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crews1
11-29-2005, 05:36 PM
The thread about using a dial bore prompted me to ask something that I have wondered about for a while.

What is the difference between a gauge and a gage (spelled without a 'U')?

<pastes>
Definitions of Gage - 1). Gauge is the spelling used in Great Britain but finds some use in the US It is chiefly found for nonlinear measurement instruments (fluid gages, etc.). However, it is finding increased use for coordinate measuring machines where it designates a device with a proportional range and some form of indicator.
2). an instrument or device for measuring, indicating or comparing a physical characteristic.
3). gauge: a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc
Definitions of Gauge - 1). a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc.
2).# accepted or approved instance or example of a quantity or quality against which others are judged or measured or compared
# determine the capacity, volume, or contents of by measurement and calculation; "gauge the wine barrels"
3). # measure precisely and against a standard; "the wire is gauged"
# adapt to a specified measurement; "gauge the instruments"
# the thickness of wire
4). In engineering, a gauge is used to make measurements. Various types of gauges include: * Bore gauge* Feeler gauge* Fishtail-Center gauge* Go-NoGo gauge* Gauge blocks* Radius gauge* Thread pitch* Vernier height gauge.

FWIW, it seems that I have noticed gauge used more in conjection with a device that has moving parts, and gage seems to be used more with devices that *don't* have moving parts, i.e., jo-blocks, ring or plug thread gages, etc. But I'd like to learn the proper usage from people much more knowledgable with the terminology.

Thanks.

IOWOLF
11-29-2005, 06:17 PM
Most people know what you are talking about either way.
Like pOtAtO or potato(pronounced potahto).

IMHO

------------------
The tame Wolf !

topct
11-29-2005, 07:00 PM
Interesting, the Machinery's Handbook(twentieth edition) uses "gage".

I don't have any idea why I use gauge. I do have a Union Tool Co. thread gauge however. Maybe it's because it has moving parts ie, the leafs. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

------------------
Gene

charliechitlins
11-29-2005, 07:22 PM
Thread gauge.
Small hole gage.
Some things seem to get one or the other.

timz1999
11-29-2005, 08:28 PM
I think it is like the word
tire or as they say across the pond tyre.

wierdscience
11-29-2005, 08:58 PM
Gage is also used as a persons name.

chief
11-29-2005, 09:03 PM
Guage is the correct spelling.

Gage has an entirely different meaning i.e.
a token of defiance, had you had to endure my 6th grade english teacher you would know this.

topct
11-29-2005, 09:15 PM
Guagenestinklestenerismflemistinkopoopaw.

A noun. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Forrest Addy
11-29-2005, 09:48 PM
The way I learned it: "guage" is a verb and "gage" is the noun: "Hand me that gage so I can guage the thread" Over my lifetime usage has been converging on "gage" as acceptable for both.

It's hair splitting for any but purists and people like me who love words.

crews1
11-29-2005, 10:04 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">
Guage is the correct spelling. </font>
So now I have a third word to contend with - guage versus gauge versus gage?? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

Thanks for the replies - I guess it's a distinction without a difference.

J Tiers
11-29-2005, 11:41 PM
If you want another, how about "Align" vs "Aline"....

Another one of those that has textbooks on both sides of the issue.....

sauer38h
11-29-2005, 11:52 PM
I don't believe it's application-specific, but rather user-specific. The Merriam-Webster Second Unabridged has the good sense to agree with me. By user-specific I mean that some people use "gage" on all occasions, some use "gauge". The great practical advantage to spelling it "gage" is that you will never accidently type it "guage", which is not a word in English.

John Stevenson
11-30-2005, 04:51 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by chief:
Guage is the correct spelling.

</font>

Only if you are dyslectic http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Timleech
11-30-2005, 04:53 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by chief:
Guage is the correct spelling.
</font>

I don't think so http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Gage is a form of plum http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Tim

speedy
11-30-2005, 05:25 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by IOWOLF:
Most people know what you are talking about either way.
Like pOtAtO or potato(pronounced potahto).MHO</font>

And if you run them together at 45 or 60 degree intervals you have a Harley.

Ken

Randy
11-30-2005, 08:40 AM
I wondered about that several years ago, and came up with my own answer after perusing many tool catalogs and a few dictionaries. The convention I use (which is pretty consistant, though not hard and fast) is this: For a dimension, such as a sheet metal thickness or wire diameter, I use "gauge." For a measuring tool I use "gage," e.g. gage block, or plug gage.

Mike Gibson
11-30-2005, 08:54 AM
Direct from the PC Dictionary
Gage- alternate spelling of gauge to prevent loss of self-esteem if not able to spell gauge. LMAO

J Tiers
11-30-2005, 09:20 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Timleech:
I don't think so http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Gage is a form of plum http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Tim

</font>

When its green, I believe.......


Or its something on your helmet

Or flung in your face

Or used to measure a part..........

Norman Atkinson
11-30-2005, 09:22 AM
'Gage' is non u.

Oh! for a classical education.

Norm.

Frank Ford
11-30-2005, 11:01 AM
I think it's really simpler than all that. As the current owners and trainers of the world's most diverse, complex (way more words than any other), and fluid lanquage we must contend with constant change. English is the closest there is to an international common language, and we're adding new words all the time.

There are countless examples. Recently we've seen "their" make a change. Now, instead of referring to a group, it's also being used as an ambisextrous singluar reference in place of "his or her."

My pal, Bob Armstrong (http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Fun/People/Armstrong/armstrong.html) , was even able to introduce his own word (phrase, really) into the language, and now "couch potato" is turning up in dictionaries. . .

Norman Atkinson
11-30-2005, 11:32 AM
Frank -
you mean like 'gage and plum'- old fruit?

Disgracefully

Norm- which is in the middle of three standard deviations on each side of this old mean.Or what did you mean?

3 Phase Lightbulb
11-30-2005, 12:22 PM
I think of "gage" as a tool (i.e: gas gage, tempature gage)

I think of "gauge" as a measurement unit (i.e: Fully Automatic 12 gauge Shotgun, 16 gauge shear, etc.)

-Adrian

Timleech
11-30-2005, 12:26 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:
When its green, I believe.......

</font>

Or yellow. or even spotted. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

http://www.chrisbowers.co.uk/plums.asp

Cheers
Tim

Norman Atkinson
11-30-2005, 12:40 PM
We're ver' near getting the measure of this now. Doub(s) entendre? J Tiers- you should 'watch' out for this. Jura French speaker.

Ca Va?

Norm.

J Tiers
11-30-2005, 12:56 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by NORMAN ATKINSON:
We're ver' near getting the measure of this now. Doub(s) entendre? J Tiers- you should 'watch' out for this. Jura French speaker.

Ca Va?

Norm.</font>

Nein, kein Franzosisch. Nur bisschen Deutsch, aber sehr schlect.

Otherwise just enough of 4 or 5 languages to pass for an educated person, instead of a "hoosier" (local slang for an uncouth individual).

But english is enough fun all by itself for any sensible abuser of language.

After all, "english" contains much french and latin, along with quantities of german, pieces of spanish, a dusting of various eastern languages, etc, etc. Curiously, I haven't found any portuguese, although I admit I mighn't recognize it.

As for plums, I was under the impression it was a "greengage" plum......

However I am subject to correction by one who has truly plucked the plum, investigated the duff thoroughly, and come up with the fruit of the matter.

Or is that the matter in the fruit? It may not matter to you, but any matter in a plum would matter to me.

And, as a parting shot, I certainly hope that those who insisted on "freedom fries" did not go to an eating establishment to consume them. That would have put a little "english" on the thought, adding a bit of a possibly unwanted foreign influence.....

Norman Atkinson
11-30-2005, 02:32 PM
I am delighted to concur with most of the foregoing.
The exuberance of one's own verbosity is to be encouraged at all times.

Norm

speedy
11-30-2005, 03:44 PM
I had always believed that 'gage' was the American simplification of the word 'gauge'.
What next? 'gag'?
Any more examples? Grunt away http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif
Ken