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View Full Version : Latest project, Rocker arm for Worthington Gas Engine



IOWOLF
08-17-2001, 05:21 AM
Nice work, well done.

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The tame Wolf !

YankeeMetallic
03-03-2006, 03:58 PM
I just finished making a replacement rocker arm for an 1910 era Worthington gas engine. It is a 1 horse, dual flywheel. It was likely used for running a pump, or cement mixer since it has a cog on the output shaft instead of a flat for a belt.
My buddy that is rebuilding it brought in the sand cast rocker arm which was broken in half. Of course the other half was not to be found. I had to make measurements from the pivot point to the push rod and to the valve spring. I guessed on the other half. I used the lathe to turn the cylindrical center on both sides from a 2" X 3" block of 12L14 steel, then milled the rest. I drilled and tapped the end for the pushrod, installed a stainless bolt so the head was against the push rod. There was a lock nut on the opposite side to lock the bolt so the valve compression could be adjusted. I radiused the ends and the sides leaving the rough marks, and ridge line so it actually looked like the sandcasted original. This was my first attempt at turning a cylinder from the face of a block on the lathe. It was great practice.
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e254/YankeeMetallic/RockerArmWorthington025.jpg
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e254/YankeeMetallic/RockerArmWorthington024.jpg
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e254/YankeeMetallic/RockerArmWorthington023.jpg
http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e254/YankeeMetallic/cropped.jpg

Rustybolt
03-03-2006, 05:23 PM
Nice job!

YankeeMetallic
03-03-2006, 05:30 PM
I forgot to mention that there are oil impregnated bronze washers where the cylinder face meets the casting to reduce friction.

charlie coghill
03-03-2006, 07:36 PM
Not too bad at all.I find doing something like that is a lot of fun.

CCWKen
03-03-2006, 07:56 PM
Way to go! Nice job. I've taken parts before final milling and shot-peened or sand blasted them. It gives that "cast" look. After finish milling, it looks like it came from the factory.

By the way, what's that white stuff? You spill talcum or something? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

YankeeMetallic
03-03-2006, 08:14 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
By the way, what's that white stuff? You spill talcum or something?</font>
Thanks for the compliment. The white stuff is something you probably don't see much of in Texas. It was a bit frosty here in the last few days with about 10" of snow.

dicks42000
03-03-2006, 09:01 PM
Yankeemetallic;
Instead of trying to drill eeny-weenie holes in stainless steel for torch tips, you should be making "Billet" rocker arms for American Chopper folks.....
Nice job by the way.
I bored & rebushed rockers for my Massey-Ferguson backhoe's engine. Setup was a pain, but it beats trying to find used/new ones.
I hope you enjoyed the job.
Rick

wierdscience
03-03-2006, 10:48 PM
Nice job,I love having the satisfaction of making a part that no longer exists,good sense of achievement.

Kansas_Farmer
03-04-2006, 01:04 AM
Heheheheheh..

"I bored & rebushed rockers for my Massey-Ferguson backhoe's engine. Setup was a pain, but it beats trying to find used/new ones.
I hope you enjoyed the job.
Rick"

Well, yer first problem is it says MF on the side...and we all know what MF stands for.... :P

(This Public Service Announcement brought to you by John Deere and your local John Deere Dealer, makers of quality farm equipment for over 125 years.)

Evan
03-06-2006, 11:59 AM
bump

spkrman15
03-06-2006, 06:45 PM
Nice work.

Rob http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

gizmo2
03-07-2006, 12:07 AM
Your buddy is lucky to have such a talented machinist friend. He should buy you cold frosty refreshments now! Nice work, yank!