PDA

View Full Version : Steam Engine



deanrach
09-04-2005, 08:43 PM
I have attached a few images of a steam engine which my second year students produced. They actually made 8 of these little beauties - 100% CNC machined.

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0513Image0003.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0513Image0004.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0513Image0005.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0513Image0006.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0513Image0008.jpg

------------------
Northern Maine Community College
HAAS Technical Education Center

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 09-04-2005).]

John Stevenson
09-04-2005, 08:49 PM
Very small aren't they http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

darryl
09-04-2005, 08:54 PM
Must'of used a .001 endmill, as I can't see them either. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

deanrach
09-04-2005, 09:00 PM
Unfortunately I can't attach images - help.

Buckshot
09-04-2005, 09:28 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by deanrach:
Unfortunately I can't attach images - help.</font>

........Your photo's have to be hosted somewhere on the web that will allow you to create an address for each one.

In your post you type in and , then you paste the address in between them with no spaces. The servers here do not actually HAVE the photo stored. By putting in the 2 bracketed things it tells the computer to go to that address and get the photo to display in your post.

Hope I didn't make it more confusing as I really like to see the steam engines [img]http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Rick

Mcgyver
09-04-2005, 09:34 PM
It’s real easy, go to photobucket.com, set up a free account, follow your nose to up the images and cut and past the image link into your post here. It will be self apparent as you go through the photobucket screens. Oh yeah, most prefer the pics are no scaled to no more than 600 pixels wide, that keeps from having to horizontal scroll to read every post in the thread

deanrach
09-04-2005, 09:55 PM
I have added a few live shots and CAM application as well - enjoy :&gt; )

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0508Image0005.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0601Image0029.jpg

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0508Image0015.jpg


[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 09-04-2005).]

BillH
09-04-2005, 10:00 PM
Very nice, the milling center did a good job.

Bond
09-04-2005, 11:01 PM
Nice work

IOWOLF
09-05-2005, 08:01 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
Very nice, the milling center did a good job.</font>

I agree, programing a part is not as satisfing as makeing each piece your self.
Why stop at four, or fourty, and cheapen it some more?
Oh and it is a air engine, isnt it?


------------------
The tame Wolf !

JIMofalltrades031
09-05-2005, 10:01 AM
Once again the Detail police have had to come in and "Rodney King" the man for being proud that his students had accomplished something to do with machining. Man you are really starting to come across as a small person. Oh and I know you are just stating the truth about the kid's project. Just didn't have to be voiced. Personally I think it is great to get them started into the field. JUST maybe some of them will go on to greater and greater things. Unless this kick in the teeth by those who should know better sends them off to be something less. How about you bump it up a notch and show some pictures of your projects?

Mcgyver
09-05-2005, 11:11 AM
yeah, jeez, lets encourage some metal working content, didn't your mother ever teach you if you have nothing nice to say don't say anything at all? They are student projects not entries at a model engineering show.

I'm impressed the kids today know what a steam engine is and a college course in metal working would have to have a cnc emphasis to be relevant today - thanks for sharing what you are doing.

[This message has been edited by Mcgyver (edited 09-05-2005).]

pgmrdan
09-05-2005, 11:21 AM
deanrach,

They did a nice job! I'm impressed.

Thanks for posting.

[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-05-2005).]

deanrach
09-05-2005, 11:36 AM
Maybe I'm a bit thick ........... Did you just take a swing at me? I am a recent subscriber to "The Home Shop Machinist" and am very impressed with the content of the magazine; both written as well as the quality of workmanship and attention to detail on those projects, which have been reviewed. I thought folks may enjoy the work of students who have made a decision to work in the trade. Unfortunately, that was my only motivation.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JIMofalltrades031:
Once again the Detail police have had to come in and "Rodney King" the man for being proud that his students had accomplished something to do with machining. Man you are really starting to come across as a small person. Oh and I know you are just stating the truth about the kid's project. Just didn't have to be voiced. Personally I think it is great to get them started into the field. JUST maybe some of them will go on to greater and greater things. Unless this kick in the teeth by those who should know better sends them off to be something less. How about you bump it up a notch and show some pictures of your projects?</font>



[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 09-05-2005).]

pgmrdan
09-05-2005, 11:42 AM
deanrach,

Don't take it seriously. One or two of them are making subtle digs that no one cares about.

What you quoted is a scolding for them.

They have a reputation here. After a while you'll begin to recognize the rare occassion when they say something useful. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

[This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 09-05-2005).]

deanrach
09-05-2005, 11:55 AM
It's not a matter of "mass production". Students are taught the basics in the first year on conventional machines. My goal is not to produce button pushers, but rather students with entry-level skills that will have the opportunity to succeed as machinists in the industry. They have a great number of conventional machining projects, which teach them about operations planning, setup, speeds, feeds, depth of cut, etc. It is these skills, which they rely upon to devlop logical machining programs and operations to complete such a complicated project as the "Steam Engine". It is a steam engine, they decided to operate them using compressed air.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
I agree, programing a part is not as satisfing as makeing each piece your self.
Why stop at four, or fourty, and cheapen it some more?
Oh and it is a air engine, isnt it?


</font>

pgmrdan
09-05-2005, 12:58 PM
deanrach,

Seriously, don't sweat it!

Everyone knows miniature steam engines are usually run on compressed air. He's just searching for your hot button.

Ignore him! The rest of us ignore him when necessary.

Life is too short to give it a second thought.

Have a nice day! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

IOWOLF
09-05-2005, 05:36 PM
Dan don't sweat it,I know that I have a Bad habbit of Telling the truth, and a steam engine when run on air is an "compressed air engine". And those kids are in there late teens or early twentys arent they?
But dont give it a second thought,and as for Detail police,I have learned from the best, THRUD being one of them,No that wasn't a slam on THRUD,Quite the opposite.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

sid pileski
09-05-2005, 05:48 PM
Deanrach- Hey,I think the models are nice!
Ya know, I made a lot of engines and parts for things on my old 8 speed BP and lathe, but once I bought my 2.5 axis prototrak mill, my level and quality of work has gone up a few notches. I use ProE to design my parts and out put files as I need them. I think some people my view that as I kind of "cheating?"
But whats the real point? Are You and the kids learning? Having Fun? Making something that is usefull?
Also, I've built boilers for my "steam engines", but I can't run them at indoor shows. So they have to run on air. Keep up the good work. I get no more or less joy from looking at a finely crafted piece of well designed,thought out, CNC'd work as seeing something that was made by a person that was finely designed, thought out manualy made work!

Well done!
Sid

Ozarks Hermit
09-05-2005, 06:22 PM
Really nice to see this.

It gets very frustrating to see what many of todays young people are into - - - no need to go into detail.

Keep up the good work, and kudos to you and your students.

Ken

PHiers
09-05-2005, 06:52 PM
Very nice engines, you should be proud of your students. I have a hunch you are a top notch teacher.

For Wolf: A steam engine run on air is still a steam engine! All you have to do is provide a source of steam, no modications needed. Much as gas and diesel engines are both internal combustion engines even tho they use different fuels.

Just my 2 cents


------------------
Paul in NE Ohio

BillH
09-05-2005, 06:54 PM
They must of done a very nice job with the cad software.

IOWOLF
09-05-2005, 07:02 PM
Then what is a Sterling engine? A hot air engine.
Never mind, It isn't important.I stand corrected,BFD.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

pgmrdan
09-05-2005, 07:33 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
Dan don't sweat it,I know that I have a Bad habbit of Telling the truth, and a steam engine when run on air is an "compressed air engine". And those kids are in there late teens or early twentys arent they?
But dont give it a second thought,and as for Detail police,I have learned from the best, THRUD being one of them,No that wasn't a slam on THRUD,Quite the opposite.

</font>

Translation: Dan blah blah blah, blah. Blah blah blah blah, blah blah, blah blah blah. Blah blah blah............

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

IOWOLF
09-05-2005, 07:46 PM
Dan,I guess you are the one trying to PUSH BUTTONs.NOW get over it And practice what you preach, Don't give it a second thought.


-----------------------

The Wolf

------------------
The tame Wolf !

John Stevenson
09-05-2005, 07:47 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
Dan doesn't sweat it,ah knows thet ah have a Bad habbit of Tellyng th' truth, an' a steam ingine when helter-skelter on air is an "compressed air ingine". An' them kids is in thar late teens o' early twentys arent they? But dont give it a second thunk,an' as fo' Detail po-lice,ah have larned fum th' best, THRUD bein' one of them,No thet warn't a slam on THRUD,Quite th' opposite. ------------------ Th' tame Wo'f ! Fry mah hide!

</font>

IOWOLF
09-05-2005, 07:50 PM
John, that is not what I said.
Can you quit being a Dick? or is this Impossible for you.
And if you don't like what I say, Ignore it don't become the problem.

[This message has been edited by IOWOLF (edited 09-05-2005).]

mochinist
09-05-2005, 07:50 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
They must of done a very nice job with the cad software.</font>

Yeah what a waste to train students on cad/cam and cnc setup, a real class would teach them how to use a old southbend's, then they could have fun in their garage, why learn something that is a fact of life in the modern machine shop.

Seriously anyone who thinks learning and using a cad/cad system and then setting up the part to be ran on the cnc is an easy task is a dumbass who has never done it. I can run manuals and cnc there is a definate skill for both(manual is more fun), but there is no need to knock some college kids learning cnc and programming something fun to show their friend's and relatives.


P.S. Nice engines how bout posting the plans.

BillH
09-05-2005, 08:20 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by mochinist:
Yeah what a waste to train students on cad/cam and cnc setup, a real class would teach them how to use a old southbend's, then they could have fun in their garage, why learn something that is a fact of life in the modern machine shop.

Seriously anyone who thinks learning and using a cad/cad system and then setting up the part to be ran on the cnc is an easy task is a dumbass who has never done it. I can run manuals and cnc there is a definate skill for both(manual is more fun), but there is no need to knock some college kids learning cnc and programming something fun to show their friend's and relatives.


P.S. Nice engines how bout posting the plans.</font>

Uh, thats why I said they must of done a nice job with the cad software.

mochinist
09-05-2005, 08:34 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by BillH:
Uh, thats why I said they must of done a nice job with the cad software.</font>


Uh well it takes more than cad/cam software to get a nice part, many of the same skills apply to a cnc machinist that apply to a manual machinist. You can try going with the speeds and feeds that the program will tell you to use, but they are generally off, and they need to be right when they are downloaded to the machine because it is not as easy to change like on a manual. You also need to think about things like fixturing and clamp avoidance before hand so you don't have a crash.

charlie coghill
09-05-2005, 08:53 PM
Deanrach;
Great work. Wish that you could teach me CNC. I could program the machine and go have a beer while the machine is doing my work. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

I have watch a small machine make a connecting rod. It was real interesting.
Charlie

deanrach
09-05-2005, 09:10 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by mochinist:

P.S. Nice engines how bout posting the plans.</font>

It's actually a reverse-engineered version of the P.M. Research Model 2A Oscillating Steam Engine. We had their blessing (copyright) to do what we did. I purchased a kit, which came with a print containing some of the machining dimensions. The students did not use any of the supplied parts from P.M. Research, but rather developed their own components froms scratch.

I have attached their link below.

http://www.pmresearchinc.com/store/customer/home.php?cat=4



[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 09-05-2005).]

ricksplace
09-05-2005, 09:19 PM
Deanrach -good on ya. Showcasing your students' work is one of the best motivators a teacher can do for a student. Three cheers for ya. There should be more teachers out there like you.

Someone who cuts down a student's work without acknowledging the student's effort or offering constructive criticism so the student can learn and improve does nothing to motivate the student. Some people thrive on being destructive to and critical of others.

That's nice work. I couldn't do it.

Being a teacher myself, I know the time and effort you as the teacher put into that project. Those students now have a skill they didn't have before they met you. Bravo.

Rick

ps. I think it was Confuscious (sp?) that said

"The highest compliment a teacher can receive is when the skill level of the student surpasses that of the teacher"

plm
09-05-2005, 09:33 PM
deanrach,

I know you are very proud of your students; they did a great job!

The teacher also did a good job and you should give yourself a pat on the back!

Keep up the good work!

Thank You,

plm

[This message has been edited by plm (edited 09-05-2005).]

deanrach
09-09-2005, 08:52 PM
Everyone, thank you for all the kind words. I'm glad you enjoyed the pictures. If there is anything my students can make for you, please let me know.

IOWOLF
09-10-2005, 06:39 AM
If they grow up to be assets to the community that would be fine with me.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

PHiers
09-10-2005, 08:24 PM
For those that don't know this is the engine I built as per the PM casting for that engine.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v503/PHiers/100_0112.jpg

I think I like the students version better. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

------------------
Paul in NE Ohio

[This message has been edited by PHiers (edited 09-10-2005).]

bikenut
09-10-2005, 11:14 PM
Nice job, both you and the students. I made a similar engine way back when I was a senior in HS, still have it. Last year I built a pair of them for a couple of kids who are interested in mechanical devices. I made the main body and cylinder from Lexan so they could see what is happening inside. Got to encourage the young ones.

deanrach
09-11-2005, 02:36 PM
Paul,

Nice work. If you have any ideas for student projects, please share them with me.



<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by PHiers:
For those that don't know this is the engine I built as per the PM casting for that engine.
</font>



[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 09-11-2005).]

mochinist
09-11-2005, 02:52 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by deanrach:
Paul,

Nice work. If you have any ideas for student projects, please share them with me.</font>

Small hammer, screw jacks, set of punches, 1-2-3 blocks, parralel's. There are plans for all of these out there, and if you can't find them it would be pretty easy to reverse engineer any of those and make up some prints. This is all stuff you can use whether or not you are a manual or cnc machinist.

deanrach
09-13-2005, 11:33 AM
Yup, but I'm also looking for other challenging project ideas.

greywynd
09-13-2005, 12:42 PM
I'd have to guess that some fellows didn't read the whole post, he mentioned that the students had to do other conventional projects as well as the CNC. In today' world, a lot of the time consuming maching is being replaced with CNC.....even a lot of the one-offs and repair items. Most shops have the rotary tables and dividing heads collecting dust, if they have them at all. Between CNC mills, lathes, and ram/wire edm, there's not much that can't be done. I've talked to tradesmen that have never used a dividing head, and haven't used a rotary table in years, most of that stuff is being done with CNC now instead. If these students don't know CNC, they'll have a hard time getting employment. Of course, as a lot of you know, they also need to know the basics. I for one would have a hard time teaching these days, most schools have had the budgets cut back, but the topics are more....and the costs are high. Most of the high schools in our area don't even have shops any more, it's a shame. (I blame some of that on the emphasis for kids to all go to university....to become academics and the like. While we do need them, who is going to build the stuff? Oops, I keep forgetting, we're just letting china build it for us.)

Great project, and keep up the good work.

Mark

PolskiFran
09-13-2005, 09:42 PM
Great work! I wish we would have had plans for a small engine when I was in the vo-tech shop. I would have been 15 years ahead in the model building area. We had plans for punch sets, meat tenderizers, can openers, etc.

I'm a firm believer in the "Run What Ya Brung" theory. If you have manual equipment, use it. If you have CNC, or access to CNC, make use of it.

Congrats,
Frank

deanrach
11-20-2005, 05:48 PM
I thought I would revive this post by adding a few more images. Hope you all enjoy. If you would like more, please let me know. Also, if there are specific applications you would like to see, please do not hesitate to request them.

HAAS/NMCC Demo Day 1
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/demoday-pmm.jpg

HAAS SL20 Lathe w/Live Tooling
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0412Image0075.jpg

HAAS SL10 Chucker & Bar Lathe
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0412Image0080.jpg

2nd Year Students - Spring '05
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0412Image0079.jpg

2nd Year Student - Spring '05
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0412Image0077.jpg


[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-20-2005).]

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-20-2005).]

charlie coghill
11-20-2005, 08:24 PM
Dean I for one enjoy the pic. So keep them comming.
Charlie

nheng
11-20-2005, 08:35 PM
Dean, Nice pictures and good work by your students. When I cross the street to a high end CNC shop that does some of our work, I don't ask who can run manual machines. I expect the CNC guys to get my parts out, to tight specs, at a decent price.

The only time I've asked about manual machines was with some 13" parts recently. The question then was if anyone could hold TIR under 0.001" on all "coaxial" features of the part including periphery features which were not going to be easy to workhold.

Den

deanrach
11-20-2005, 09:06 PM
Den,

Thanks. If you don't mind my asking, what kind of parts? My students do occasionally take-on industry projects. As a matter of fact, we will be completing one for a "Home Shop Machinist" member.

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-20-2005).]

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-20-2005).]

spkrman15
11-20-2005, 09:54 PM
Nice work,

do you have pictures of "the other" projects you are doing?

Rob http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

J Tiers
11-20-2005, 10:28 PM
I think the little engines are nice.....All a steam version needs is an in-line oiler, so beans on the complainers.....

There is certainly a "craftsmanship" issue with CNC, but I would ask why stop there?

After all, on a manual machine part of the job is already taken care of for you.... moving cutter in straight line, spinning work or cutting tool, etc....

For "real" craftsmanship, you lazy bums who use machine tools should do it all with hand saws, and files. In fact you should make your own files and saws.

Only then can you really claim that the ultimate in "handcrafting" was done.

No I do not practice what I have just preached..... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 11-20-2005).]

Orrin
11-21-2005, 09:37 AM
Deanrach, thank you for posting the pictures. I think the pictures and steam engine project are outstanding! I envy both you and your students not only for having access to CNC machines, but the opportunity to learn how to run them.

A nearby high school has an excellent machine shop program. Many of the lathes are WW-II vintage, but they do have a tiny CNC lathe and one other machining center.

I thought the CNC lathe was little more than a toy until I attended their open house. They were turning out parts for small steam engines much like the ones you show here. I quickly learned I was wrong. Their CNC machines are not toys at all!

To raise money, the class sells their steam engines mounted on an attractive walnut base. I'm proud to say we've supported their program by buying some of their projects at silent auction. We display the steam engine in our living room's curio cabinet.

A friend of ours runs his high school engine on steam. You bet your life it is a steam engine. Just because it can also run on air does not detract from it, at all.

Best regards,

Orrin

Evan
11-21-2005, 11:29 AM
I find all this comment on air vs steam suprising. Read here about air powered locomotives:

http://www.aircaraccess.com/pics02.htm

IOWOLF
11-21-2005, 02:11 PM
So Evan,what your stand on this long dead subject?

------------------
The tame Wolf !

Evan
11-21-2005, 02:34 PM
OK, let's stir it up a bit. If you look at the details of the cylinders on the air loco you find it has fins. Not cooling fins but heat absorbing fins to gain heat from the atmosphere to help expand the air. This is opposite of a steam engine in which the cylinders are insulated to prevent loss of heat from the steam. So, a properly constructed air engine is a poor steam engine and a properly constructed steam engine is a poor air engine.

So, although a steam engine can run on air it isn't really an air engine and vice versa.

IOWOLF
11-21-2005, 02:41 PM
Well, now thats all straightend out........

Thanx Evan,

------------------
The tame Wolf !

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:40 AM
Here are a few images for your viewing pleasure. I'm a bit off the topic of steam engines at this point, but I'll keep them coming if you want.

KURT 675 Mill Vise - Jaw Plates
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0317Image0032.jpg

DEMO Project
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0414Image0004.jpg

Student Demonstration Project - Custom Canned Cycle
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0414Image0008.jpg

Student Demonstration Project - Completed
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_0414Image0010.jpg

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:47 AM
On occassion, we will take-on industry projects. I do this so students are exposed to a variety of work and the associated deadlines. The amount of industry support we have received is outstanding!

Custom Valve Covers - Engraving
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2.jpg

Custom Valve Covers - Engraving
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/3.jpg

Custom Valve Covers - Engraving
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/0735fdc1.jpg

Custom Valve Covers - Engraving
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/e7fd9ead.jpg

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-24-2005).]

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:51 AM
Here are a few project drawings.

KURT 675 Jaw Plate
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/1bd24a29.jpg

HAAS SL10 CNC Lathe Coolant Block
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/91a40d0b.jpg

Standard T&G Soft Jaws
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/fb121871.jpg

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-24-2005).]

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:54 AM
A few images of the gage crib.

Gage Crib
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture172.jpg

Gage Crib
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture171.jpg

Gage Crib
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture170.jpg

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:57 AM
A few images of the CNC Lab.

HAAS Technical Education Center
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture303.jpg

CNC Lab
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture306.jpg

CNC Lab
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/Picture305.jpg



[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-24-2005).]

deanrach
11-24-2005, 10:06 AM
A few more industry projects. In many cases, students are also required to design a fabricate work-holding fixtures.

Double-D Wrench - Completed
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/29ec8f76.jpg

Double-D Wrench Fixture
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/824bf7d7.jpg

Double-D Wrench - 1st Operation
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/33befc07.jpg

Shift Link
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_1031Image0022.jpg

Shift Link - Work-Holding
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b68/deanrach/2005_1031Image0024.jpg

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-24-2005).]

IOWOLF
11-24-2005, 06:04 PM
As a personal preference I like kurt jaws a full 6". the lips are useful for a multitude of things,like to hold paralell clamps.

But hey, It's your class.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

deanrach
11-24-2005, 07:24 PM
IOWOLF

I can always expect you to come out and play. That's good, everybody is entitled to an opinion.

[This message has been edited by deanrach (edited 11-24-2005).]

IOWOLF
11-24-2005, 07:49 PM
Who is playing?

------------------
The tame Wolf !

deanrach
11-24-2005, 09:17 PM
IOWOLF

So, what do think of the lab? How about the valve covers?

BobWarfield
11-24-2005, 10:54 PM
deanrach--what great fun!

i'm taking a community college tig welding course and enjoying every minute of getting back into school. i sure wish i could find a machinist program anywhere near the santa cruz, ca area as i would take that too!

one of the things i am curious about on the cnc side, is whether you can ever really stand to be without manual machines? is everything faster and better cnc'd, or do you need both?

it appears to be straightforward to convert a machine to cnc, at least compared to similar projects i have messed with, so i am very tempted.

sometimes i find myself wishing for the best of both worlds.

best regards,

bw

IOWOLF
11-25-2005, 05:44 AM
Well, I am happy to see that HAAS has set you up with a "up to date"shop.Do you lease them,own, or was it a GIMME.
Doesn't matter,your guys will learn quite a bit from a CNC class,just dont totally get away from manual machines,they will always be around and have a need.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

Your Old Dog
11-25-2005, 07:04 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by sid pileski:
Deanrach- Hey,I think the models are nice!
Ya know, I made a lot of engines and parts for things on my old 8 speed BP and lathe, but once I bought my 2.5 axis prototrak mill, my level and quality of work has gone up a few notches. I use ProE to design my parts and out put files as I need them. I think some people my view that as I kind of "cheating?"
But whats the real point? Are You and the kids learning? Having Fun? Making something that is usefull?
Also, I've built boilers for my "steam engines", but I can't run them at indoor shows. So they have to run on air. Keep up the good work. I get no more or less joy from looking at a finely crafted piece of well designed,thought out, CNC'd work as seeing something that was made by a person that was finely designed, thought out manualy made work!

Well done!
Sid</font>

I agree. As world class firearms engraver Lynton MacKenzie once said, "what does it matter how the chips get on the floor as long as the right ones get there?"

Anybody read the classifieds lately? I was wanting a second front job and looking for an ad like....Wanted, one machist who has absolutly no experiance with CNC technology. Must have 10 years experiance. Starting pay negotiatable. Not one posting like that could be found.

Dean don't get po'd and split. After you've been here a little while you get to know where everyone is coming from. You'll find most will support you and then there will be some who need support at others expense. You'll find some who just want to be part of the group and chime in with useless info. And some who you seldom hear from but have the most to contribute. After a year on the board I am constantly amazed at some of the info posted up here. And, I might add, I'm amazed that for the amount of folks who cruise here that we don't have more wild hairs around http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

As to your project: Wish I was in your class!

Posting note: The picture size determines the screen size on most of our computers. If they are too large we have to scroll each sentance to read the entire thing. Resize your pic's a bit and we won't need the horizoontal scroll.

[This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 11-25-2005).]

deanrach
11-25-2005, 08:36 AM
IOWOLF

We own 3 of the 4 HAAS machines. The 2 MiniMills and SL10 Bar & Chucker belong to the Community College, along with 4 CNC Trainers/Simulators. The HAAS SL20, is entrusted to us and is replaced with current technology every two years. We are one of the newest HTEC's so we have not yet experienced the swap-out of entrusted equipment. In addition to the SL20, HAAS donated 2 trainers and has entrusted 2 more. They are great for instruction and allow students to learn the control quickly without encumbering equipment. As for manual machining, this is how all of my students begin. Most will spend at least a year in front of manual mills and lathes before being exposed to any CNC. This exposure will increase in the future, once my manual and CNC labs are merged into one.

IOWOLF
11-25-2005, 11:28 AM
Now that I like,good work,on the students.

The _______engines look good also, you should sell them to buy more manual machines,as no one will donate those thiese days.

------------------
The tame Wolf !