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Dawai
01-01-2006, 08:22 PM
I have ewheel all over my shop.. about 6 months ago I started some mods..

My wheel vibrates and chatters.. I thought it was my quick, tool mount.. now, Looking at other peoples, I think the two sockets are too far apart to ever line up perfectly..
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/englishwheel.jpg
right now? I got ideas to move the bottom socket up, add the air lift right to the lower arm. My cantilever setup folded up under the 1200lbs pressure.. I saw enough to beleive it can exert enough pressure to wheel the metal.. and with a air guage I can reset it to past known settings.. Anyone else seen a air cylinder on one?

wierdscience
01-01-2006, 08:32 PM
I have never seen an air cylinder on one,but that doesn't mean they don't exist.


Didn't someone post pics of one that had a quick release cam?

[This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 01-01-2006).]

CCWKen
01-01-2006, 08:57 PM
Message Deleted.

[This message has been edited by CCWKen (edited 01-01-2006).]

Dawai
01-01-2006, 08:59 PM
CCW huh? whats up wix you?

CCWKen
01-01-2006, 09:12 PM
The chattering may be the bearings. Use a good quality sealed bearing with at least a 5/8" or 3/4" bore. These will handle the load much better than the "standard" 1/2" bearings.

I've heard of a few that tried using hydraulic lifts or jacks on their E-wheels but they didn't work well. The hydraulics still had a little give to them. I would suspect air would be worse.

I could see using a cylinder to actuate a mechanical link. The link arm would have to be an over-center lock so the pressure is taken off the cylinder though.

I've got a lever on mine that is an over-center lock. When flush with the lower column, it locks the lift up and I can adjust the pressure with the kick wheel. To release, I lift the lever. The kick wheel stays where adjusted. So far it's worked quite well.

There's a large spring inside the column that ties the middle section (adjusting column) to the upper section (lower anvil/quick release). With a good tight system, you need the spring to pull the anvil away from the upper wheel.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/CCWKen/Tools/Ewheel/EwheelCombo-2.jpg

[This message has been edited by CCWKen (edited 01-01-2006).]

CCWKen
01-01-2006, 10:46 PM
Oh yeah, I've cut down the gib screws since the pic was taken. It doesn't look like range cactus now. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Hey, that may be where your chatter is comming from. There shouldn't be any radial play in the top wheel or anvils.

Norman Atkinson
01-02-2006, 01:08 AM
David

Somehow I recall replying before.

English Wheels or Wheeling Machines are built like brick **** houses! They are massive and incredibly heavy.

Again, the lower wheels are so heavy that they can barely be lifted. Furthermore, they are in sets and crowned to suit the curvature needed. The lower wheels are simply dropped into a slot.

What are shown here have to be regarded as toys.

Sorry Old Friend but you need a bigger drawing board!

Norm

Norman Atkinson
01-02-2006, 01:27 AM
David,
I have been Googling in an attemot to find you more details.

On the UK Google, there is a firm called Frost Auto Restoration with pictures of wheels and other car restoration swag.
Have a look and compare what you have and theirs. By old fashioned standards, Frosts stuff are toys. Expensive toys but still toys. The one I used was massive by comparison- but even it was a toy compared with those that hand made 'one off' car bodies in the past.

Norman

Dawai
01-02-2006, 08:01 AM
Yeah, Norman I agree, the lighter tool loses out when you are trying to be smoothe.

I got what I got at the moment thou. I wish I had a good cupola going so I could pour some cast iron ewheel frames. THEM are crazy priced.

BUT, working with "what I have" is what I have to do till I do better.

CCW: the 6" cylinder @ 100psi x Pi 3.14 x cantilever ratio of 3:1 = exerted pressure 5400+lbs? I had a double 2x2rect 11ga cantilever going back to the post where I had the cylinder mounted. It didn't hurt me when it gave way, but folded double flattening out the tube. I think I was 10 feet away and moving fast.

In my mind I could see it shucking the sheet at me slicing me in half.

It exerts enough pressure to operate and stretch the steel. Cantilever is history. Not again. I also got a motor and gearbox on top of the frame, it has a shaft feeding out to a go cart wheel on a eccentric. Idea was to use it to hammer a 1" die. Use the wheel to fix it.
Looking at the MM site? I kinda want a go cart wheel to oppose the e-anvil on bottom.

wierdscience
01-02-2006, 11:36 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
The chattering may be the bearings. Use a good quality sealed bearing with at least a 5/8" or 3/4" bore. These will handle the load much better than the "standard" 1/2" bearings.

I've heard of a few that tried using hydraulic lifts or jacks on their E-wheels but they didn't work well. The hydraulics still had a little give to them. I would suspect air would be worse.

I could see using a cylinder to actuate a mechanical link. The link arm would have to be an over-center lock so the pressure is taken off the cylinder though.

I've got a lever on mine that is an over-center lock. When flush with the lower column, it locks the lift up and I can adjust the pressure with the kick wheel. To release, I lift the lever. The kick wheel stays where adjusted. So far it's worked quite well.

There's a large spring inside the column that ties the middle section (adjusting column) to the upper section (lower anvil/quick release). With a good tight system, you need the spring to pull the anvil away from the upper wheel.


[This message has been edited by CCWKen (edited 01-01-2006).]</font>

Oh,so your the one with the lever! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif