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Arbo
12-14-2005, 09:28 AM
Have you ever had one of them nights when everything seems to go wrong? Last night was one of them for me. I was working on a part in the lathe. On the final finish cut on a hub of the part, I apparently bumped the compound dial when adjusting the cross feed dial for the finish cut. The part ended up .040" undersize, because of a careless mistake. I built it back up with some weld, and started over. About ten pm last night, I finally got the part to come out the right size. Turning the weld beads was a first time thing for me, and that proved to be a challenge for my little SB 9A. During this same time, I was working on a picture frame for a friend of mine. All was going well, until the molder head on the table saw decided to take my stock and chew it up into an unrecognizable mess. So, I glued up another set of boards to replace that one. Maybe tonight, I can get some work done, instead of fixing up my screw-ups!

snowman
12-14-2005, 09:54 AM
lately i have had this problem in the shop of going out there and sitting down in front of the corn stove and just watching corn drop into the fire.

after half an hour i say the hell with it and go back upstairs to work on the computer.

AT LEAST YOU WERE WORKING!

-Jacob

Weston Bye
12-14-2005, 10:51 AM
One year for Christmas the kids got me a reloading press. The same year I was suffering from Epstein-Barr Virus. No strength, endurance or concentration. Decided I could not trust myself to repeatedly and accurately throw powder charges & etc. I put the thing away until I got better and could give my full attention.

Same way with machining; sometimes it is better to shut down and rest up. Do it once, rather than quick and twice.

Wes

3 Phase Lightbulb
12-14-2005, 12:08 PM
The key is to run through the process several times in your head first... You can still work in your shop without physically being there http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

-Adrian

torker
12-14-2005, 03:12 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by snowman:
lately i have had this problem in the shop of going out there and sitting down in front of the corn stove and just watching corn drop into the fire.

after half an hour i say the hell with it and go back upstairs to work on the computer.

AT LEAST YOU WERE WORKING!

-Jacob</font>
Jakob...that's strange...I went through the same thing awhile ago. I had so much to do that it sort of overwhelmed me I guess.
Got better after I put a dent in it all http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
Russ (and yes...arbo...I know "that night" also)

snowman
12-14-2005, 04:22 PM
tomorrow is the day.

i plan to ship out everything that has been purchased from me.

after everything is shipped, i can start enjoying the shop, at my own pace...once again. i've got a laundry list of things to do, i am looking forward to it.

-Jacob

Fasttrack
12-14-2005, 05:11 PM
"The key is to run through the process several times in your head first... You can still work in your shop without physically being there
-Adrian"

ditto! Got to have something to do while in class! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Lynn Standish
12-14-2005, 05:22 PM
I find when things are slow and boring at the day job, I have less ambition during evenings and on weekends. When things are busy at work, it seems like I feel like doing more in the home shop. Of course the two activities are very different.

darryl
12-14-2005, 08:30 PM
That's happened to me lots of times. Maybe one day I'll learn. Most often the handle on the dial will turn downwards because I didn't engage the friction ring. Usually the slide backs away and the work is left larger than expected. Sometimes my shirt or something catches the handle and I don't feel it, even though I have it in mind that it could happen. Then I take a short expletive break and go back to it. I often forget just where the dial was even if I have just set it moments ago. AAK!

Boomer
12-15-2005, 12:33 PM
My problem in a nutshell....

http://comics.com/wash/pickles/archive/pickles-20051215.html

thistle
12-15-2005, 02:19 PM
smoked the rpc just now.

does that qualify?

loose wire hidden away out sight,on capacitor bank- flash, hummmmmmmmmmm.

motor hot ,no smoke .

dont know if the thing is toast.

snowman
12-16-2005, 02:07 PM
yup

that's all i have to say today

yup

thistle
12-16-2005, 03:15 PM
of course just when itappears that i am are in a deep hole ,
then out i pop , the RPC still works and the guy at the electrical store
was kind enough to give me a couple of fuses-after 5.00- come pay tomorrow,everything working.hahahahahaha

Kdahm
12-16-2005, 03:34 PM
Must not have let the magis smoke out.

Cecil Walker
12-16-2005, 04:43 PM
Arbo, I definatley know how you feel. If i remember correctly (rarely the older I get) you also collect the old visible gas pumps as i do. I has just finished a 5 gal Frye. Completely disassembled, sandblasted, primed, painted, decaled, but with the original glass and globe. Moved the finished pump (10' high) over to the shop door (9' high) and proceeded to open the overhead door with great vigor. Then there was this terrible noise behind me, turned around, my gas pump is on the floor, broken glass everywhere. Now that's not all, I had just bought a new roll around Kennedy box and had left 3 drawers open, yep you guessed it, the pump took the open tool box drawers with it. The scene was depressing at best. I closed the door, turned out the lights and went to the house.

thistle
12-16-2005, 04:44 PM
no smoke,just the blue light.

thistle
12-16-2005, 04:49 PM
out of one pickle and into another
a few minutes ago i get the dreaded chip in the SB9 apron worked its way down,mashing a few teeth on the way,dissasembly time .
ohhhhhhh isnt time for beer?

Your Old Dog
12-17-2005, 11:30 PM
I've had, it seems, more bad days then good days in the shop lately but today wasn't one of them. Today I figured out what I was doing wrong when cutting threads on the lathe. It's been pretty depressing to know that something as seemingly simple as cutting threads was beating me. Now I can advance to other hurdles. Today was a good day. The kind of day that gets me thru the bad ones.

BillH
12-17-2005, 11:56 PM
I goofed on the boring depth of the bearing blocks for my steam locomotive. THe diameters are good, just the depths on them were not all right. Was the last machining step too on the 8 parts I did. I said "F**k it" Im going to use them, they will work. ANd one day when I have a workshop again and be reunited with my tools, I will resume that project.

wierdscience
12-18-2005, 09:50 AM
The trick of course is knowing when to quit.Sometimes the best bet is to sit down,take a nap,read a book or whatever.

My brother found this out recently while re-glazing some windows.Everything went wrong from the get go,it was a mess from start to finish,but finish he did.He was cleaning up from the days adventures when the phone rang in the house.Without thinking he turned around and stepped right in the middle of a freshly glazed 4.0' six light window he had lain on te floor for lack of space on his saw horses http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

wierdscience
12-18-2005, 09:54 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Cecil Walker:
Arbo, I definatley know how you feel. If i remember correctly (rarely the older I get) you also collect the old visible gas pumps as i do. I has just finished a 5 gal Frye. Completely disassembled, sandblasted, primed, painted, decaled, but with the original glass and globe. Moved the finished pump (10' high) over to the shop door (9' high) and proceeded to open the overhead door with great vigor. Then there was this terrible noise behind me, turned around, my gas pump is on the floor, broken glass everywhere. Now that's not all, I had just bought a new roll around Kennedy box and had left 3 drawers open, yep you guessed it, the pump took the open tool box drawers with it. The scene was depressing at best. I closed the door, turned out the lights and went to the house. </font>

You mean you didn't even cuss?I can think of quite a few adjectives and nouns I would have used.

IOWOLF
12-18-2005, 09:58 AM
WOW, this is amazing other guys make mistakes also,And I thought I was the only one.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

Kdahm
12-18-2005, 10:52 PM
Weel, today was my turn.

Setting up a brazilian cherry board I had just lain up for a backer for a piece of marble. Strip width is 2.5", total size 18"x20"

Set up the table saw, trimmed one end. Immediately set the fence to 18 3/8" to allow room to work and trimmed the other end.

Then slapped my forehead and said a few words. I just trimmed the the long dimension of my blank to the 18 3/8".

Recovered by taking scraps, trimming to 1" wide, and gluing to the ends and covering the end grain.

Karl

ammcoman2
12-19-2005, 10:09 AM
Last week I finished the installation of a DRO on my recently acquired knee-mill - so it is ready to go and needs a job.

Decided to make a BIG fly cutter as my first project. Took the dimensions from one I use on my Taig mill and doubled all the dimensions which gave a 3" diameter body. Conveniently found a piece of 1144 - press fitted a 3/4" diam. stub and turned to size So far so good and 1144 sure machines like a dream.

Next step was the angle cut on the head, then the slots for the tool bit (1/2") and cutaway for the fixing screws. Marvelling at the ease of machining and thinking "this mill is something else". Even went to Machinery's Handbook for Weldon shaft details.

Now for tryout. Slipped a carbide toolbit into the slot and did a test cut. Something's not right - cuts better on the trailing cut than on the leading one.

Realized that I've made a left-hand cutter!!!

So, after getting a reversing drum switch from McMaster-Carr and spending a day wiring it up, it works (most of the time was in verifying I had the wiring correct). Could have bought a fly cutter, same size, for less than the switch!

Anyway, the machining excercise was a good one.

Geoff

thistle
12-19-2005, 10:57 AM
and then some wanker flattened martha the shop cat....

I was covered in glass glue and crap a boat or two i built back ,and was having a conversation with some who was saying that i must be really organised and must measure every thing three times and cut once ect-
my reply was some thing like well you dont see a mess of tools cuz they have all worn
out , the table saws bearings have gone, all the drill bits are broken or rustyso i using hand tools,and they are all dull and covered in epoxy and i usually cut things too small and the the real secret is to cover up and fix all the mistakes,if you fix all the mistakes properly then sometimes the finshed product looks all right, from one side if you stand off at the right distance.