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maddmaxx65301
10-17-2005, 06:50 PM
How can I keep my tools from rusting in my tool box when I cant control the environment. I.E. Humidity

J Harp
10-17-2005, 07:13 PM
I have heard that camphor will work, an old fellow once told me he kept a urinal cake in his toolbox, said it gave off camphor fumes and prevented rust. I havn't tried it myself.



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Jim

JS
10-17-2005, 07:50 PM
I read somewhere that mothballs prevent rust. I believe it was in an old issue of the homeshop machinist.

IOWOLF
10-17-2005, 08:08 PM
BUT, don't the mothes protest?

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The tame Wolf !

Your Old Dog
10-17-2005, 08:19 PM
Don't open them in a warm environment when they are cold. Plays hell with our cameras at work.

I had trouble in the Spring with warm moist Southern air when the barn was still frozen. The barn was really drafty at that time and every bit of cast iron I own rusted almost overnight. My mill hadn't even been plugged in as it was still new and it was all rusted up.

Neither WD-40 nor silicon spray did anything for me.

chief
10-17-2005, 08:32 PM
Starrett m1 oil and bags of dessicant in the drawers of your tool box. My stuff look like new 30 thrity years later.

Dick Plasencia
10-17-2005, 08:52 PM
I'm in eastern Iowa and we have some violent changes in weather. I've had my machines actually drip water on the floor at times. But I don't have any rust on tools or machines. I spray everything likely to rust with a spray made of 90% kerosene or even gasoline (to dry fast) and 10% motor oil. I've had no success with WD-40 or anything else. The motor oil works great!
Using gasoline is not as dangerous as it seems. Don't smoke or have an open flame of course. But the thing is that the spray required is very light, don't have to drown the tools. So the gas eveporates real quick reducing the mess.

Dick

elbryant
10-17-2005, 09:03 PM
WD-40 and Silicon are only incidentally rust preventatives, and with weather changes here no amount of dessicant will work.
I have had the best luck with Boeshield T-9, developed by Boeing Aircraft, and then lining the drawers of my tool chest with VPI paper and keeping the drawers and top closed.

Ed

Paul F
10-17-2005, 10:02 PM
WD-40 is good if you're going to walk away from something for a day or two...
Beyond that, it's not worth much.

I've just started using LPS-3 spray-on rust preventative..
So far, it's been very good. Light oily and kinda waxy.
I sprayed a piece of steel and left it outside for a couple days... no rust. Harly a definitive test, but my area is only 2 miles from the pacific and we have condensing water falling out of the air pretty much every night all year long.

If I work in my shop in the winter, warm it up while I'm in it, and then leave... couple hours later as it cools down, there is water dripping off of my lathe and mill, and spots of water forming on any steel surface.
I'm hoping that the LPS-3 is going to help keep rust off my &#@* tools!

Paul F

maddmaxx65301
10-18-2005, 10:47 AM
This may sound bad but I'm glad that I'm not the only one that is frustrated with this problem. I have also tried WD-40 much to my disappointment. Dessicants don't last long at all. But I am very curious about the LPS product. Would you be so kind as to give me more information.

Your Old Dog
10-18-2005, 10:57 AM
I was curious too.....

http://www.lpslabs.com/Products/CorrosionInh/Lps3.asp

Evan
10-18-2005, 11:43 AM
Go to the grocery store and buy a jug of silica gel kitty litter (cheap). Put a cupful in a paper lunch bag and put it in with the tools. Bake the bag in the oven at 250 for an hour or two every 6 months to renew it.



[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 10-18-2005).]

gwinn
10-18-2005, 12:34 PM
Guys:

You may like LPS-3 as I do for semi-permanent corrosion fighting, but is not what you want for fairly regular use. It is waxy and almost hard to clean off the tools when you want to use them. Great for stuff you leave in the rain for three years, but not what we all want here.

Gwinn

Luke55
10-18-2005, 12:54 PM
For myself I use Jhonson paste wax for floor on table of wood machines and Starret M1 for metalworking machines. Never had rust since

maddmaxx65301
10-18-2005, 01:01 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by gwinn:
Guys:

You may like LPS-3 as I do for semi-permanent corrosion fighting, but is not what you want for fairly regular use. It is waxy and almost hard to clean off the tools when you want to use them. Great for stuff you leave in the rain for three years, but not what we all want here.

Gwinn</font>

That answered my question of how user friendly it (LPS) is. Have you tried Starrett M1? I have rust problems with items left unattended for as little as a week.

Dick Plasencia
10-18-2005, 01:44 PM
Obviously great resistance to cheap and effective in preference to name brand product of questionable attributes. Motor oil is more user friendly in my shop and I don't mind wiping it up or getting it on my hands. But I suppose that in 72 years one stands to learn at least one useful thing.

Dick

Leigh
10-18-2005, 02:50 PM
LPS-3 works great on any surface that doesn't require a precision fit or finish. That includes tools in a tool box. It's rated for two years, but that's in an outdoor environment.

Yes it does create a waxy coating... that's what it's paid to do. Better than a rusty coating http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//eek.gif

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Leigh W3NLB

Paul F
10-18-2005, 02:56 PM
Better than a rusty coating.
That's my feeling exactly!

Most of the stuff I plan on using it on, things that only come out of my toolbox every few months, or things too big to be IN a toolbox, I don't care if it takes me 20 minutes with a rag and some solvent to clean the LPS off of it, I AM SICK AND TIRED OF VERY LIGHTLY USED TOOLS GETTING CRUSTED WITH RUST!

My "best" and only 2-3" micrometer is pretty much wrecked (at least asthetically) from sitting in my toolbox, not measuring anything, for 3 years. Opened it's nice wooden box to to find rust all over it.

Never again. If I have to buy something like LPS-3 by the 5 gallon BUCKET and DUNK everything in my shop.. never again.

That's how rust has ticked me off...
Paul F.

Leigh
10-18-2005, 08:19 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Paul F:
...I don't care if it takes me 20 minutes with a rag and some solvent to clean the LPS off of it...</font>

Hi Paul,

In most cases you don't have to clean the LPS off at all. Just use the tool. And re-spray any coating that is removed with use.

The only exception is where you need the clean metal surface for gauging or something similar... in that case you clean the area of use, and leave the coating on the remainder.

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Leigh W3NLB

andy_b
10-18-2005, 10:11 PM
i don't know if this is an option, but why not leave the heat on? i never heated my garage/shop unless i was going to be in there for a day, and then i'd turn the heat on in the morning or the night before. last year i got sick and tired of the surface rust and condensation, so i turned the heat on all winter (only about 45F or so). i figure it cost me $200 last year, and this year will probably cost $375 with fuel price increases. for me it is worth $1 a day to avoid the rust problems.

if you don't have a way to at least keep SOME heat in the location your tools are stored, then this wouldn't be an option.

andy b.

speedy
10-19-2005, 05:17 AM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//confused.gif

[This message has been edited by speedy (edited 10-19-2005).]

speedy
10-19-2005, 05:32 AM
double post

[This message has been edited by speedy (edited 10-19-2005).]

speedy
10-19-2005, 05:35 AM
I`m using a lanolin based lubricant/rust preventative on my tools. I have previously used LPS 3 and have absolutely no complaints about it. Lanolin based products are cheaper and healthier I believe. This stuff goes a long way and my hands have never been softer http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif.
Check out the MSDS on these products, lanolin looks to be the safest option and has a load of other uses also. Has anyone else had experience with it in the workshop?
FYI.
http://www.paddocklabs.com/forms/msds/lanolin.pdf

http://www.lpslabs.com/Products/MSDS/10316.pdf

http://msds.ehs.cornell.edu/msds/msdsdod/a93/m46089.htm

Here is some further info that you might find interesting/usefull; and I have no association with this crowd.

http://www.woolgrease.co.nz/facts.cfm

Ken

[This message has been edited by speedy (edited 10-19-2005).]

Leigh
10-19-2005, 08:04 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by andy_b:
...last year i got sick and tired of the surface rust and condensation, so i turned the heat on all winter (only about 45F or so)....</font>

By definition, to be an effective rust defense, the temperature must remain above the dew point. You can calculate that based on the humidity, but use the highest value you would expect, measured in the shop.

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Leigh W3NLB