PDA

View Full Version : New to forum - questions



LongLonesomeHwy
01-31-2006, 10:37 AM
Just joined this site after checking it out for a few weeks and seeing that there is quite a bit of knowledge and experience to be found here.

I've been retired for a few years after a career which included 18 years in an engineering machine shop. I've missed having the ability to build and repair things in metal and recently acquired a South Bend 9" lathe at an estate auction.

While getting it set up and sorted out, I realized that to do what I would like to do (more on that later)I would also need the ability to do some basic milling and boring. I live less that 2 hours from Grizzly's Springfield, Mo. store and I began considering one of their mill-drills, as I can't afford, or justify, a Bridgeport-type mill. Grizzly has a "scratch-n-dent" room at the store, and I was able to pick up a G1005Z for $750 with just a few scratches on the belt guard. This is a 1-hp machine with 7-1/2"x23" table and R-8 spindle. It seems to be a fairly nice machine for what it is, of course I do have some issues. I swung an indicator in the spindle across the table in about a 10" circle and the head is off by about .010" in that distance. Also, speed changes are a pain and there's no power table or downfeed - but hey, I'm retired - I've got time!!

Anyway - don't mean to write a book here - I'm sure to have more questions later.

Eventually I think I would like to build a small marine gas engine. I've seen some kits and/or plans on the internet, but they are models, such as a 1/5 scale 1912 Hubbard single cylinder - only about 1" bore and stroke. I'd like to build something that has about 5hp, probably a reproduction of an early marine engine design.

Does anyone know where I might find kits/plans/information on this type of project?

Thanks,

Greg

TECHSHOP
01-31-2006, 02:13 PM
LongLonesomeHwy

Welcome, always nice to have a new voice.

Not a fan of mill/drills. But I would check where the column and base meet, and get metal to metal contact, often there is paint, and other junk in the space between.

And there is a recent thread with a bunch of engines, with a least one picture of a marine engine with shaft and prop.

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

SGW
01-31-2006, 02:36 PM
These may not be as large as you're looking for, but Jerry Howell www.jerry-howell.com/ (http://www.jerry-howell.com/) sells some nice engine plans for pretty reasnable cost. Scale one up 2X, maybe????



[This message has been edited by SGW (edited 01-31-2006).]

Tinkerer
01-31-2006, 02:55 PM
Hi Greg... Welcome. You may want to check and see if the base bolts are equally torque down. Your deals been up and down the road at least a couple times bolts could of loosened. In the end shimming the base will bring the table in line. Place a dial in and loose bolts and make U shaped shims to bring your column into square with the table. Don't mind the folks who pooh pooh your mill drill plenty of fine work has been made on these tools. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

LongLonesomeHwy
02-02-2006, 08:28 AM
Thanks to the few who replied to my first post here.

Tinkerer - Thanks for the suggestion on squaring up the mill/drill as well as the positive comments. With proper setup and an understanding of the machines capabilities and limitations, I'm sure I can get some satisfactory results with it.

Greg

bikenut
02-03-2006, 12:41 AM
Welcome Aboard!

WJHartson
02-03-2006, 01:57 AM
Welcome, I started with a mill-drill and was able to do a lot of good work on it. With any of the Asian machines there is some debugging that has to take place. Since you are retired and have the time to work on the mill drill you will have it working in no time.

Joe

Boucher
02-03-2006, 06:27 AM
Welcome! Read the newspaper and attend Auctions you can't believe the good deals that are out there. The good ones don't last long. The Auctions are fun. I bought a Cherry bridgeport for less than the DRO and power feed cost. This was in a small town classified ad.

HWooldridge
02-03-2006, 05:10 PM
You might be surprised at what full size mills go for sometimes. I bought a couple of old Bridgeports (1960's vintage) for scrap prices, then sold the worst of the two for twice as much as I paid for both. You just have to look and shop - some auctions bring nutty prices (good for the sellers) but some are REAL cheap. You just never know until you attend a few.

TECHSHOP
02-03-2006, 05:25 PM
Boucher and HWooldridge

I am not a fan of the round column mill/drill.

But no matter how "cheap" a BP may be found, there is still a weight/size/height/transport issues that need to be considered. For many home shops, realizing that and the size of the projects, makes a BP a "non starter".

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

sauer38h
02-04-2006, 12:29 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by TECHSHOP:
But no matter how "cheap" a BP may be found, there is still a weight/size/height/transport issues that need to be considered. For many home shops, realizing that and the size of the projects, makes a BP a "non starter".</font>

That's what I thought until I actually measured one, and measured my available space, and found that a BP with one of the smaller tables takes up hardly any more floor space than a mill-drill on a bench. As usual, the actual numbers tell all, or almost all.

Then of course there was the transport problem. I put up a site showing How To Do It, the idea being that if I, even in my reduced post-heart attack state, could do it, lots of other interested people could too. Then somebody on this very forum ragged on my homemade trailer, I followed the link back, and the rest is history. Not to mention, lowered property values.