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QSIMDO
01-02-2006, 02:21 PM
To what might the name refer to?
It would appear that the lever raises and lowers the cutter to fixed positions, hence the name, but I continue to be wrong with alarming regularity.
Is this a secondary operation only type of machine?
http://www.industrialsurplus.com/photos/073-142_2.jpg

Your Old Dog
01-02-2006, 02:47 PM
Thought a hand miller was a file.....

snowman
01-02-2006, 02:49 PM
dont know about the red handle.

generally a hand miller has a big handle on the x axis that moves it with mechanical advantage

yes, generally suited for secondary work only, but some people will add a screw to the axis so it can do different work

-jacob

JCHannum
01-02-2006, 03:22 PM
A hand miler is usually a small horizontal machine with lever movement on the travels. Yes, they are second operation or production machines used for a specific set up.

Some can be converted to feed screw operation.

J Tiers
01-02-2006, 03:24 PM
Thought it was any one with no power feeds, but full (typically calibrated) movements in x,y,z..

Then there is "lever feed" and "production". Production usually has fewer movements, as it is just for "clamp down and pass through cutter" operations. May be either power or lever feed, typically.

Combo, "hand production miller"

Rustybolt
01-02-2006, 05:21 PM
Yes it's a hand miller. Usually used in production, hence the levers and not screws.Yours looks in particularly good shape.Usually they're set up to run tens or hundreds of thousands of parts.
Nichols made/makes a good one.

QSIMDO
01-02-2006, 05:31 PM
Oh, that's not mine.
It's from my favorite drool & dream site.

http://www.industrialsurplus.com/mills/mills.htm

Check the list. Think Cincinnati ever made these? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//rolleyes.gif
Love to hear the story behind that collection.

IOWOLF
01-02-2006, 05:49 PM
I have a Barker mill and it is hand feed,second op machine.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

DR
01-02-2006, 07:37 PM
Nichols mills came in a bunch of different configurations.

Mine had levers on Z axis and X axis, screw on Y. Also it had a screw on X with a way to quickly convert from lever feed to screw feed.

Pretty sturdy machines with the 40 taper.

The downside is when you go to sell them....not much demand. I needed the space, advertised mine for $300. One looker, had to sweeten the deal with a B'port M-head and a Rockwell horizontal bandsaw that needed a little work. Money wise I shouold have just given it away.

m squared
01-02-2006, 09:12 PM
OH now you've done and done it. Given me yet another tool drool site. You are an evil person, I like that!

M2

L Webb
01-06-2006, 02:26 PM
I have an old Rouse Hand Miller. It looks more like a small chopsaw. It is setup with a nasty looking little saw blade and fixturing to make miter cuts.

OHSA would have a cow if they saw it setup in the shop. No guards anywhere.

Les

Rustybolt
01-06-2006, 04:38 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by L Webb:
I have an old Rouse Hand Miller. It looks more like a small chopsaw. It is setup with a nasty looking little saw blade and fixturing to make miter cuts.

OHSA would have a cow if they saw it setup in the shop. No guards anywhere.

Les</font>

Those were sold to department stoes by the thousands to trim retracting window shades. Rouse is still in business.

L Webb
01-06-2006, 05:17 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Those were sold to department stoes by the thousands to trim retracting window shades. Rouse is still in business.</font>

I never would have guessed that Rustybolt. It looks like this one was setup for mitering cuts on some kind of small material. I'll have to get it off the shelf and take a closer look at it.
Thanks

Les

charlie coghill
01-06-2006, 09:16 PM
I purchased one a couple of years ago. I cut the groves for the tool holders for the lathe tool holder.
My miller has a air operated table with oil hydralic cylinders and needle valves to controll the speed of the table. The table can also be feed with a lead screw or a rack and pinon and lever.
The lever located on the head is to position the cutting arbor or to make plunge cuts.
The following two pics are of the mill cutting the tool blocks.
For a home shop I think it is great, it gives you the avantage of the horzional mill with out the large floor print.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/2005_1114Image0007.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/2005_1114Image0008.jpg

charlie coghill
01-06-2006, 09:19 PM
Sorry about the large pic. I for got to resize.

QSIMDO
01-06-2006, 09:45 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by charlie coghill:
[B]For a home shop I think it is great, it gives you the avantage of the horzional mill with out the large floor print.
</font>

For the uneducated please; exactly what is "the advantage of a horizontal mill"?

They seem to be an anachronism as most all tool catalogs I've seen emphasize vertical machines.

Rustybolt
01-06-2006, 10:03 PM
If you look a the picture above, they are great at hogging out a lot of material to make a groove, or square up a peice.Something that would take awhile in w turret mill. You can put cutters in tandem and mill two grooves at one time, or even more. And right now the cutters aren't that expensive.

charlie coghill
01-07-2006, 06:27 PM
and to add to what Rusty said you can endmill with them but not as convient as with a vertical mill.
Except for the under cut for the dove tail, below is a set of tool blocks that was milled out on the Nichols and two pic of the mill one with a 2" traval dial ind. mounted.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/2006_0106Image0020.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/2006_0106Image0018.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/2006_0106Image0014.jpg

[This message has been edited by charlie coghill (edited 01-07-2006).]

[This message has been edited by charlie coghill (edited 01-07-2006).]