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Chrisnj
12-28-2005, 07:18 PM
I seem to have lost the compound slide gib for my Compact 5. I hate having to spend 11 bucks for a new one (shipping included). Is there a cheaper substitute then a bona fide replacement part? I know that sort of plastic is available (anyone have an extra piece? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif. Could I simply just face it off in my lathe, and having something comparable to an off the shelf part?

mochinist
12-28-2005, 08:03 PM
$11 bucks lol just by the damn thing.

aboard_epsilon
12-28-2005, 08:07 PM
Bet he uses tuna fish oil on his ways ... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif


all the best.mark

Mcgyver
12-28-2005, 08:32 PM
$11! the outrage! the cheapest way to make a new one is to find an old railway spike down at the tracks and abrade it against a big 'ole rock until its the right shape. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Mac1
12-29-2005, 10:19 AM
If the compound is cast iron, use steel or brass. Some hobbyshops stock brass strips. Get some that is about the same thickness as the old gib. Drill dimples in it where the adjusting screws touch. It will work ok.

nheng
12-29-2005, 10:43 AM
The Emco is a nice little machine and deserves the $11 (and more) for original parts.

This is one of the problems with buying used machinery from HSMs ... there is a lot of temptation to substitute materials on hand.

JCHannum
12-29-2005, 12:11 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by nheng:

This is one of the problems with buying used machinery from HSMs ... there is a lot of temptation to substitute materials on hand.</font>

Interesting response. It would seem that a HSM, not being bound by constraints of time and budget would be able to use the best materials for the job, not those that are most economical or lend themselves to the fastest production methods as is most often the case with mass produced machinery.


I always wonder why a HSM asks about parts sources when he has a machine shop at hand to make parts with. For the most part, the average machinist is more than capable of manufacturing his own replacement parts that should be equal to or better than the factory made originals.

mochinist
12-29-2005, 01:24 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JCHannum:
Interesting response. It would seem that a HSM, not being bound by constraints of time and budget would be able to use the best materials for the job</font>Yes but how many times have you seen a member of this board say he wanted to use his mystery metal/plastic because it was free or really cheap.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JCHannum:
I always wonder why a HSM asks about parts sources when he has a machine shop at hand to make parts with. For the most part, the average machinist is more than capable of manufacturing his own replacement parts that should be equal to or better than the factory made originals. </font>
If this part takes no less than 30 minutes to make then go for it, otherwise you are selling your own time short. I understand when a part is hard to get or no longer available. I also understand if it is really expensive, then I might be willing to sell my time short. It is just my opinion though, personally I find gib making pretty boring.

sauer38h
12-29-2005, 03:12 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by nheng:
there is a lot of temptation to substitute materials on hand.</font>

Hah! Not just "on hand", but already clamped in the vise.

Chrisnj
12-29-2005, 03:33 PM
as was pointed out losers, there's no sense in spending money (and waiting for it to be mailed) if it can be made easily. And if a few of you LOSERS would get off the computer and use your damned machinery, it might not seem such an arduous task. I'm frequently amazed at the responses on these boards. How people, with, and I'm giving the benefit of the doubt in an awful big way, much better things to do with their time, take the time to spout such useless drivel, it's beyond me. Now I'll respond individually:

mochinist - you have 2 spelling mistakes in the same sentence. Are you a redneck? And I happen to find you pretty boring.

aboard epsilon - I bet you use tuna oil on yer wife's...o never mind.

McGyver - that is just the most dopey arse reply I've EVER seen.

nheng - what the hell is that username supposed to signify? Never mind, I don't really care.

Thanks to JCHannum and MAC1 for providing intelligent and useful responses.

JCHannum
12-29-2005, 03:51 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">:
Yes but how many times have you seen a member of this board say he wanted to use his mystery metal/plastic because it was free or really cheap.

[/b]</font>
If this part takes no less than 30 minutes to make then go for it, otherwise you are selling your own time short. I understand when a part is hard to get or no longer available. I also understand if it is really expensive, then I might be willing to sell my time short. It is just my opinion though, personally I find gib making pretty boring.[/B][/QUOTE]


Neither argument is particularly valid. In the first place, the original question was asking advice on the appropriate material. This question is frequently asked here, and is one of the reasons people use this forum.

The second argument deals with the time involved. You would be hard pressed to find a source, part number and order the gib in less than a half hour, and then you would have to deal with your machine being down for a week or so until the part arrived, if it was not backordered for a month or more.

Using your ability and equipment to make repairs is just good sense. Having the resources of this and other forums for good advice is a bonus.

It is disappointing to hear so many negative responses to someone trying to accomplish what we are supposedly all so interested in.




[This message has been edited by JCHannum (edited 12-29-2005).]

Rex
12-29-2005, 04:03 PM
Kinda surprised that Emco would use a plastic gib. Maybe they have good reason for it, but I'd want to make a replacement of steel or brass. If theplastic is good for it's friction properties, I might want a rigid steel backup strip for it.
It's the nature of HSMing that time is cheap, and budget constraints, real or habitual, are part of the deal. In industry, a few days of downtime = $ lost. For an HSM it means you turn to one of the other projects you have unfinished, until the part arrives or you have the time, material and tools to fashion a replacement.
OTOH, I would not be surprised to see a HSM guy buy a $500 mill to make that $11 part http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Norman Atkinson
12-29-2005, 05:06 PM
Chrisnj!

YOU also made mistakes in two sentences.
One was simple stupidity but the other was gibberish.

There are many people on this Forum who tend to make mistakes both in grammar and in spelling. In general, they compensate for these niggling things with their consumate expertise. How do you compensate for being unable- or unwilling, to effect a trifling repair?

Gentlemen- and you are, who is this tite arsed git?

Norm

nheng
12-29-2005, 05:08 PM
Chrisnj, JCH is correct in that there are too many responses here that don't constitute answers to your posted question.

I apologize for not even reading your post properly to begin with. I have several Emco machines and assumed that the C5 would also have a metal gib.

The $11 is what got many of us going because, after getting quotes for replacement parts generally in the hundreds or even thousands of dollars, $11 is less than the gasoline price to go looking locally (if appropriate) for a part.

I did not intend to criticize but rather, made a lame attempt at convincing people to use genuine parts to maintain the quality of a good machine. As someone who has substituted a machined, 6061 alloy door stop for a $3.00 from Home Depot, I'm not in much of a position to preach here http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

JCH, My point on HSM machine repairs was that I do not want to open up a headstock and find a damaged gear tooth soft soldered, worn ways sanded to look good, a worn quill built up with 5 minute epoxy and the list could go on. I completely agree that SOME HSMs can produce SOME parts better than the original. On the typical used machine, I'd be a little concerned UNLESS I knew the owner or of his talents and capabilities.

Den

BillH
12-29-2005, 05:13 PM
Chrisnj, what you do is take some wax, coat the walls that would be in direct contact with the gib, then pour in 5 minute epoxy, make a new gib out of Epoxy. To keep the Epoxy from sticking in the future, after it is dried, take some acid and liberally coat the epoxy gib with it.
Now of course if you werent such a flaming Jackass, you could receive responses where you could feel atleast moderately safe that some one wasnt trying to ruin your day.

[This message has been edited by BillH (edited 12-29-2005).]

nheng
12-29-2005, 05:19 PM
BillH, Maybe so, but would the responses here really entice you to come back again for more help?

Evan
12-29-2005, 05:28 PM
JC,

I suggest you re-read the original post.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">
I hate having to spend 11 bucks for a new one (shipping included). Is there a cheaper substitute then (sic) a bona fide replacement part?
</font>

This is what got everyone going. There is no mention of time delays, simply the direct implication that a measly $11.00 (shipping included) was too much to spend to effect a proper repair.

I took it for a joke since anyone that cannot afford to spend $11 to repair thier machinery is in the wrong hobby.

I think the replies, while flippant, were for the most part deserved. I also think that Chrisnj (what sort of user name is that?) is off to a poor start here and should apologize.

aboard_epsilon
12-29-2005, 05:28 PM
Lol,I thought you were trying to wind us all up.
Wife couldn't live with me... buggered off 18 years ago,must have been something to do with making her open her own cans http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
I practise my hobby as cheaply as possible.......but try to do it the best way I can.
Plastic just wont do for gibs ........look around you, there are materials everywhere.
take a trip down to your local scrap metal merchant........plenty of good usable stuff going cheap down there I'm sure.
but at $11 there's just one choice.
Welcome to the board Chris.
all the best..mark

mochinist
12-29-2005, 05:39 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:
as was pointed out losers, there's no sense in spending money (and waiting for it to be mailed) if it can be made easily. And if a few of you LOSERS would get off the computer and use your damned machinery, it might not seem such an arduous task. I'm frequently amazed at the responses on these boards. How people, with, and I'm giving the benefit of the doubt in an awful big way, much better things to do with their time, take the time to spout such useless drivel, it's beyond me. Now I'll respond individually:

mochinist - you have 2 spelling mistakes in the same sentence. Are you a redneck? And I happen to find you pretty boring.</font>Ah ha ha no I am not a redneck, but there are a few of them on this board, pretty smart guy's too.

Sorry about the spelling mistakes, I am from AZ though and we were recently ranked last in education by some survey http://www.morganquitno.com/edrank.htm.

As for the loser comment, you can kiss my white hairy ass. I work on real machines 40 to 50 hours a week, I don't play on compact 5's. I happen to be on one of my four week's I get for vacation every year and I responded to your post with my opinion, don't worry I won't do it again.

JCHannum
12-29-2005, 05:43 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
JC,

I suggest you re-read the original post.

This is what got everyone going. There is no mention of time delays, simply the direct implication that a measly $11.00 (shipping included) was too much to spend to effect a proper repair.

I took it for a joke since anyone that cannot afford to spend $11 to repair thier machinery is in the wrong hobby.

I think the replies, while flippant, were for the most part deserved. I also think that Chrisnj (what sort of user name is that?) is off to a poor start here and should apologize.</font>

I did read the original post, and understand it. It is very simple to understand, not wanting to spend $11.00 on a $0.05 worth of plastic part when it is cheaper and faster to make a better one.

This is not an inexpensive hobby, and if money can be saved using the materials and tools at hand, what is the purpose of having them.

As far as using inappropriate materials or cutting corners to save a buck, I recall someone using MDF for a faceplate a while back, but I guess that is OK, or perhaps he should be looking for another hobby.

As far as his name, It is Chris, and he is from Tom's River, N.J. whatever that has to do with anything.

Evan
12-29-2005, 05:50 PM
"As far as his name, It is Chris, and he is from Tom's River, N.J. whatever that has to do with anything."

Read all the posts. I presume you gained that information from his profile. If you study nheng's profile you may deduce that it probably stands for New Hampshire Engineer.

Chrisnj
12-29-2005, 05:50 PM
"...but I'd want to make a replacement of steel or brass..."

The compound is made out of steel or iron. The dovetail is diecast. I had thought of replacing all the gibs and whatnot with brass or steel, but the diecast parts would wear that much faster. Yes, plastic is in wide use these days on many of the *quality* imports. And I was told that the lathe produces quality work as is, so I suppose there's no reason to replace the parts with anything but what the manufacturer originally called for. Show me wrong if I'm wrong.

"Chrisnj!
YOU also made mistakes in two sentences.
One was simple stupidity but the other was gibberish."

From the sound of it, you have the market cornered on stupidity. That must be the first time I've seen someone omit the U in BUY. It's only 3 letters...

"There are many people on this Forum who tend to make mistakes both in grammar and in spelling."

Right, and you lead the pack.

"There are many people on this Forum who tend to make mistakes both in grammar and in spelling. In general, they compensate for these niggling things with their consumate expertise. How do you compensate for being unable- or unwilling, to effect a trifling repair?"

I never said I was an expert or anything close. This is the sort of snobbery that I find so odious. Why do you bother contributing to a public message board? Heaven forbid someone without the necessary know how comes along with a question, they are pelted with inane, senseless, ignorant remarks of the sort you're so capable of. Go somewhere else and hang out with your blessed experts.

"The $11 is what got many of us going because, after getting quotes for replacement parts generally in the hundreds or even thousands of dollars, $11 is less than the gasoline price to go looking locally (if appropriate) for a part."

I repectfully disagree. I read "the Metal Lathe" by Dave Gingery sometime ago. I find that's one of the best ways to learn about machining in general - read about making one. It would be nice to actually try it. Or at least some part of it. Evan as simple as a gib.

"I did not intend to criticize but rather, made a lame attempt at convincing people to use genuine parts to maintain the quality of a good machine. As someone who has substituted a machined, 6061 alloy door stop for a $3.00 from Home Depot, I'm not in much of a position to preach here"

There's a point there. But someone did point out, and it's not outlandish to suggest a better part, or at least something close, could be made on the machine itself.

"Now of course if you werent such a flaming Jackass, you could receive responses where you could feel atleast moderately safe that some one wasnt trying to ruin your day.
"

Yet more stupidity. Thankfully, I don't think I'll have to rely on you for help. There are others on the forum w/o colossal jagged sticks up their butt. And I can't help but wonder if someone had pulled that awfully slick trick on you at some point http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif.

BillH
12-29-2005, 06:13 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:

Yet more stupidity. Thankfully, I don't think I'll have to rely on you for help. There are others on the forum w/o colossal jagged sticks up their butt. And I can't help but wonder if someone had pulled that awfully slick trick on you at some point http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif.</font>

I'd say some one pulled an oftly slick trick on you, have a 1300$ 5" lathe that uses plastic gibs. Since you live in the North East, you could of gotten a nice used southbend for much less.

Evan
12-29-2005, 06:32 PM
"I recall someone using MDF for a faceplate a while back,"

Odd you should think that an inappropriate use of material. It worked perfectly as the results attest.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/spider2.jpg

mochinist
12-29-2005, 06:43 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:
From the sound of it, you have the market cornered on stupidity. That must be the first time I've seen someone omit the U in BUY. It's only 3 letters...</font>
LMAO sorry I meant to spell BI or is it BYE, or maybe I didn't fully hit the U key which is right next to the Y key. I tri and spel ol my werds write butt sumtymes I em wrong http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gifAnyways enjoy your night

Chrisnj
12-29-2005, 07:15 PM
"I'd say some one pulled an oftly slick trick on you, have a 1300$ 5" lathe that uses plastic gibs. Since you live in the North East, you could of gotten a nice used southbend for much less."

And what else does $1300 get you these days??? New Southbends are about $14,000 the last time I heard. Used SB's start at $500 I'd say. And a Southbend isn't a replacement for a C5 (and vice versa). If you need to pick up a lathe and move it around, a SB is NOT the way to go. The size of the parts you're working on also needs to be taken into consideration.
Emco lathes, perhaps excluding the Unimat 3, are renowned for their quality. Many of the imports are using plastic and whatnot these days, but for certain purposes it might not be all that bad a thing. How much does a new plastic gear cost? What about a replacement gear for a SB?
And I only payed $200 for my C5. Well equipped. Missing a few things here and there. As you all know. Sheesh.

"LMAO sorry I meant to spell BI or is it BYE, or maybe I didn't fully hit the U key which is right next to the Y key. I tri and spel ol my werds write butt sumtymes I em wrong Anyways enjoy your night"

All is forgiven my son http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif. Want me to send you a razor by some chance?

gizmo2
12-29-2005, 07:25 PM
Now who'da thunk the seemingly innocous topic heading of "Plastic Gibs" would be the repository of such scintilating discourse? This was like one of those DVD's with BONUS material that is longer than the movie itself. Thanks boys, I always learn something, just never sure what it's gonna be...

JCHannum
12-29-2005, 07:28 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Evan:

Odd you should think that an inappropriate use of material. It worked perfectly as the results attest.

My point exactly, it all depends on your point of view, I am sure that Chris can make a perfectly acceptable gib.

You are currently involved in making a milling machine mainly out of aluminum. To many people that could seem that you are too cheap to buy one or make one out of the "proper" materials. We know this is not the case, you are doing it for the challenge and satisfaction, not the financial aspects. There is only a difference of magnitude of project in what Chris wants information on doing.

We all started somewhere with a certain level of skill and knowledge. The only way we add to it is by doing and asking. If we only get smart a$$ replies, or are told to go buy it, we will never develop.

As far as a machine being repaired by a HSM, I would rather have one that had been owned and cared for by a person who knew the machine inside and out and properly maintained it and repaired it when needed than something out of the average commercial shop that has been abused and ignored to get the production out. Many so-called machinists are nothing more than glorified button pushers, and will run the machine until it grinds itself to pieces. Think cab-driver versus car nut.

mochinist
12-29-2005, 07:29 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:
All is forgiven my son http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif. Want me to send you a razor by some chance?</font>Can you afford a new one, or do you need to ask one of us how to make one?



[This message has been edited by mochinist (edited 12-30-2005).]

phil burman
12-29-2005, 07:36 PM
Wow somebody really shoved that stick along way up.

Phil


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:
"...but I'd want to make a replacement of steel or brass..."

The compound is made out of steel or iron. The dovetail is diecast. I had thought of replacing all the gibs and whatnot with brass or steel, but the diecast parts would wear that much faster. Yes, plastic is in wide use these days on many of the *quality* imports. And I was told that the lathe produces quality work as is, so I suppose there's no reason to replace the parts with anything but what the manufacturer originally called for. Show me wrong if I'm wrong.

"Chrisnj!
YOU also made mistakes in two sentences.
One was simple stupidity but the other was gibberish."

From the sound of it, you have the market cornered on stupidity. That must be the first time I've seen someone omit the U in BUY. It's only 3 letters...

"There are many people on this Forum who tend to make mistakes both in grammar and in spelling."

Right, and you lead the pack.

"There are many people on this Forum who tend to make mistakes both in grammar and in spelling. In general, they compensate for these niggling things with their consumate expertise. How do you compensate for being unable- or unwilling, to effect a trifling repair?"

I never said I was an expert or anything close. This is the sort of snobbery that I find so odious. Why do you bother contributing to a public message board? Heaven forbid someone without the necessary know how comes along with a question, they are pelted with inane, senseless, ignorant remarks of the sort you're so capable of. Go somewhere else and hang out with your blessed experts.

"The $11 is what got many of us going because, after getting quotes for replacement parts generally in the hundreds or even thousands of dollars, $11 is less than the gasoline price to go looking locally (if appropriate) for a part."

I repectfully disagree. I read "the Metal Lathe" by Dave Gingery sometime ago. I find that's one of the best ways to learn about machining in general - read about making one. It would be nice to actually try it. Or at least some part of it. Evan as simple as a gib.

"I did not intend to criticize but rather, made a lame attempt at convincing people to use genuine parts to maintain the quality of a good machine. As someone who has substituted a machined, 6061 alloy door stop for a $3.00 from Home Depot, I'm not in much of a position to preach here"

There's a point there. But someone did point out, and it's not outlandish to suggest a better part, or at least something close, could be made on the machine itself.

"Now of course if you werent such a flaming Jackass, you could receive responses where you could feel atleast moderately safe that some one wasnt trying to ruin your day.
"

Yet more stupidity. Thankfully, I don't think I'll have to rely on you for help. There are others on the forum w/o colossal jagged sticks up their butt. And I can't help but wonder if someone had pulled that awfully slick trick on you at some point http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif.</font>

lynnl
12-29-2005, 08:49 PM
C'mon now folks, Tis the season to be jolly!

Evan
12-29-2005, 11:33 PM
"To many people that could seem that you are too cheap to buy one or make one out of the "proper" materials."

Heh. Have you priced aluminum lately? It has cost more than buying one to date, although not more than buying what would be a comparable CNC machine. As for the aluminum, I like aluminum but more important, I could not make it from steel or cast iron because of the limitations of my equipment.

Millman
12-30-2005, 12:51 AM
JC, Couldn't have said it better myself, especially about the" button pushers"!

------------------
Dave da Slave

Norman Atkinson
12-30-2005, 02:24 AM
What gives with the guy?
He doesn't know what he is doing yet when he gets an answer is so bloody disparaging to those who were kind enough to help.

Wasn't it in Corinthians that the expression
"Be ye circumspect" quoted?
Indeed, Chris(tian)from New Jersey, you have more than Dave Gingery to read!

Again, thank you, gentlemen, for humouring him.

Norman

Millman
12-30-2005, 02:34 AM
Yeah, but he DID ask if anyone had a PIECE!?

------------------
Dave da Slave

hoffman
12-30-2005, 02:40 AM
Welcome aboard Chris! I see you work as a nunya.

I worked as a nunya at the Broad Creek Plant in '92 but the colossal jagged sticks up my butt caused some health problems...

------------------
Deep Sea Tool Salvage

Buckshot
12-30-2005, 05:51 AM
........Hello Chrisnj. Welcome to the board http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif I've only been at this machining stuff about 2 years come Febuary. I graduated from a 3/8 VSR drill motor clamped in a bench vise to a pretty nice 11x36 Logan/Powermatic that was really well tooled up. Am I in heaven or what?

I don't know anything about plastic gibs. I wasn't even aware they used them. They do some pretty fantastic stuff with plastics these days. I'd been high bidder on a dual toolpost cross slide and it didn't have a gib. I asked here about buying gibs as I couldn't find them listed anywhere.

I was told to make one, and was told to use steel, brass, and cast iron. I figured steel as the regular cross slide and compound both appeared to be steel, but I just had to check because who knows, eh? Especially a new guy like me who was kind of afraid of his new lathe anyway :-)

So anyway I bought some ground steel stock that would fit and made it look as much like the existing cross slide gib as possible and have been using that ever since. Wish I knew the answer to your question.

I think if you go back and look at the early responces you got to your question, I think you'll find they were made in jest and were poking fun. There was a 'lol' and smiley faces inserted. I didn't see any meanness. Since you cannot see body language or hear inflection in a spoken voice, these have to substitute. It was in fun.

Part of it may have been the $11 for a gib. Consider that the white lead dauber in the tailstock of my Logan costs $27? All it does for me is plug up a hole http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif . That $11 probably wouldn't buy 4 drive rivits to attach a "Fwd-Rev" lable on some machines. Not that anyone would just throw away eleven bucks for no good reason, it's just a kind of a persepctive thing.

Rick



[This message has been edited by Buckshot (edited 12-30-2005).]

topct
12-30-2005, 07:48 AM
"I know that sort of plastic is available (anyone have an extra piece?"

Unless I missed it I think he might be refering to Tercite? It would make a real nice "plastic" gib if it where backed by a piece of steel.

I was also wondering about the $11 price for a machine part and the reluctance to spend the money on it. It could have avoided all this discussion.

I think his question would have been better answered if it was just asked simply, "What kind of plastic would I use to make a gib for a lathe, and where can I get some?"

But then I know for sure some would ask "why?" and then the $11 dollar thing would come up and........there we go.



------------------
Gene

J Tiers
12-30-2005, 09:10 AM
Well, I AM a redneck.... farmer tan, red neck, t-shirt with open flannel shirt, ball cap, fat gut and all.... plus the attitude. So? I clean up OK.... but type horribly, so criticize at will (not at me).

In any case, if you are not in business, and enjoy machine repair, why the dickens SHOULDN'T you make the part?

I get as much shop time and enjoyment out of making a repair part as making a part for some small engine etc. More, maybe, since it usually requires me to do something I don't know how to do yet. It's like an apprentice project everytime.

I recently made a bevel gear assembly. I could have bought it for $117 (NOT!), or I could have bought a Boston Gear replacement bevel gear, and attached it to a sleeve, probably for 1/3 the price. I made it because I wanted to, had the time, and needed the gear. More useful than a 4 cylinder engine 2" long, even if less artistic.

As far as the gib.... If the dovetail way is die cast on teh compact5, out of what is it made?

The whole deal with gibs is for them to be made of some material which won't wear badly, won't wear the ways, won't be so flexible as to allow movement, and won't tend to embed abrasives and function as a lap.

I have used CRS, brass, and CI as gibs. All were working against CI, though.

Working against the die casting metal, which may be something akin to zamak, you might be best off to use the plastic, and spend the money. A gib significantly harder than the ways might, if not polished, wear them out due to abrasion from the minute surface irregularities acting as a file.

In your specific case, the $11 may be best. It isn't unreasonable price-wise to get you going and preserve the machine. And plastic seems to be the OEM material for a reason.

Evan
12-30-2005, 10:12 AM
My red neck is a bit faded this time of year but I do spend a bit too much time with my keyboard...

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/trog1.jpg

Mac1
12-30-2005, 11:08 AM
A few years back I bought a brand new compound for an old 10 inch Atlas. The compound was made of cast iron and it came with a plastic gib. I swapped it out for the original steel gib. Worked ok.

Chrisnj
12-30-2005, 03:41 PM
being a redneck, IMHO, has nothing to do with where you come from, or how you talk, or dress, etc. I really shouldn't have used the term. The RUDE, NASTY, STUPID, IGNORANT people I meet around where I live are what I call REDNECKS. My usage. I meant no offence to anyone in particular. And If you're into MACHINERY, I'd be happy to call you a friend. And I'm here apologizing if anyone was offended. In reality though non was meant.
Anyway, haven't we worn this thread out? If the dopey bast**** would have just stayed out of it, and allowed the people with useful responses to respond, I think we could have avoided all this. There actually have been several remarkably insightful replies. Not too many on the board work with the smaller machines it seems though - I still don't have the answer I was looking for. AND I AIN'T PAYING THE 11 BUCKS!! In reality I might break down and order it, but really don't want to. If you can make it (in a reasonable amount of time) why buy it? I don't imagine there are many reading this who's finances are strained from the recent holiday. There's this place called AIN Plastics up in north Jersey somewhere. They're likely to have the material. Or one of the more common places (MSC, Nolan Supply...).

JCHannum
12-30-2005, 03:56 PM
Chris, someone mentioned Turcite, which is used as a liner when rebuilding machines, it is an ethylene co polymer, also known as Halar; http://www.aetnaplastics.com/ws-turcite.htm

Another material to try could be some of the acetals. They are rigid, low friction materials.


Brass is may not be a bad choice either, it is a low speed application, and would probably not cause undue wear. Is the actual sliding contact the gib to diecast, or gib to cast iron. The gib is normally fixed to the moving part, and slides against the fixed part.

If the movement is on the cast iron, steel or brass will be fine.

Millman
12-30-2005, 04:14 PM
Chris, check your email when you get a chance.

Your Old Dog
12-30-2005, 04:54 PM
Welcome to the Forum.

Score:
Chrisnjs 2 - Lions 8


JUST KIDDING http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

ricksplace
12-30-2005, 08:11 PM
Interesting thread.

Welcome to the bbs.

When I first got my lathe, I used to make sizer dies for my lyman lubri-sizer. It was fun at the time, and I learned a lot making them. Now I just buy 'em, unless it's a size I can't get.

operose
12-30-2005, 08:58 PM
uhm... holy ****!

BillH
12-30-2005, 09:26 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">
I meant no offence to anyone in particular. And If you're into MACHINERY, I'd be happy to call you a friend. And I'm here apologizing if anyone was offended. In reality though non was meant.
Anyway, haven't we worn this thread out? If the dopey bast**** would have just stayed out of it, and allowed the people with useful responses to respond, I think we could have avoided all this. There actually have been several remarkably insightful replies. Not too many on the board work with the smaller machines it seems though - I still don't have the answer I was looking for. </font>

First you appoligize, say you meant to not offend anyone, THEN you call those who didnt give you the answer you wanted Dopey Bastards.
Well I do work with the smaller machines, and I do have your answer, but sir, your a jackass and not worthy of my help. I noticed in your bio that your into trains and I assume into Live steam or the smaller scales, gee, mee too. One day sir, you will learn to not burn bridges, and if you don't, that is your loss.
Your a new guy to this forum and the first thing you do is insult people. Gee, we must exist to answer questions only in your version of reality.
And quite frankly I am shocked from some of the people in this forum who took the **** you dished to them. I will have none of it.

[This message has been edited by BillH (edited 12-30-2005).]

Evan
12-30-2005, 10:44 PM
Hoffman pointed this out but I'm pretty sure that most people on this BBS don't know what it means.

From the profile for Chrisnj:



Date Registered: 02-15-2005
Status: Member
Total Posts: 8
Current Email: **************
Homepage: http://
Occupation: nunya
Location: Toms River, NJ, USA
Interests: metalworking, trains, old computers


"nunya"

Definition: Net slang often used in chat rooms and text messaging. Means "None of your business", usually with a more pejoritave connotation such as "None of your ****ing business".

This seems to me an indication of the attitude that Chris has displayed so far. He has been registered for quite a while so he isn't unaware of what goes on here. It isn't completely unexpected since we computer geeks tend to have the social skills of my Karelian Beardog, which is to say none.

J Tiers
12-30-2005, 11:02 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chrisnj:
being a redneck, IMHO, has nothing to do with where you come from, or how you talk, or dress, etc. I really shouldn't have used the term. The RUDE, NASTY, STUPID, IGNORANT people I meet around where I live are what I call REDNECKS. My usage. </font>

Oh.

Them's what us'ns call "hoosiers" here in the Lou. Folks who "act ign'rnt".
.
.

In any case, this plastic.... what kinda sorta plastic we talkin about here?

Something like a canvas reinforced phenolic plastic (like some ball bearing cages)? That would be a sort of tan or brown stuff in the side of which you might see a weave.

Or something else?

If its the canvas reinforced phenolic, it is similar to some PB board materials (but NOT the glass fiber type). Somewhat special, and might be worth the money.

I'd be a bit afraid of wearing the casting, as mentioned. You might want to use the original stuff because it was no doubt picked for a reason.

A secondary material choice might be brass. I think it would embed grit more, and wear the casting material more, but you do seem determined........

Norman Atkinson
12-31-2005, 02:09 AM
This is almost the New Year.
I hope that one resolution will be to ban future outbursts from Chrisnj.

Like BillH, I know the answer. In fact, I have just made a set of replacement gibs for one of my lathes, an ageing Myford ML7.

Like many of us, we may be experienced in quite a number of parts of machining but there are gaps especially when little is documented. Being short of information, I wrote-politely- and got exactly the answers which were sought. Again, I had the maturity to extend my thanks to those who had taken the time to reply. Again, my thanks!

In an earlier part of this posting, I attempted to correct your English. Quite frankly, I would be loathe to be contaminated with what is singular ignorance. Again, I set off to caution your
attitude in the hope of some amelioration in your tone.After all, this is being read all over the English speaking world. This is not, I repeat not, an opening for you- and your ill manners.

To the rest of you most enjoyable company, my best wishes to you and yours in the coming year and I look forward to further enjoyable fellowship.

Norman Atkinson

malbenbut
12-31-2005, 05:02 AM
Well said Noman

ricksplace
12-31-2005, 09:06 AM
You do have a way with words, Norman.

hoffman
12-31-2005, 09:16 AM
WTF is "amelioration"?

I'm gonna email Neil and tell him you're using big words again.

You know all us rednecks can't understand that fancy talk http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Actually, for once I can actually tell what Norman is saying http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

JCHannum
12-31-2005, 09:53 AM
A person comes on the forum with a legitimate question, and the first posts accuse him of being cheap, dumb and incompetant, further on he is dissected even as to his username. Is it any wonder he shows an attitude?

The constant and tiresome bickering and flaming a couple of members indulge in could lead a newcomer to believe that is the norm here. It is not, and I for one would be more than happy to see either it or them go away. Funny, no one seems to object to them or bring them to task.

Now, the postings have degenerated to the third grade level, "Nya nya nya, I know the answer and I'm not telling."

If this is the mark of an expert, I am glad I don't pretend to be one.

Evan
12-31-2005, 09:56 AM
"further on he is dissected even as to his username"

JC, Chris started that particular bit.

I refer you to this in his previous post:


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">
nheng - what the hell is that username supposed to signify? Never mind, I don't really care.

</font>

JCHannum
12-31-2005, 10:03 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
[B
JC, Chris started that particular bit.

</font>[/B][/QUOTE]

"He started it Mama", that fits right in there in the grade school maturity level.

Evan
12-31-2005, 10:25 AM
My response to that original comment was meant as sarcastic but apparently you aren't paying attention.

Norman Atkinson
12-31-2005, 11:32 AM
I deeply regret being obliged to make criticism! It was a time when words were carefully put together. They were chosen with the future of this more than happy bunch of characters in mind. Of course, we have our differences, agreements and a certain amount of harmless horseplay which adds spice and merriment to the whole.

What has come through to me has been how good natured and tolerant everone is to each other. In posts, there has been genuine concern for people that we know very well but who we will probably never see. My mail box is full of welcome chit chat about this and that. Isn't it nice to have TWO families?

That feeling of togetherness was severely prejudiced. Each of us may well have different views. Each of us is equally entitled to them.

The foregoing is an expression of democracy and I simply recorded my ONE vote.

May tomorrow revive the good feeling amongst us.

Norman

[This message has been edited by NORMAN ATKINSON (edited 12-31-2005).]

[This message has been edited by NORMAN ATKINSON (edited 12-31-2005).]

Chrisnj
12-31-2005, 12:09 PM
uh boy. I REALLY think some of us need to move on. JC - of course this is a totally prejudiced statement, but you're totally alright in my book http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif. It could be said that I overeact to some things possibly, maybe it's just the way people tend to react *on the net* to simple questions, particularly from a newbie (I've logged on to this site 3 or 4 times since registering). I just find it in particular rather distasteful, and yes I was effectively called cheap amongst other things. I don't have to listen to insults from anyone. It's like some people have nothing better to do but sound off, since they have nothing useful to contribute.
To the person who asked, the gib would slide against the diecast part, so I think I'll stick with plastic for now anyway. Happy New Year you bunch of rednecks LOL LOL. Just kidding.