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Doc Nickel
08-18-2001, 12:29 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
We could tuck Texas over in a corner of British Columbia and forget where we put it.</font>

-Well, we could saw Alaska in half and make Texas the third largest state. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Doc.

BobWarfield
02-27-2006, 04:02 PM
I am working on a smoker project:

http://www.thewarfields.com/img/Cooking/TexasSmoker.JPG

My question is how to go about bending the curves around the edges of the state in 1/4" steel plate? The plate will be about 2 feet wide.

Is this something that can be done with a hydraulic press? Is there some other suggestion?

The best suggestion I have gotten so far is to go find a shop in the area with plate rolling machines of sufficient capacity. I'd rather do it myself if someone has a good suggestion for how.

Best,

BW

[This message has been edited by BobWarfield (edited 02-27-2006).]

tonydacrow
02-27-2006, 04:06 PM
I'd just use my teeth.

But; if your dentist would disaprove I think the idea of a hydrolic press is good. However, I think you'd have to go for at least a 50 ton model...

Tinkerer
02-27-2006, 04:14 PM
Well you could cut your profiles brace them.. then weld heat and beat.... weld heat and beat. Or make your smoker and face with the TX State profile and box with lighter gauge materials.

Doozer
02-27-2006, 04:23 PM
Neat! It looks like an Iron Worker.
--Doozer

mklotz
02-27-2006, 04:36 PM
Move to Wyoming.

Carl
02-27-2006, 05:21 PM
Once you have the profile of the front and rear plates done, spot weld the side plate in question onto the front and rear plates at the point on the front plate and the point on the rear plate where the curve begins. Then heat, bend, and spot weld every inch or so until you have what you need. Then go back and weld it all solid. Either that, or move to Rhode Island. http://www.ugly-smilies.de/data/ugly_rock.gif

Evan
02-27-2006, 05:38 PM
At least it isn't Alaska...

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/alaska.gif

BobWarfield
02-27-2006, 05:48 PM
If I lived in any of those other states you recommend, it would still have to be a Texas smoker. Note that I do live in California, which is calculated to be the place that will probably be the most annoyed with the whole idea of a Texas-shaped smoker--Suits me fine! LOL

Incidentally, I think I want to build the curved sides first and get them approximately right. I've got a plasma cutter that will make short work of cutting the Texas shapes. It'll be easier to get the curved plates about right and cut the front and rear to fit those than the other way around.

So a 50 ton hydraulic press, eh? Hmmmm....

I'll wait for the hydraulic press people to weigh in on this if you'll 'scuse the pun.

Best,

BW

Carl
02-27-2006, 06:15 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Note that I do live in California, which is calculated to be the place that will probably be the most annoyed with the whole idea of a Texas-shaped smoker--Suits me fine! LOL</font>

...Kalifornicateia?...you will probably receive a visit from your friendly local SWAT TEAM at your first barbecuing event of the season http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v35/lathefan/d8e25869.gif http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v35/lathefan/04d44f23.gif

[This message has been edited by Carl (edited 02-27-2006).]

Ries
02-27-2006, 06:18 PM
Actually you need a hydraulic press BRAKE- not just a press.
And yes, I would figure on 50 tons or so.
A press just has one cylinder moving up and down- to make it a brake, you need to build a top die holder that is the full width, and then make it so it doesnt swivel on the cylinder.
Do-able, but a pretty big construction project on its own- probably more of a project than building the smoker.

I would do it the other way- cut the flat parts first, trace the profile on a piece of 1/2" plywood, cut it out with a jig saw- then go to a shop that has both a big power roll, and a press brake, and have them form the 1/4" plate to fit your templates.

A power roll to roll 1/4" plate, 4 feet wide, runs about 10 grand.
A press brake that will do 4 feet of 1/4" is at least that much- more like 25 grand for the new ones with cnc back gages and hydraulics.
So a shop that is all set up with 30 grand or so of equipment can whip these out in an hour or two- around here shop rate for a shop like that is 75 bucks an hour- quite a bargain if you ask me.

George Hodge
02-27-2006, 06:49 PM
If you have access to oxy-acetylene,or a plasma torch,you can make a series of cuts across the point where you want the bend,like this-----------,leaving just a small amount of metalto heat to make the bend.Then use a welder to weld the ---- spaces . It works,if you don't have the press to do it,just takes more time and fuel.

HWooldridge
02-27-2006, 07:29 PM
Torch and a rosebud accompanied by gentle persuasion from a GM tool (sledge hammer).

Your Old Dog
02-27-2006, 07:31 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by George Hodge:
If you have access to oxy-acetylene,or a plasma torch,you can make a series of cuts across the point where you want the bend,like this-----------,leaving just a small amount of metalto heat to make the bend.Then use a welder to weld the ---- spaces . It works,if you don't have the press to do it,just takes more time and fuel.</font>


Very clever idea! I would never have come up with that. Now lets see if I can cough it up in the future when needed !!

Dawai
02-27-2006, 07:32 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/sscn1387.jpg

Dis is 1/2 plate and 50 tons of press that scares the georgia bejesus outa me.

I suggest a pattern shop with a flame cutter or water jet and then welding all the pieces together.

mochinist
02-27-2006, 08:06 PM
God bless Texas
http://www.racetrackcamping.com/images/Texas_Bikini_Team.jpg

Dawai
02-27-2006, 09:11 PM
Them texas girls sure are skinny. A 300lb Georgia man would hurt them. Ahh'll keep my Michigan gal thank ya..

I loved them dancers, hard as a rock, loved the girls in Martial arts, they always when they'd mess up in class and knock the devil outa you, you'd always wonder if it was the cheapass restruant you took them too..

I know one local couple, when they argue, they have to buy new furniture. Most them girls like them in that thar pictur make ya pay just to be seen with them. Treat em like they treat others and they don't know how to act.

barts
02-27-2006, 11:19 PM
When I got to the end of this thread, I thought someone
wanted a steel bikini for these gals; I'd go looking for a gal
that needed less curvature in her clothing.... even if bending it
would be hard, fitting it would be fun... I did that one day years ago at a Ren Faire... spent the day fitting hammered metal cups on young women. Lots of interesting piercings, there were... There'd be a lot more interest in metal working if that sort of job was more common...

Anyway... you could use various widths of steel bar to plate
the curved parts of the smoker; ther ewould be more welding, though.

- Bart

Dawai
02-28-2006, 12:36 AM
Barts:

That is precision machining. I remember once making my Live-in a gstring from a scrap off a old leather glove, hand stitched it.

Next thing you knew all the girls were laying on my bed while I cut a paper pattern to cover the Hooch. I gave away the first four or five, then got a bill each after that.

After a project like that, keeping your head cool, nothing will distract me when I have my sights set on my goal.

Then, lemme tell you about tattooing them pretty fingernails.. yeah, got $75 a finger.. and it growes off.. you have to redo it in about eight months.. I always wanted to jerk a fingernail off and tattoo underneath it, kinda like a picture frame, forever.. not got the balls Here, the top of the right foot was enough. The times I have lost a fingernail, nope ain't nobody touching that thing with a needle. Boring a hole in it with a drill bit or hot needle was enough to make me cry like a lil girl. I got a circuit board drill I carry in my wallet, right next to the scapel blade.. Last time, I dropped one of them plywood reels of cable on it. Edge just hit the big toe. YEP, fitters and welders were laughin till I pulled my boot off and drilled for blood. (broke that damn toe 300 miles from home)

Yeah, I think I could cut out a custom grill like that and weld it up. NOW, the way my grill works? I got a smoker, a box down low I burn sticks and wet hickory in. I like oak too. You burn them sticks in the one box, the smoke flows up and across the meat then out the grill. It gets so hot, really too hot, I needed a dual stack with one release and one smoker-to grill valve. AND cheap? I am cheap don't cha know.. I cook with about five minutes of machete work instead of $5 of charcoal. AND the meat tastes so much better smoky. It's ugly, a rusty waterheater, cut into a 90 with the firebox on one end. Next one? it'll have the firebox in the middle/behind and two stacks. I keep my eyes open for the next hot water heater on the curb. I don't need a fancy state-ment of a ego mania grill.

My buddy doc, he has one that looks like a steam engine.. pretty but cooks like crap.. Each time he invites us to a cookout, he passes out and we do the cooking. (300lb mass=mass asorbtion of alcohol) It takes twenty pounds of charcoal to make that thing cook.

BobWarfield
02-28-2006, 09:25 AM
Well ya had to go bring psychology into it didn't ya? First its sex then its ego. Man that Freud guy would be having a ball with this one.

My perspective is that its outstanding karma (yup, been in California too long) that meat cookin' physics work so well in the shape of the Great State of Texas. This smoker works really well--I've tasted the goods out of my brother's original model I've pictured. He got it from a restaurant that was doing a great business outside Grapevine. They upgraded to a much bigger machine (sadly, no longer looks like Texas). It does not burn much wood (charcoal? that's for webers!). Start it off with 2 logs and add one more about every 4 hours. Mesquite, pecan, whatever you like.

Here is the secret ingredient to making it work:

http://www.thewarfields.com/img/Toys/MachineTools/Smoker/TejasGhost.jpg

Gotta have that baffle right there. Makes the smoke path nice and long. Draft is from bottom, around the baffle, and up through the adjustable stacks at top. The 1/4" plate gives it plenty of thermal mass so it keeps the temps real steady.

Best,

BW

kap pullen
02-28-2006, 09:39 AM
An alternate to the flame cut idea is band saw cuts from alternating sides leaving about 2". Then heat and bend, and run a bead back in the saw cuts.

Tom Terning did this on the front axle mount of my half scale traction engine boiler.

He forgot to reweld the thing so that is how I know.

Kap

PBMW
02-28-2006, 09:53 AM
Why would you want to make it out of 1/4 steel???
half that would be sufficient
Jim

tonydacrow
02-28-2006, 11:42 AM
Come on, PBMW:

Everything is bigger in Texas!

Dawai
02-28-2006, 12:50 PM
Tony:

I worked with a texan who bragged so much, He annoyed everyone with his statements and claims.

Is that deer a baby? we got big ones in texas. (friend killed a large 12 pointer)

Gee, you can drive across this state in 30 minutes..

WE got that electrician a plane ticket home for his birthday. Even the plant people pitched in. He didn't go back to Texas thou, just quit and took the money.

If it was SOOOOO good I asked him, why are you here making OUR money?

torker
02-28-2006, 01:22 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by George Hodge:
If you have access to oxy-acetylene,or a plasma torch,you can make a series of cuts across the point where you want the bend,like this-----------,leaving just a small amount of metalto heat to make the bend.Then use a welder to weld the ---- spaces . It works,if you don't have the press to do it,just takes more time and fuel.</font>

We do lots of that in the fabricating business. We call it field bending because you can bend almost anything anywhere like that.
If I was asked to build that I'd figure the radius needed then cut the 2 ft long sections out of the proper wall thickness pipe.
At the scrap yard there are enough different sizes that one would be darn sure close enough for that.
Russ

Your Old Dog
02-28-2006, 04:53 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BobWarfield:
The 1/4" plate gives it plenty of thermal mass so it keeps the temps real steady. BW</font>

I wondered why you were being so damned hard on yourself with the 1/4" stuff! I have big smoker too but it's 10 gauge and I thoght it was a load to get up in the loft in the fall !! (you won't be doing much smoking during the Buffalo Winters !!)

Evan
02-28-2006, 05:21 PM
We could tuck Texas over in a corner of British Columbia and forget where we put it.

BobWarfield
02-28-2006, 05:31 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by David E Cofer:
Tony:

I worked with a texan who bragged so much, He annoyed everyone with his statements and claims.

</font>

Texas has no monopoly on that behavior. It appears to me you could have that complaint about half the posts on this board without even knowing what state they were from.

The 1/4", incidentally, is very common for large capacity commercial smokers for exactly the reason I mentioned together with the issue of durability. Some even build from 1/2", especially around the firebox.

Thermal stability is a big issue in terms of how much you have to monitor the smoker, how easy it is to control for different purposes, and generally how well it will work.

You can find out more about smokers on this page if you're interested:

http://www.thewarfields.com/SmokerResources.htm

But hey, don't take my word for it, I'm just another damned Texan!

I'm most likely to take the path of finding a shop to do the plate rolling. I may experiment with cutting the slots, bending, and fill welding them as I go on some scrap depending on whether I get some time. Too many projects!

Best,

BW

Rustybolt
02-28-2006, 07:57 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
We could tuck Texas over in a corner of British Columbia and forget where we put it.</font>


Hell. There's parts of Canada, that Canada doesn't know what's there. Walk off into the muskeg far enough and all the bears are white.

tonydacrow
03-02-2006, 02:15 PM
The other reason to use 1/4 plate is you can use it as a gun safe when you're not smokin'... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

BobWarfield
03-02-2006, 06:44 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
We could tuck Texas over in a corner of British Columbia and forget where we put it.</font>

Wow! Must not be much in BC 'cause Texas has almost 75% of the area of it.

OTOH, Canadians are very nice people. My best friend at work is Canadian. Best darn guy, 'cept when he gets talking to much about curling of course.

LOL

BW