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View Full Version : Delta/Milwaukee Toolmaker's Grinder - Need Help!



WLW-19958
05-24-2005, 04:28 PM
Hi There,

For many years, I've owned a "Delta / Milwaukee Toolmakers Grinder" and I would like someone with one of these machines to do me a favor.

I am missing the Instruction tag/plate on the end of the spindle housing. It isn't a big deal, I know, but the thread on etching metal got me thinking of making a replacement tag/plate for mine.

So, I need someone with a digital camera willing to take a picture of their tag and send it to me. A ruler set beside it for scale would be a help also. Anyone willing to help?

Thanks in advance!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

rkepler
05-24-2005, 06:31 PM
I can send you something, can't be sure about the quality. Let me know and I'll send some high-res pics.

precisionworks
05-24-2005, 06:56 PM
Be happy to take some photos. May be a month or so, I try to take an entire roll of film to the processor for a disc.

------------------
Barry Milton

trmungle
05-24-2005, 07:27 PM
Does the Toolmaker grinder do well as a surface grinder? I have often thought I would like to have one. Tom

WLW-19958
05-24-2005, 08:25 PM
Hi There,

Thanks for all the offers to help. Hopefully, this will work out.

As far as using the "Toolmaker" as a surface grinder, I have the "old model." I use it for small surface grinding projects and for my limited needs, it does just fine. The surface finish isn't as good as the higher end surface grinders produce. But my "Toolmaker" doesn't have the original "balanced" motor and I should replace the belt with a newer one. I was thinking of trying a link type belt. The finish shows scallops but they are less than .0001" and that is good enough for me. If I take a couple of very fine finish passes using a fine feed, The scallops don't show.

The "Toolmaker" is a kind of hybrid machine. With the Univise, Unihead, and Tool and Cutter Attachment, it is a very versatile machine. IMHO it is a good home-shop tool to have.

Thanks Again for the help!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

WLW-19958
11-12-2005, 02:00 AM
Hi There,

I've got the artwork for the missing tag almost done and I wanted to ask those more knowedgeable than I about etching. I have looked at a site that gives instructions on using PnP Blue mask on brass and then photo-etching with ferric chloride.

I would like to make my tag on aluminum. Can I use the the same process?

Thanks in advance!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

lklb
11-12-2005, 08:02 AM
I also have a Delta / Milwaukee grinder that is missing its tags. Is it possible for you to post the art work that you generated and perhaps some photos of the completed tag on the Dropbox?

http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/

I'm sure others would be interested in the process, and it would be there for years to reference.

I like that grinder and have a new 3 phase motor I am putting on. Mine has a crappy 1 phase rattle trap that someone grafted to it years ago.

Anyway, a real handy tool , and it's footprint doesn't take up too much shop space. goodluck.

MikeHenry
11-12-2005, 08:55 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Does the Toolmaker grinder do well as a surface grinder?</font>

A friend has the later style of this grinder with the enclosed base and the original balanced motor. His is almost like new in appearance and he paid a pretty penny for it, maybe $1500, delivered.

IMHO, the surface finish is acceptable for most hsm needs although there are definite ripples in the ground finish. He generally grinds dry, which might affect the finish he achieves.

Mike

lklb
11-12-2005, 09:53 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">His is almost like new in appearance and he paid a pretty penny for it, maybe $1500, delivered.</font>
Unless that machine came with EVERY attachment ever made for it, I think that is WAY too much money.( I. E...tilt table, centers, unihead, univise,fingers, collets, etc.)
Mine is old and I paid squat for it.A friend has a beauty, with everything and paid Much less than that.
Surface grinders are cheap, if you look you can get serious capabilities for $1500

nheng
11-12-2005, 12:29 PM
Webb, On aluminum, you'll need something other than the pcb etchant.

I've looked into local trophy shops and they seem to be able to do black on silver, gold or whatever using 3m photosensitive materials. Various thicknesses are available.

The local shop was talking around $20 for an 8x10 ... and whatever you can fit on it http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Den

WLW-19958
11-12-2005, 01:11 PM
Hi There,

I haven't thought of the trophy shop idea. I wanted to try this myself. Maybe I'll make the first one out of brass just to see if it works.

I'll see if I can get a picture posted:

Test Tag (http://home.comcast.net/~wlw-19958/Test-Tag-2.jpg)

Thanks for all your input!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Steve Stube
11-12-2005, 01:38 PM
Webb, I gather that you want to make your own tag for it but I'm curious if you contacted Delta about the cost of a replacment tag.

WLW-19958
11-12-2005, 04:03 PM
Hi There,

When I contacted Delta years ago, I was told it was no longer available.

-Blue Chips-
Webb

Steve Stube
11-12-2005, 04:26 PM
I was thinking you probably checked it out but thought I would ask.

I was successful getting a new set of Al placards for a machine built in the 60's. It was from another company and the 10 or 12 tags were very reasonable and they even stamped the serial numbers from the photo of my old tags I had sent them.

I have a Delta Rockwell Ram drill press I want to replace all the tags and decals on, I sure hope Delta can help on that one but if not I might just be twisting your arm until you give-up the details of your process:-)

WLW-19958
11-12-2005, 04:40 PM
Hi There,

Another thought occurred to me. Perhaps I could get some art transfer material that I could use my printer to print the art and then transfer to the aluminum and seal with a clear coat. I remember reading of people making calibrated dials this way.

Anybody know of such a material and where I could get some?

Thanks Again for all the Help!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

nheng
11-12-2005, 05:51 PM
also added - I need to take back my comment on the pcb etchant not being suitable for aluminum. I thought I'd had poor results with it but it was many years ago http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//eek.gif Numerous posts on the newsgroups indicate that it works on aluminum.
---
The blue PnP material used for pc boards is laser printed then ironed onto a well scrubbed (comet or other cleanser) copper substrate.

It can be ironed onto anything and I've even tried wood. It is a bold, dark blue against whatever background you have, or inverse print the art if you want.

Here's an article (perhaps the one mentioned above) on brass nameplate making:

http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/archive/0403/0403_feature1.html


[This message has been edited by nheng (edited 11-12-2005).]

gizmo2
11-12-2005, 06:38 PM
I work in a trophy shop, and you can get it laser engraved for a pretty reasonable cost. And the quality is quite good. Black brass or black aluminum run about the same money, anodized black aluminum costs a bit more but is tougher. If you WANT to make it yourself then by all means do. We make stuff like this on a pretty regular basis. One customer we have restores old car radios, and we silk screen and/or laser new glass dials for him. If you decide to go this route, you might stop in and see what file formats they prefer to use; they might prefer to have the printed artwork instead.

MikeHenry
11-13-2005, 08:09 AM
iklb,

It did come with most of the attachments, maybe even all of them. It would be hard to find a better example of the tool, I think. Whether or not it is worth the money is a matter between the seller and buyer.

I do know that some of the "bargains" I've picked up have been far more expensive in the end than some of his "overpriced" tools, both in money and especially in time.

Mike

lklb
11-13-2005, 10:13 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">I do know that some of the "bargains" I've picked up have been far more expensive in the end than some of his "overpriced" tools, both in money and especially in time.

Mike
</font>

Of course your right,Mike.It just 'gets me' sometimes to see people pay way too much for VERY old and wornout machinery. At least in New England, it's very much a buyers market,people really should remember that. There ain't that many crazys like us lookin' for that stuff,especially considering the thought of moving 800-10,000 lb. toys....

quasi
11-13-2005, 02:31 PM
I have always gladly payed more than " the going rate" for a machine in excellent to new shape, and or with lots of acsesories. It pays off in the long term.