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Rustybolt
08-31-2005, 07:54 AM
anisotropy-gr a turning. the refractivity of an object.unequal measurement consisting of asymetric parts.

The short version from the OED


Damn you Forrest.


I got yer 'compendium' right here.

Forrest Addy
08-31-2005, 10:17 AM
Anisotropy? D'ya get that from sausage pizza? Oh and compendium is what they pur in sherpening stones. "Illigitumus non Conpendium." did I get the quote right?

[This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 08-31-2005).]

Wirecutter
08-31-2005, 11:37 AM
I thought anisotropy was a phenomenon related to craniorectosis.

Pat Miles
08-31-2005, 11:56 PM
Can you take pennicillin for that?

egpace
09-01-2005, 12:12 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Forrest Addy:
Anisotropy? D'ya get that from sausage pizza? Oh and compendium is what they pur in sherpening stones. "Illigitumus non Conpendium." did I get the quote right?

[This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 08-31-2005).]</font>

"sherpening stones" I'm Sure you must mean "Illegitimi Non Carborundum." http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

[This message has been edited by egpace (edited 09-01-2005).]

Evan
09-01-2005, 12:15 AM
No, Forrest meant compendium.

Evan
09-01-2005, 12:17 AM
Anisotropy: Microscopic anisotropy relates to the variation of a property measured perpendicular to the bedding from that measured parallel to the bedding because plate-like mineral grains and interstices tend to orient themselves parallel to the bedding. Macroscopic anisotropy relates to the variation resulting from thin beds and fracture planes whose properties differ appreciably from those of the remaining volume over which a measurement is made.


(It's a grinding wheel thing)

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 09-01-2005).]

Forrest Addy
09-01-2005, 12:27 AM
How about this? Anistropy is what makes wooden musical instruments sound so sweet.

egpace
09-01-2005, 12:28 AM
Evan,
Notice the wink...

Illegitimi Non Carborundum...

"Don't let the bastards wear you down"

Ed

PS Spent a year making tools to grind precision optics.

Mike P
09-01-2005, 11:38 AM
Anisotropy is a variation in mechanical properties in each direction (x,y & z).

Metals are generally isotropic (equal properties in all directions).

Wood and composites are anisotropic. They exhibit different properties parallel and perpendicular to the grain (or to the fibers).

Mike P

Evan
09-01-2005, 12:18 PM
"Metals are generally isotropic (equal properties in all directions)."

Not so. Various processes cause metal to have anisotropic properties. This especially applies to certain cold working techniques. For instance, cold rolled and stretcher leveled aircraft aluminum sheet has a distinct grain structure that is aligned with the long dimension of the sheet. In the high strength alloys such as 2024 and especially the 7000 series it makes a big difference to operations such a brake forming. This must be taken into account when calculating bend radii.

Carl
09-01-2005, 12:45 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">I thought anisotropy was a phenomenon related to craniorectosis.</font>


http://personal.ecu.edu/wuenschk/jpg/HeadUpAss.jpg

Wirecutter
09-01-2005, 12:48 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Mike P:
Anisotropy is a variation in mechanical properties in each direction (x,y & z).

Metals are generally isotropic (equal properties in all directions).

Wood and composites are anisotropic. They exhibit different properties parallel and perpendicular to the grain (or to the fibers).

Mike P</font>


Regardless of what materials have which properties, that's the best and clearest explaination of what anisotropy really is. Sorry Evan - sometimes the dictionary just makes thing worse... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

And yes, the previous post best describes craniorectosis.


[This message has been edited by Wirecutter (edited 09-01-2005).]

ibewgypsie
09-01-2005, 01:37 PM
Turbidity: the effect of cloudiness in a fluid or gas..

I have calibrated turbidity meters.

Evan
09-01-2005, 01:48 PM
Turgidity:

Rustybolt
09-01-2005, 02:29 PM
Stupidity?

Wirecutter
09-01-2005, 03:16 PM
Dowhopshoodipity?

Carl
09-01-2005, 03:21 PM
Evan
Member posted 09-01-2005 01:48 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Turgidity:


Decorum prevents posting an illustration of that one.

Evan
09-01-2005, 04:13 PM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/turg.jpg

tonydacrow
09-01-2005, 04:41 PM
You guys are a little too deep for me. Well..., something's a little too deep around here! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

sauer38h
09-01-2005, 07:36 PM
"Anisotropy" per se is not specific to materials. It's a much more general concept than that. It can be used to describe, say, radiation flux, or some mathematical distributions. General physical laws can often be said to be isotropic or anisotropic.

Uh, what was the question?

Flatline's Up!
09-01-2005, 08:15 PM
' &lt;now that's an apostrophe!