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View Full Version : Chip pan - Stainless or Aluminum



Kdahm
08-15-2005, 05:38 PM
Getting ready to make a chip pan for under my lathe.

What materials are recommended/used

Aluminum (Aluminium across the pond)- Cheaper, easier to bend, but wears more easily. 16 gauge.

Stainless - more expensive, harder to form, much more durable. 20 gauge.

Thanks
Karl

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At a certain point in the course of any project, it comes time to shoot the engineers and build the damn thing.

wierdscience
08-15-2005, 06:03 PM
What's wrong with 16ga carbon steel?

I would go with the aluminum if your stuck with an either or situation.The thicker ga. should make it stiffer.

Forrest Addy
08-15-2005, 06:09 PM
Stainless if you have to carbon steel works great.

You do not want aluminum. It's soft and the chips are hard to move and sweep from it.

Dave Burnett
08-15-2005, 06:58 PM
I agree with Forrest, spend the money and get the stainless. The clean up is a lot easier as the chips will not mar the surface like they would with Aluminum.

GNO
08-15-2005, 07:12 PM
how about an old shallow baking pan? allready made & works great!

ricksplace
08-16-2005, 10:27 AM
Baking Pan is what I use. Cheap and ready made. Beware of SWMBO.

John Stevenson
08-16-2005, 10:42 AM
Can you get 14 foot baking pans ?

Evan
08-16-2005, 11:17 AM
No, but you can get a 5 pack of disposable aluminum 20" roaster pans for a few dollars.

Kdahm
08-16-2005, 11:49 AM
Thanks for the replies so far.

The pan I need will be 24"x60". I already have a carbon steel pan, but didn't want to use it. I'd have to paint it (more scratches, appearance), clean and oil it (dust collector), or galvanize it (why bother).

I was going to use stainless for appearance, but someone this weekend suggested aluminum and I wanted to double check here.

Karl

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At a certain point in the course of any project, it comes time to shoot the engineers and build the damn thing.

ibewgypsie
08-16-2005, 12:01 PM
Rust? your lathe don't leak oil like mine does?

Gee, everything around my lathe is oiled well. The mill setup front to front with the lathe even gets oiled. But, I can run both at once.

I'd stay with something that works.. heavy enough to load up with at least 5gallons of chips. I got two 5 gallon buckets under mine right now that need to go somewhere.. I been putting them in a hole next to the privacy fence.

David

J Tiers
08-16-2005, 12:02 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Kdahm:
I'd have to paint it (more scratches, appearance), clean and oil it (dust collector), or galvanize it (why bother).
</font>

Hmmmm.... Mine oils itself..... no problem. And as for dust, its full of chips anyhow, so...........?

Don't let the "really clean shop trap" get you... it's a lot of work, and you'll make the rest of us look bad http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 08-16-2005).]

Rusty Wrench
09-08-2005, 03:55 PM
Greetings from Toano, Va
I use an 18x30 flat oil drip pan from NAPA under my Taig hybred lathe. It works well and was about 5 bucks. Made a plexiglas back shield with a magnetic base to keep swarf off the wall. Note: The hybred lathe is a regular Taig mounted on 50mmx100mm 80/20 extruded aluminum.

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Russ Hobgood

Pete Burne
09-08-2005, 04:52 PM
My 12 x 5 Hendey has an impressive cast iron chip tray (oil tray on a cone head) but is awkward to clean out.

I use a baking pan stradling the chip tray that is super easy to remove and dump.

Pete

Lee Paul
09-08-2005, 07:08 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by John Stevenson:
Can you get 14 foot baking pans ?</font>

Sure.........just take 7 or 8 two footers, snip off the ends and weld them together.

You "can" weld........right John??? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

Al Messer
09-08-2005, 07:37 PM
Karl, the Carbon Steel chip pan under my 1943 Logan lathe is still holding up well---no rust spots, maybe a few dis-colored sports, but, heck, I don't worry about its cosmetic appearance, just does it catch chips and cutting oil, which it does very well.

freddycougar
09-08-2005, 10:41 PM
go with the stainless....looks GREAT
freddy

bikenut
09-09-2005, 01:16 AM
Something else to think about - if you are using a coolant, not all are compatible with aluminum and can have a chemical reaction.

Swarf&Sparks
09-09-2005, 10:35 AM
Is this a windup?
corrosion resistance etc.
Do you have a stainless steel lathe?

lynnl
09-09-2005, 11:59 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Lee Paul:
Sure.........just take 7 or 8 two footers, snip off the ends and weld them together.

You "can" weld........right John??? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif</font>

Simpler still, just order a 14 ft cake from the bakery, and tell 'em you need the pan to carry it home in.

rsr911
09-10-2005, 03:41 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by gene wiedenroth:
how about an old shallow baking pan? allready made & works great!</font>


I use a commercial bakers sheet pan, they come in aluminum or fiberglass, the one I have is fiberglass and works really nice.


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-Christian D. Sokolowski