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View Full Version : 1st CNC Mill; Light production; recommendations?



Flatline's Up!
08-30-2005, 08:06 PM
New to machining in general and interested in gettting my first CNC Mill. I want to do some light production work of paintball gun parts. 90% aluminum, 10% steel usage. Most all parts are less than 12x5x2" .
My shop is small as well. Lower cost is a factor.

New vs Used?
Any good BASIC CNC threads/forums/websites to help me get up to speed?
Brands? Manx, Sherline, Taig, Retrofit a larger import?

any suggestions would be appreciated...
Thanks,
Britt (FL^!)

John Stevenson
08-30-2005, 08:15 PM
You might have to hurry but this is nearly a turnkey operation.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7540244496

John S.

IOWOLF
08-30-2005, 08:52 PM
For your application get a Haas VMC.

IMHO

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The tame Wolf !

mochinist
08-30-2005, 09:03 PM
What do you want to spend?

How much more than that could you spend?

What kind of part's will they be, if it is fairly simple you can writet the programs out by hand, if they are more complex, you will also want a cad/cam package. For a lowend cad/cam you could spend less than a $1000 and get something like Bobcad(crappy program in my opinion but it is cheap), I believe Ibew uses something called Mach3 that was farily cheap, I have never used it though so couldn't tell you if it was worth a squat, for $1000 and quite a bit more there is a number of cad/cam programs to break the bank with.

Forums cnc related
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=forum;f=13
http://www.cadcamforum.net/board/viewforum.php?f=1
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.machines.cnc
http://www.mmsonline.com/dp/forums/forum_display.cfm?f_id=93&pub=MMS



[This message has been edited by mochinist (edited 08-30-2005).]

Davis In SC
08-30-2005, 10:49 PM
Hurco... Great machines, easy to program...

Rich Carlstedt
08-30-2005, 11:56 PM
Hurco
Easiest CNC to program
No G code
American machine

rsr911
08-31-2005, 12:04 AM
I'm happy with my bridgeport Boss 5 the way it is, but I'm upgrading to full PC control. It's a big mill but does small work just fine. IBEW has a similar mill already upgraded. The nice thing about these is the are heavy enough to make small work a walk in the park. I cut circle blanks out of 1/4" steel at 80 IPM , 0.040" DOC and 1600 rpm.

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-Christian D. Sokolowski

hammerhead74000
08-31-2005, 12:59 AM
The Mach products are control programs, not CAM systems - although they do have some "Wizard" functionality, and can bring in a DXF file.

I am currently helping a guy build a conversion for his Grizzly mill, in this thread:

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=13;t=001735

However, what's best for you depends on what your budget is, how much time you can spend setting a machine up, your target production rates, and what your skills are (are you comfortable putting together your own PC from parts, can you do basic soldering, basic wiring, etc - given what you're asking for, I will assume that you can do basic machine-shop type stuff to assemble the mechanical aspects of it, should you decide to go the conversion route).

psomero
08-31-2005, 01:44 AM
get a tree mill. there's an essentially brand new, unused one sitting in the storage room at work and my boss wants $15k for it. damn, i sure wish i had $15k...

Flatline's Up!
08-31-2005, 11:18 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hammerhead74000:
The Mach products are control programs, not CAM systems - although they do have some "Wizard" functionality, and can bring in a DXF file.

I am currently helping a guy build a conversion for his Grizzly mill, in this thread:

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=13;t=001735

However, what's best for you depends on what your budget is, how much time you can spend setting a machine up, your target production rates, and what your skills are (are you comfortable putting together your own PC from parts, can you do basic soldering, basic wiring, etc - given what you're asking for, I will assume that you can do basic machine-shop type stuff to assemble the mechanical aspects of it, should you decide to go the conversion route).</font>


I followed that thread very closely and you have just about talked me into doing the uprade on my mill... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

This may very well be the way I go. I really appreciate your posts in the linked thread.

Wirecutter
08-31-2005, 12:49 PM
Hammerhead -
Thanks for the link post - great info, and good on you for all the help you're giving rsilvers. Great stuff there. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif