Doc but they may just not understand your special needs.

If you get a blank stare or a "can't doit", ask around. The lenses are not special just the wllingness to figure out the unusual distances needed. The optical game is like everthing else, not everybody is able/willing to think outside of the box.

Dave Savage, Doctor of Optometry, Seattle

PS A prescrition is a negotiated measurement dependent on your answers/my questions and measuring a living, sqinting,squirming,changing, often vague etc. patient. I figure that a good doc will end up changing about 1-2 % of the RX's for some reason. Frankly sometimes it is just different and who knows why.? And then somebody has to make it exactly right. The error rate in fabricatiing is amazingly low now due to computers. Back to metalworking.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Oso:
They told me they "couldn't do that". Can't focus closer than 14". I can focus at 5" with NO glasses, of course.

They also told me they "couldn't" do the lined type with a short to medium focus strip ABOVE the normal area. they tought I was crazy.

Subsequently I have found out that BOTH CAN be done, but have not got new glasses yet.

I got tired of leaning back and tilting head so far when on the ladder trying to see something in an electrical box in the ceiling. Progressives are fine, but the max ends up on the frame line at bottom.

I have a new rule. I won't go to an eye doc who doesn't wear bifocals. The other ones only know what they read in books, and most of it seems to be wrong.

Plus, all they do is repeat, "you just have to adjust to the glasses". Tried that on me when I told them the glasses were not right and the astigmatism axis was wrong.

Well I adjusted just fine, once they finally admitted that they got the axis off by 10 degrees, and fixed it! </font>



[This message has been edited by capperbar (edited 10-12-2002).]

yf
10-12-2002, 10:44 PM
I only use a polycarbonate full face shield in the shop. On a job I use those goggles that will supposedely fit over glasses.
(I don't wear glasses)
I find that a full face shield doesn't fog up like goggles do and protect against those chips that come in under the edge or through the vents of goggles. (the nerve of them) http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Oso
10-12-2002, 11:34 PM
Hey, it IS metalworking. Aside from a few blind workers, the rest of us want to see, or we won't enjoy our shop work

I must tick these folks off somehow, because first remember, I DON'T NEED glasses to focus close, because I start out very nearsighted.

They could put in flat glass and I would be close to OK for "end-of-nose" work. And I do mean that, at 3 inches from nose, I focus OK without the multifocals.

In fact, I sometimes use just shield glasses (guest safety glasses) for close work.

I think I have another problem, since I still distance and close adapt, just slowwwwwer. So when they go back for the check to see if they hit it OK, the answer is different, and they just give up. They must think I am simply being a pain.

It is after the correction that the trouble starts, since they only think in terms of "adds" for short distances. They always want to START with the correction and work back, not look at other options. And of course I am only the (im)patient, what the h could I possibly know about it more than the "professional".

This when I have had glasses longer than these folks have been alive, understand optics somewhat, etc.

Once had an eye doc (best one I ever went to, retired now) tell me that engineers, preachers and some other group were the toughest to satisfy.
Must be true.

rmatel
10-14-2002, 09:49 AM
Addition to previous post....
When I went to pick up glases I could see the bricks in a building across the parking lot. Complained to Doc. He was "amazed". He retested me and the lenses were replaced with new prescription free of charge. You can get what you want; just be persistant.

crossthreaded
10-14-2002, 09:54 AM
I found out about "cheaters" for welding goggles and helmets in a welding class at the local JC. They clamp in where the filter & plastic impact shield go. They come in even diopter strengths for a Buck or so. I still can't do beads like the instructor; he's an artist. But I see the bead going down really well. I'm 55 and nearsighted as hell.

Mike L
10-14-2002, 02:58 PM
I've worn plastic lenses for many, many years. About 20 years ago I learned how to make them last.

To clean them:
1. Wash your hands. Dirt hands will scratch your lenses.
2. Wash the glasses in warm, soapy water. Be sure and clean the edges of the lenses next to the frame
3. Rinse
4. Dry with a clean cotton cloth
5. Spray a little Pledge furniture wax on the lenses, work it in with your finger and rub it off with a clean, dry cotton cloth.

The Pledge (others may work, I've only used Pledge) will make it harder for foreign material to stick to the lense, and easier to get it off. The cured wax may also be harder than the plastic and prevent some scratches. The wax also fills and hides small scratches in your lenses.

This has worked for me on safety shields, motorcycle face shields, safety glasses and regular plastic glasses.


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Mike L
Amateur machinist, self-taught. I had a poor teacher, but I was a good student.

skykingg
10-14-2002, 03:58 PM
Oso: I got tired of leaning back and tilting head so far when on the ladder trying to see something in an electrical box in the ceiling.

Oso, you can have lenses attached to the top of the primary lenses so you can look into that electrical box. Airline pilots have to be able to see the overhead console so they don't throw the wrong switch. The lenses come in different shapes and sizes and can be like a lens or a prism attached to the corner of the lens. The captains have theirs attached to the right lens and the first officers to their left lens.

Thrud
10-16-2002, 12:20 AM
capperbar, All
Doc, I am glad you pointed out that glass is not really safety glass (many people have been blinded by that presumption). It really irks me that Norm Abrams stands up, points to his stupid glasses and has the nerve to call them "safety glasses".

Wear your poly carbonate lenses BEHIND a lexan full face sheild or use a welding helmet with clear cover windows (if you are really paranoid!). I use my welding helmet when using my Foredom Handpiece free hand. I have had a piece a crap fly into my eye from across a shop and I DO NOT like having my eyeball frozen so the surgeon can dig it out.

So think about how precious your eyes are and stop srewing around with half assed "safety glasses". I have PDR now I cannot afford to take any chances - and neither should any of you. It's not worth it.