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J Tiers
12-02-2004, 11:48 PM
First, these pics are of the old carriage, a model 200 "type A" (my term) short carriage. I subsequently changed over to a "type B" carriage which is 10" long instead of 9 1/4" like the "type A".

When I did the mod to the new one, I moved the gits oilers to the tailstock side. The "type B" has longer wings on that side than the "type A". The oiling doesn't work quite as well, since it is harder to get it to the headstock side when near the headstock. It is still decent, and the oilers are more protected from the workpiece.

General view of top. Note oilers on headstock side wings.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/Carglub2.jpg

General view of bottom. You can see the oil hole and the copper tube about 1/3 up from bottom. Also note the "ramps" scraped in on the flat-way side at each end of the central relief area.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub1.jpg

Cloe-up of the V-way oil hole. YES, I did do this better on the next one, with oil spreaders scraped into the sides. But this worked quite well, despite looking like ^&$%.
And, yes, the P.O. had allowed something to get under and bung up the v-way. I don't know what the red stuff is, this carriage has been in storage for a while.
I should mention that the crummy appearance is from stupidly trying to use a drill bit to make an enlarged area as a spreader. Next one I simply scraped, turned out as clean as the "ramps"
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub3.jpg

View of the rear flat way oiler. The tube is because it has to drop the oil a ways over from the best place to drill the hole. Just behind the tube is a "ramp" scraped on the edge to help the oil under the edge. Same at other side (near side, just out of photo towards you). Tube is pressed into a proper-sized hole drilled for that purpose up from bottom. I tapped it in with a small hammer, accounting for the scruffy edges on the end.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub4.jpg

Close up of oiler.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub5.jpg

The oiler holes were drilled with a small oil passage, around 0.078 inch (2mm) and then counterbored to fit the 3/16 press-in oiler.

I did not use the ball-type oilers, because I think they can let in crud too easily. These have good covers, and the oiler can have a "filter" put in. Swarf does not collect in places where it will inevitably be forced in with the oil, as the ball types are prone to allow.

A piece of pulled-apart felt in the oiler cup keeps swarf out of the oiler. A slight bend in the flip-cap will prevent an air-lock that allows oil to pump back, or fail to go down.

I had cleaned the carriage before and after the work. But, for some time after, I continued to get dirty oil out. Now, the oil from under the carriage is always clean. I feel that I have eliminated quite a bit of abrasive gunk this way, and the carriage tends to glide nicely.

A view of the new carriage showing lube points on tailstock side of "type B" carriage.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub6.jpg




[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 12-05-2004).]

Rick Hand
12-03-2004, 05:43 AM
Nice J. Thanks for posting the pics! Looks like a very worthwhile mod. It has always bothered me to put oil directly on the ways and let it drag anything and everything under.
Rick

Buckshot
12-05-2004, 05:13 AM
.........J Tiers, thanks for posting the photo's along with the explaination. I plan on pulling the apron off my 11" Logan as soon as I can collect a few unassigned "Rountuits" and will definately include this modification. I also need to seal the apron as the oil I put in keeps oozing out. I had figured to put in ball oilers, but your reason for not doing so makes good sense to me.

Best,
Rick

Slywuf
09-01-2005, 10:01 AM
I'm trying to find where I can buy several of those Gits flip top oilers. I need the 7/16 press in size. Can you tell me where I might find them? Thanks


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:
First, these pics are of the old carriage, a model 200 "type A" (my term) short carriage. I subsequently changed over to a "type B" carriage which is 10" long instead of 9 1/4" like the "type A".

When I did the mod to the new one, I moved the gits oilers to the tailstock side. The "type B" has longer wings on that side than the "type A". The oiling doesn't work quite as well, since it is harder to get it to the headstock side when near the headstock. It is still decent, and the oilers are more protected from the workpiece.

General view of top. Note oilers on headstock side wings.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/Carglub2.jpg

General view of bottom. You can see the oil hole and the copper tube about 1/3 up from bottom. Also note the "ramps" scraped in on the flat-way side at each end of the central relief area.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub1.jpg

Cloe-up of the V-way oil hole. YES, I did do this better on the next one, with oil spreaders scraped into the sides. But this worked quite well, despite looking like ^&$%.
And, yes, the P.O. had allowed something to get under and bung up the v-way. I don't know what the red stuff is, this carriage has been in storage for a while.
I should mention that the crummy appearance is from stupidly trying to use a drill bit to make an enlarged area as a spreader. Next one I simply scraped, turned out as clean as the "ramps"
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub3.jpg

View of the rear flat way oiler. The tube is because it has to drop the oil a ways over from the best place to drill the hole. Just behind the tube is a "ramp" scraped on the edge to help the oil under the edge. Same at other side (near side, just out of photo towards you). Tube is pressed into a proper-sized hole drilled for that purpose up from bottom. I tapped it in with a small hammer, accounting for the scruffy edges on the end.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub4.jpg

Close up of oiler.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub5.jpg

The oiler holes were drilled with a small oil passage, around 0.078 inch (2mm) and then counterbored to fit the 3/16 press-in oiler.

I did not use the ball-type oilers, because I think they can let in crud too easily. These have good covers, and the oiler can have a "filter" put in. Swarf does not collect in places where it will inevitably be forced in with the oil, as the ball types are prone to allow.

A piece of pulled-apart felt in the oiler cup keeps swarf out of the oiler. A slight bend in the flip-cap will prevent an air-lock that allows oil to pump back, or fail to go down.

I had cleaned the carriage before and after the work. But, for some time after, I continued to get dirty oil out. Now, the oil from under the carriage is always clean. I feel that I have eliminated quite a bit of abrasive gunk this way, and the carriage tends to glide nicely.

A view of the new carriage showing lube points on tailstock side of "type B" carriage.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub6.jpg


[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 12-05-2004).]</font>

ERBenoit
09-01-2005, 11:41 AM
Slywuf,

Oil hole covers are availiable from McMaster-Carr and MSC. You might also find them from local bearing or power transmission suppliers.

http://www.mcmaster.com/
http://www1.mscdirect.com/

egpace
09-01-2005, 12:31 PM
You can also get them right from the source...

http://www.gitsmfg.com/gravity-feed-oil-cups-Style-D.asp