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jarr88
08-17-2001, 02:34 AM
do you have a link to the article

jarr88
02-25-2006, 05:59 PM
i have done some reacherch and i have come to the conclusion that i am going to use a drill press to turn it imnto a mill .Many peoople think that the spindal is to week and doesnt have a draw bar or a taprerd spindLe. But i have come up with a new design to this drillpress mill i was going to machine a new spindial to hold hudge roller bearings and make a new draw bar to hold a half inch end mill adaptor .During this building time i am taking pictures and i even want to start a website and a form simmilar to this ..


So i was wonder ing to ALLLT HE VIEWEREs what do you think of this whole project and the succes rate

Thanks

speedsport
02-25-2006, 06:07 PM
Ever hear the one about a "snowball in hell"?, Taking into account the reasonable price of imported mills. it begs the question "why"?

tattoomike68
02-25-2006, 06:08 PM
It sound like you are building a mill, not a drillpress.

why not just buy a mill? you will want power downfeed, depth stop and the other goodies to have a good mill.

[This message has been edited by tattoomike68 (edited 02-25-2006).]

TECHSHOP
02-25-2006, 06:32 PM
jarr88:

Succes in the home shop is measured in may ways. Succes in the market place is measured in only one way at the end of the day.

I have seen, in person and on the web, "mills" that have been made from drill presses, woodworking lathe headstocks, ShopSmith type machines, and woodworking morticers. Some of the builders/owners are happier that others with the result.

If your are making this machine because you want to, some of the "best ideas" come from someone "just foolin' around" in the shop. I wish you a good build, with fun and learning.
The pictures with clear explainations are always welcome, even if the end result is a "failure" the machining and problem solving is always interesting to me.

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

goatherd
02-25-2006, 06:38 PM
thats a grand idea, do not let anyone tell you diferently. People like you with drive and ambition helped make this country what it is today. I am building a wire EDM out of old bicycle parts and wornout aluminum foil hats.

snowman
02-25-2006, 06:55 PM
"wornout aluminum foil hats."

Umm....do they wear out?

Please tell me they dont.

TECHSHOP
02-25-2006, 07:01 PM
goatherd:

Are you a snow goat that came south for the winter?

I think the jarr88 be one of them foreign, international type lads, that might make his country great by using Robertson screws http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

speedsport
02-25-2006, 08:38 PM
"Helped make this country what it is today"

I.m not sure that is a good recommendation anymore, it was once. Gone but not forgotten.

JRouche
02-25-2006, 08:55 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
During this building time i am taking pictures

So i was wonder ing to ALLLT HE VIEWEREs what do you think of this whole project and the succes rateThanks</font>

I love pictures. Success? That can only be determined by you. Success is achieving your goals, make some goals.

I think the project is a good HSM project and especially if you have the parts on the shelf already. Looking forward to the progress reports....JRouche

CCWKen
02-25-2006, 09:49 PM
Didn't Evan mill on his drill press? Of course, it weighs 3000lbs. or something like that. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Mcgyver
02-25-2006, 10:59 PM
goatherd, that cracked me up, thx http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

viewers of what?!?! where's the design we're to critic?

what research? generally the more people know about this proposition, the more they realize its a lousy idea - hey prove us wrong, post the design!

seriously though, if get to the point of understanding what is require in a mill and what is available with a drill, it is not compelling to build a forum around, much less a machine. What are the specs on the bearings you are using?



[This message has been edited by Mcgyver (edited 02-26-2006).]

torker
02-25-2006, 11:43 PM
A waste of breath

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

jarr88
02-26-2006, 12:22 AM
to clear things up i am using the drill press housing to build around a cnc machine there for the x/y table is going to be about 18 inches by 2 1/2 feet long built out of i inch pipes

-the beRINGS I AM USING ARE ROLLER

This mill will be used to cut aluminum and soft materials and will be manual too.

I will post pictures a.s.a.p. to prove you all wrong

Evan
02-26-2006, 12:26 AM
It can be done and I have done it. However, my drill press is a Strands and it uses the same head and spindle as a very similar milling machine made by Arboga. It has a very large tapered roller bearing on the bottom end of the spindle and can take the side forces. The equivalent new model as mine, which hasn't changed much, costs over $3000.

An ordinary run-of-the-mill drill press simply won't work as a mill.

"Evan is building a mill on a big heavy ol' drill press"

Huh? No I'm not. I set up the drill press for milling quite a while ago. The mill I am building now has nothing to do with that.


[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 02-26-2006).]

darryl
02-26-2006, 12:48 AM
I always like to see people with ambition, and willing to try things, even if it becomes only a learning experience and not a workable product in the final analysis. What you are proposing probably won't result in a workable mill. I think you'll spend more time babying the thing to try getting the milling job done, and it won't be a happy experience using the resulting machine, though it will be satisfying to have created a mill out of a drill press.
From someone who would be most likely to try this conversion (me), I wouldn't be doing this myself. I've made a pseudo skil saw from an angle grinder, milled aluminum on my table saw, converted a drill press into a horizontal boring machine, etc, basically making something do what it wasn't intended for, but I wouldn't make a mill from a drill press unless the press was a really solid older model that's abnormally sturdy. Just my opinion.

Alistair Hosie
02-26-2006, 01:37 AM
I once designed a set of inflatable dentures for those embarking on a long sea voyage in case they threw up overboard and lost them smart eh http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gifAlistair

[This message has been edited by Alistair Hosie (edited 02-26-2006).]

torker
02-26-2006, 05:39 AM
edited




[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

IOWOLF
02-26-2006, 05:58 AM
Well jarr88, all I have to say is Good Luck with that.

Whats next a snowplow? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

------------------
The tame Wolf !

JRouche
02-26-2006, 11:01 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
I will post pictures a.s.a.p. to prove you all wrong</font>

Well heck, with an attitude like that why even ask any questions here. JRouche

doug931
02-26-2006, 11:42 AM
Jar88 has been posting fairly regularly ove on The Third Hand forum. As far as i can tell, he doesnt have lathe either. So I suppose he is going to use the drill press to turn a new spindle.
When he first came up on the board I invited him to come up and visit my shop( I live an hours drive from Vegreville)
I guess he is not interested enough to see a real shop in operation. Doug

DICKEYBIRD
02-26-2006, 11:50 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
....the x/y table is going to be about 18 inches by 2 1/2 feet long built out of i inch pipes

-the beRINGS I AM USING ARE ROLLER</font>Sounds like a modified cranky John Kleinbauer CNC router table with rollerblade bearings. They're great for balsa, plywood and other light work. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Maybe not so good for accurate machining of aluminum. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gif

reggie_obe
02-26-2006, 02:39 PM
There are a surplus of good used horizontal mills available. They can cut aluminum, steel, etc. better and faster than a vertical mill and are more rigid. If you can re-orient you thinking 90 degrees you can probably pick up a capable horizontal mill for less than the parts cost of your conversion project.
How do you intend to true up the pipe you are going to use for your ways?

Tinkerer
02-26-2006, 03:18 PM
Here are a couple... that have been done

Delta drill press into a 4 axis mill (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15408&highlight=cnc+mill+from+a+drill+press)

and

Building a Mill from a Drill (http://www.pathcom.com/~vhchan/cnc/cnc.html)

jarr88
02-26-2006, 05:45 PM
I have already machines the spindle on the mill .And i am machinig it on my on my new busy bee metal lathe

jarr88
02-26-2006, 05:53 PM
To clear things up the x/y table is 1 ich pipe and the bearings are linear bearings so it will be very ridgid

TECHSHOP
02-26-2006, 06:02 PM
jarr88:

Don't get discouraged or angry. Just keep thinking and working. In the end you will know more than when you started, and more importently you will have experience in design trade offs, and practical how to. That will carry you far, no matter what else others may say about your idea.


------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

Dok
02-26-2006, 07:07 PM
Here's where you start.........
http://cgi.ebay.com/Heavy-Duty-Bench-Drill-Press-PLANS-built-w-pipe-parts_W0QQitemZ7593124512QQcategoryZ12579QQrdZ1QQc mdZViewItem

Evan
02-26-2006, 11:46 PM
This is what mine looks like. Even this is only suitable for fairly light work.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/dpress1.jpg

ahidley
02-27-2006, 08:55 AM
"inflatable dentures " !!!!! *LOL* and if ya fell overboard it would act as a live preserver. Assuming you still had them in your mouth!

jarr88
02-27-2006, 10:06 AM
did you do that yourself (build the spindle)
do you have more photos

Thanks

Evan
02-27-2006, 10:42 AM
jarr88,

I presume you are asking me?

I had to modify the existing spindle as it cannot accept a drawbar. I made an adapter for the nose that allows for morse taper collets and tooling to be securely retained. The spindle itself was not modified other than the attachment of the retaining device which looks like this:

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/hold1.jpg

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/hold2.jpg



[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 02-27-2006).]

J Tiers
02-27-2006, 11:03 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tinkerer:
Here are a couple... that have been done

Delta drill press into a 4 axis mill (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15408&highlight=cnc+mill+from+a+drill+press)

and

Building a Mill from a Drill (http://www.pathcom.com/~vhchan/cnc/cnc.html)</font>

If you go look at the first link, you will see that the thing now no longer really resembles a drillpress.

New almost everything....

Just goes to show that the basic drillpress was eventually found good really only for the head casting......

Grizzly and others have their cheapest mill-drills actually made from a drillpress. Standard drillpress features, maybe they changed the bearings etc. But vertical feed on those still looks like a DP, per the pics I have seen.

It might be better to start with a basic mill-drill and move forward from that.

Why re-invent the wheel if you don't have to?

torker
02-27-2006, 11:44 AM
gone

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

reggie_obe
02-27-2006, 03:54 PM
A number of people on this board have made a correct statement. By the time you are done you will have learned a great deal, or at least one thing... For the money and time you will spend on the project to turn a sub-standard chinese drillpress into a less than fully functional mill, you could have bought a chinese mill for less. Plus get more value, capacity and versatility.

jarr88
02-27-2006, 05:41 PM
i am just using the drill press casting and scraping every thing except the motor
I had priced it out about 100$ for the milling spindle

jarr88
02-27-2006, 05:44 PM
homemade -the end mill holder spindle

IOWOLF
02-27-2006, 05:46 PM
Evan, that looks identicle to my Bartons and Oliver turretlathe collet holder.

------------------
The tame Wolf !

Steel Wheels
02-27-2006, 05:47 PM
It is unfortunate for sure that we have to look in China for the tooling that was once made here. For that we only have the greedy companies,the unions and ourselves to blame.Sometimes necessity is the mother of invention and our wallets can't handle the price of high quality.Between K-Mart, Wal-Mart and Sears and a host of others,they have made the tool industry a throwaway commodity. As China will do with the machine shop tool industry.Kudos on your project

Fasttrack
02-27-2006, 05:56 PM
How come do i get the feeling your a kid my age trying to figure out a cheap alternative to good tools? Maybe its the something for nothing attitude. I've found sometimes you really do get what you pay for. I am a student and don't have alot of money so i understand the desire to make as much yourself out of junk or cheap stuff as possible, but in the interest of accuracy, its better just to buy a quality tool than make a crumby one, especially if, like me, you don't have alot of experiencing. Seems to me machine work is something you want to learn as you go; apart from the personal injury possible, there is alot of money in tooling and the last thing you want to do is really screw something up from inexperience. Just my two cents.

p.s. As long as your having fun and learning something, and don't mind maybe screwing up a few things ( i did my fair share of damage to lathe cutter bits from inexpierence, and i'm sure i'll make plenty of more mistakes before i kick the can) then good luck and i know i'd like to see pics.

[This message has been edited by Fasttrack (edited 02-27-2006).]

jarr88
02-27-2006, 09:02 PM
well you are right ii am a student well to be exact i am 15 years old i have and interst in this machining side.I am building this project because i dont need a big cnc mill i just wanted something that wouldnt take a lot of money and it is a good experience.If i wanted i could bite the dust like i did on my lathe but i wanted to build something fron scratch and it makes for a good project and lots for good photos to show others .

And i will have photoes soon

torker
02-27-2006, 09:39 PM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

jarr88
02-27-2006, 10:15 PM
for the z axis i am not going for ball screw nuts but rather a brass block witha slit on the side to take up the backlash.would aluminum be a better pick

jarr88
02-27-2006, 10:25 PM
i have another big question to this project i want this to have a drill press quill travel for drilling holes but that makes the design more complicated to build should i have it or it will just weeken the whole design in all

TECHSHOP
02-27-2006, 11:14 PM
jarr88:

I am not to sure what you are asking exactly:

I the Z axis part is sliding (moving) against steel(?) or cast iron(?), then bronze or brass would be better than AL.

I am also not sure what size DP you are starting with, it maybe easier to make the whole "head" move up/down with rack, like a mortising machine or drill stand.

I don't know how to make a "fine" down feed if you "fix" the spindle in the head casting.

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

Evan
02-27-2006, 11:22 PM
Aluminum isn't a very good bearing material. Brass is much better.

Weston Bye
02-28-2006, 05:13 AM
The first year of HSM Magazine had an article by Rudy Kouhoupt about turning a (then $99) import drill press and x-y table into a mill. I tried it. It worked but had very limited capacity. I could machine steel, but it required a lot of patience.

If you've got nothing better, it's better than nothing.

By the way, the article is still available in Shop Wisdom Rudy Kouhoupt Volume 1 - check the store on this website.

Wes

jarr88
02-28-2006, 10:02 AM
where is this site

Weston Bye
02-28-2006, 10:27 AM
This web site - The Home Shop Machinist -the one you are currently on. Go to the home page, place your cursor on Shopping and select Store on the dropdown menu.

Rudy's book has a vast wealth of information and projects - especially for the beginner.

There. A shameless plug for a product by our gracious host here, The Village Press.

Wes

uute
02-28-2006, 12:06 PM
Jarr- Click on the Home Shop Machinist logo at the top of this page - Go from there

jarr88
02-28-2006, 04:53 PM
hey wes1 do you have some pictures to show

mochinist
02-28-2006, 05:05 PM
Do you go trolling much jarr88?

jarr88
02-28-2006, 05:13 PM
you mean to
-To fish for by trailing a baited line from behind a slowly moving boat
yah oky there

mochinist
02-28-2006, 05:34 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
you mean to
-To fish for by trailing a baited line from behind a slowly moving boat
yah oky there</font>

Not quite.


Wen ar wee goaing to cee sum photoes?

Weston Bye
02-28-2006, 07:36 PM
Sorry that was long ago - 1982. I still have the drillpress and x-y table, but they are not mated to each other anymore. A mini mill took its place.

Wes

jarr88
02-28-2006, 10:30 PM
what spindile modidfivation did you do it

torker
02-28-2006, 10:35 PM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

torker
02-28-2006, 10:45 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
spindile modidfivation </font>
jarr...Holy Smoke! You have to pay a little more attention to your spelling.
I hire a lot of younger people. To be honest...if I see a resume with spelling like that, it goes right in the garbage can.
I don't know what is up with the spelling nowadays. I hang out on a couple of fourwheeldrive boards and the young guys there are horrid spellers.
If my old teachers would have caught me spelling like that they would have taken the strap to my hands.
Something to consider! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

jarr88
02-28-2006, 10:47 PM
there is just 2 photoes is that all

jarr88
02-28-2006, 10:49 PM
i am not to good on the keyboard,
Thanks

jarr88
02-28-2006, 10:53 PM
didnt even see that let me try agian spindle modification


[This message has been edited by jarr88 (edited 03-01-2006).]

IOWOLF
03-01-2006, 04:04 AM
He spelled "****" correctly,Go figure.

Weston Bye
03-01-2006, 04:06 AM
No spindle modifications. I just held the endmill in the drill chuck. I even used a flycutter, just held in the chuck. The drill press came with a depth stop that was 2 nuts on a threaded rod that traveled up and down with the quill and passed through a hole in a projection on the head casting. I moved one of the nuts on the rod below the projection so that one was above and one below, pinching the projection and set the depth by adjusting the nuts with an end wrench.
It was not perfect, but worked until I could do better.

Wes

jarr88
03-01-2006, 09:52 AM
i wolf take your **** comments else where;s

Leigh
03-01-2006, 04:02 PM
The problem is not the spindle, it's the rest of the machine. There's a reason why the Bridgeport weighs 2000 pounds.

------------------
Leigh W3NLB

jarr88
03-01-2006, 06:48 PM
so the body on a drill press is the main problem

Evan
03-01-2006, 07:23 PM
The main problem is that it is a drill press, not a mill. A drill press only needs to take loads vertically along the axis of the spindle. A mill must withstand sideways loads in all directions as well as vertical loads. None of the parts of a drill press are designed to do that.

Weston Bye
03-01-2006, 07:40 PM
Leigh and Evan are right. Even though Rudy (and I) did convert a drill press, it was a sorry substitute for a purpose-built machine, suitable only for light cuts in plastic, aluminum or Velveeta. Steel, only if you're desperate.

As I said before, If you've got nothing better, it's better than nothing. Just don't invest a lot of time or money in it.

Wes

Scatterplot
03-01-2006, 07:46 PM
Dude don't let these guys fool you. For light work, just put the mill into the chuck and get a cheapo HF table for it, it'll do just fine.

(PLEASE DONT FLAME just kidding! Saw a guy one time that wanted to mill without a mill, just a DP with an x-y positioning table, I told him no probly not a good idea but who knows what happened.)

And also, as another student, a young'un on here, get a job mowing lawns. At 15, that's the best money you're gonna make. I'm 20 now, and that's the fastest money I've made yet.

darryl
03-01-2006, 07:48 PM
Any inexpensive drill press is going to have a hollow column, and they're not very thick. There will be a lack of rigidity there, which could be helped if you fill it with concrete. I would add a good sized threaded rod centered within this as well, since you might use it to help keep the column stable if you upgrade the base.
There's usually not a good fit between the head and the quill, and the setscrew or bolt that's there serves mainly to keep it from spinning within the head. At the very least, you'd want to choose a press which has the least amount of play in this area. Of the small drill press offerings, the delta seems to have the least play, though I suspect you could pick through a few of the same model and find one which is the best in this regard. The salesperson will have to be very accomodating to allow you to do this, but IMHO, you should pay attention to the fit of the parts before you buy one. Maybe it's too late for that now, I don't know.
The head is usually secured to the column with setscrews, and is not usually reguired to be moved on the column. I would epoxy it together, and use the setscrews, if you don't want to slide the head on the column. Anything you can do to make the machine more rigid will help. If you remove the belt guard 'bucket', you might see that the column could come right through if you remove a pin. It would make sense to at least move the head lower on the column such that you could epoxy around between the column and the head- again something you could do to help improve the rigidity. If you do this and fill the column with concrete, you will definitely minimize flex. The added weight will be a bonus also.
The belt guard could have a threaded rod coming through it centered about the column without interfering with the belt, but if the column came right through, say if you were to use that to anchor the top of the column to a more rigid structure, then you'd want to make sure the belt will clear it on both sides. If you do this mod, it's obvious you'll lose some clearance between the spindle and the base. By the way, if part of your plan is to have the head adjustable up and down on the column, then you can still do the epoxy thing, only you don't want it to stick to the column, only inside the head casting. You can use a mold release on the column where the epoxy would be, and you'll get a tight fit, but still moveable.
The table usually has a split collar that tightens around the column to secure it- not much you can improve on there. I don't know how well the column is fixed into it's base mounting flange, but the cemented in threaded rod could help to keep it from shifting there. If your table assembly is going to take the place of the existing table, then the base is just a mounting flange to hold the whole thing upright. If you are planning to make your table onto the base somehow, maybe the threaded rod idea will help make it better, and maybe it can attach to a larger metal plate under the flange, which could give you mounting holes that are farther apart- here you would be able to shim to get the machine in tram.
You could use this extra metal plate in conjunction with the existing base to help solidify that end of the machine. Adding weight here will only help as well.
I'm offering these ideas not knowing if you could or would use them, but anyway good luck with the project.

TECHSHOP
03-01-2006, 07:53 PM
Evan:

You beat me to it, again. I typed up "your answer" but got knocked of the air and it went POOF.

jarr88:
I think what you are trying to do is a good thinking and learning experience. Maybe I "defend" that too much, but that spark is too easy to put out. I don't expect you will make something superior to what is already "on the market" today, but 5 years?, 10years? Just keep working on the design, build your "prototype MK 1", then apply lessons learned to "prototype MK 2" http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

------------------
Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

jarr88
03-01-2006, 08:58 PM
hey evan is that all the pictures you have of the drill press restoration

[This message has been edited by jarr88 (edited 03-01-2006).]

torker
03-01-2006, 09:45 PM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

jarr88
03-01-2006, 09:53 PM
i have already taken the press apart so tommorow i am going to pick up some heavy tubing
-What other suggestions to you have
Thanks

torker
03-01-2006, 10:11 PM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

torker
03-01-2006, 10:38 PM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

Evan
03-01-2006, 11:28 PM
Speaking of improving cheap drill press tables there is one simple mod that anyone can do that helps a lot. The added aluminum brace keeps the table from flexing down under load and causing the holes to be drilled off square. One could use just about any handy bit of strap material to do this.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/dptablebrace.jpg

I do have more pics of the restoration of the Strands but there was nothing special about it. Complete cleaning and removal of rust and old paint, dissassembly of the motor, gearbox and spindle, cleaned the motor and re-laquered the windings and re-greased all bearings. I changed the oil in the gearhead and adjusted some clearances with shims. Took apart the spindle and cleaned and relubed the bearings, repaired the return spring. The biggest item was having the table turned down .050" to clean it up because it was pretty dinged up. I couldn't do that myself because it wouldn't fit my lathe so I paid a job shop to do it. That cost me $50.

reggie_obe
03-02-2006, 07:51 AM
A number of member have given suggestions to improve your project and pointed out the limitations your completed project will have. Have you thought about abandoning the verical mill idea and instead buying a small horizontal mill? At auctions they usually sell cheap, as few dealers want them. Last auction I attended, a small horizontal mill sold for $20. You should be able to find one for one to two hundred. Which is probably about what you'll spend on material for you conversion. Cutters are always cheap, I don't spend more than a dollar or two for surplus cutters.

jarr88
03-02-2006, 10:06 AM
they are really that cheap wow
_are they in working condition

Evan
03-02-2006, 10:10 AM
You already have a small horizontal mill. It just happens to look like a lathe.

jarr88
03-02-2006, 10:20 AM
you mean mill on the lathe

Evan
03-02-2006, 10:34 AM
That is right. A lathe is a very handy small horizontal mill. You need a couple of collets and a drawbar to hold the cutters, a chuck won't do as it gets in the way and may lose grip on the cutter. You also need some sort of simple table to hold the work in place of the compound.

Like this:

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/34face3.jpg

In this example I have a fly cutter in a chuck. For regular end mills I use collets to hold them. The work height is adjusted by using various thicknesses of material to support the work when it is clamped to the table.

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 03-02-2006).]

torker
03-02-2006, 10:47 AM
ttt

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

reggie_obe
03-02-2006, 12:09 PM
I didn't make any geographical price claims and the $20 that this mill brought was absurdly low. But no one wanted it. But if you could pick up a horizontal mill for $200 south of the Canadian border, would it be worth the road trip?

jarr88
03-02-2006, 06:09 PM
hey torker do you have any other modifications on the drill press spindle

jarr88
03-02-2006, 10:33 PM
i will have some pictures of my progress soon

jarr88
03-02-2006, 10:47 PM
hey evan,i was looking in the past posts and i see you are building a cnc mini mill
do you have more pic all i seen was 2 of the head ,and i would love to see the x,y table (pic)you are building prity much the same thing as i am doing

do you live in canada because i was wonder ing how fast little machine shop ships to canada

Evan
03-02-2006, 11:49 PM
Heh. No pics of the entire mill yet. I'm not going to show much more until it is about to run. I don't know when that will be but it is getting closer.

Little Machine Shop ships to Canada and I have ordered from them. I had some problems with my last order that were absolutely no fault of theirs (it was our customs that screwed up and lost the item) but they replaced the item at no extra cost anyway. I am very happy both with the items I ordered and their service and prices.

Millman
03-03-2006, 01:52 AM
Evan, that fly cutter is great. More people should realise that Factory made tooling is not worth the expense. Made so many like it, just to save the CO. money, or is it ingenuity?? The day of competing with foreign soils is amongst us. Did you learn that years ago, or did you stumble upon it??

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BFH

torker
03-03-2006, 04:59 AM
ttt



[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

Evan
03-03-2006, 08:47 AM
"Did you learn that years ago, or did you stumble upon it??"

Umm, I dunno. I haven't ever seen one but I needed a way to do some milling so I made one.

Jarr,

You already have a lathe. I suggest you make use of it to it's full capability before embarking on a project that may not have a very satisfactory outcome. Make some simple milling attachments for your lathe and when you gain some experience using them you will be better able to judge what you will need in a "real" vertical mill.

uute
03-03-2006, 11:13 PM
Hesitate even to say it, especially with the flimsy nature of an 8' DP, but there were a couple of old articles from Popular Mech about mounting an arm from the collum w/ a bearing in it to take most of the side thrust for milling. An endmill holder/ spindle went through the bearing, chucked up in drill chuk. Again,it would be very light duty. Also would us up a lot of head room on a bench model.

Evan
03-06-2006, 09:55 AM
bump

doug931
03-06-2006, 12:47 PM
I made n attatchment like the one uute refers to. Two ball bearings add support to the spindle. Clamps on the vertical post. I used some home made flycutters,very light duty.
Jar, you can have it if you come and get it. Doug

kenrinc
03-06-2006, 01:40 PM
There is a PDF available via the Gingery Yahoo group that shows how to modify a small drill press to be a "poor mans mill". Good article. You will need to register for the group to access it. It looks to have been an article from Model Engineers Workshop. And the guy is from Canada :-) I'd post it but looks like no attachments here.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gingery_machines/files/

Ken

[This message has been edited by kenrinc (edited 03-06-2006).]

[This message has been edited by kenrinc (edited 03-06-2006).]

jarr88
03-06-2006, 05:33 PM
doug to you have some pictures
mill

IOWOLF
03-06-2006, 05:54 PM
I was hopeing this thread would be gone when the board came back up.

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The tame Wolf !

jarr88
03-06-2006, 09:31 PM
your really funny!!!!!!!!

J Tiers
03-07-2006, 12:05 AM
I have been looking at this thread from time-to-time.

If I had to translate the original request, adding in all the stuff that is included, but not considered, it would go something like this:

"I want to start with a drill press, and make it into a vertical mill that will work sorta ok, will take a lot of time to make, and even more to make right, that when done will have cost more than a store-boughten new or used one that works better, and I STILL won't have a drawbar to hold in cutters unless I make a completely new spindle and quill assembly for it, which I will therefore have to do, costing even more money and time."

If that is what you want, a choice only you can make, then fine....

if not, if the goal is a tool, there may be a better way.

As an EE, I suffer from teh "engineer's 'yes' disease".... that's where you reflexively answer "yes" if asked "can you do/make/design this XXXXXX?".

However, I have learned that time is more than money, and spending a lot of it just on the means to get towards what I really want is not always appropriate.

In your case, I think I would re-examine the goals, and see why I wanted to make the mill. It could be a good project, and I am not going to say don't do it.

But, if a mill for other work is the goal, rather than "the process of making a mill" being the goal, it makes more sense to figure out how to earn the money to buy a workable one and sufficient tooling to use it.

Think about it, and see what you want, how much time you have and are willing to spend doing it, and so forth.

There are folks who have made working and very usable 40% of full size bridgeports etc, from scratch. They generally seem to have taken 2000 hours or so. That's 8 hours a day for a year, less weekends and off-time. basically 40 hour weeks.

Your project is less than that, but if it only took 150 hours, that's still over three months of at least 2 hours a day work. And, any goof-ups will take time and cost materials.

jarr88
03-08-2006, 11:42 AM
i have come to the desiceion to buy fron l.ms the spinidle box for 80$

KyMike
03-08-2006, 06:33 PM
There is an article in the January 1969 Popular Mechanics about converting a drill press to do light duty milling, using an outboard spindle support to take the side thrust and flycutter-type cutting tools that use 3/16" square lathe tool bits fitted into toolholders that fit into the existing chuck. I don't know how well this actually worked but maybe there is a useful idea or two here.

Mike

Scatterplot
03-08-2006, 06:44 PM
Jarr, a little bit of probably helpful advice, don't take it the wrong way but here it is. You will catch more flies with honey, as they say, and while your method of short responses and questions without much emphasis on grammar, spelling, punctuation, or appearance of well-thought-out responses is perfectly suited for and even encouraged on other boards you are most likely a part of (as am I), on this board sarcastic remarks and short, snippity answers make it look like you are wanting others to do the thinking for you. Please don't take this like I'm flaming you, but your posts come across as being (in the context of this particular board) as being flippant and kinda arrogant. I don't want this to be that way, but I just thought I would point that out.


About your project, I can't really offer too much advice, but I would say if you really want to do it more power to you. I know tons of things that people have said were impossible that I believe I could do, so if you are doing this for a good experience I would say go for it. Good luck!

psomero
03-08-2006, 07:46 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Scatterplot:
Jarr, a little bit of probably helpful advice, don't take it the wrong way but here it is. You will catch more flies with honey, as they say, and while your method of short responses and questions without much emphasis on grammar, spelling, punctuation, or appearance of well-thought-out responses is perfectly suited for and even encouraged on other boards you are most likely a part of (as am I), on this board sarcastic remarks and short, snippity answers make it look like you are wanting others to do the thinking for you. Please don't take this like I'm flaming you, but your posts come across as being (in the context of this particular board) as being flippant and kinda arrogant. I don't want this to be that way, but I just thought I would point that out.


About your project, I can't really offer too much advice, but I would say if you really want to do it more power to you. I know tons of things that people have said were impossible that I believe I could do, so if you are doing this for a good experience I would say go for it. Good luck!</font>

ding ding ding! we got a winner!


i see three threads on the same topic. all three are completely different trains of thought and i am still awaiting to see any sort of coherent plan that will actually pan out into anything.

what i have been seeing, though, is an arrogant attitude that has pissed all over any non-hostile suggestions that perhaps such a project is unwise and will be nothing more than a money pit long before any chips will ever be made.

personally, i know it's possible to do. it's just not reasonable or an effective use of time or money. i'm working on turning my mill into a cnc and the damn thing was built intentionally to be converted to cnc and i'm having troubles (no time and money), so i can personally attest to the difficulty of taking on such a monumental task.

jar88, i'm not trying to shoot down your dreams or whatever it may seem like, but if you're going to be a little snot to the experienced people who are advising you rethink your project, you better have your flame suit on and be prepared for a ****storm.

i can relate to the youth thing, seeing that i'm only 19 myself, and i will tell you this: if you wanna hang with the old guys, listen to what they have to say because they know what the hell they're talking about. arrogance and an "oh, i'll tell you" attitude doesn't work with people who have been messing around with machining since before you or i were born.

jarr88
03-08-2006, 07:52 PM
hey buddy ,maybe you cant convert your mill into cnc is because u dont know what the hell you are talking about

No offense or anything just a thing to help you out

THE SOUP NAZI
03-08-2006, 08:18 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
hey buddy ,maybe you cant convert your mill into cnc is because u dont know what the hell you are talking about

No offense or anything just a thing to help you out </font>

Uh oh....no more soup for you!

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:21 PM
are you a black guy because you talk al slang and what ps you might want to get that checked out

psomero
03-08-2006, 08:23 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jarr88:
hey buddy ,maybe you cant convert your mill into cnc is because u dont know what the hell you are talking about

No offense or anything just a thing to help you out </font>

no, it's because i'm taking 18 units of mechanical engineering courses and working 10 hours a week still. note i didn't say "skill" when i was talking about why it ain't done yet.

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:25 PM
well the way you talk makes you sound like no skill man

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:27 PM
ps. you are tacking m.e and you dont think the drill press mill will work shame on you ..

Joel
03-08-2006, 08:30 PM
Well, those last few remarks should take care of anyone really wanting to help you out.

Interesting thing – I had no idea that psomero or Fasttrack were younger until they pointed it out. They posses functional and effective writing skills and try not to insult or irritate.

[This message has been edited by Joel (edited 03-08-2006).]

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:32 PM
thanks for pointing the clear out, not

psomero
03-08-2006, 08:35 PM
well, i'll let some pictures do the convincing:

http://home.pacbell.net/psomero/sprocket.jpg

that was two years ago when i was still taking shop class.

http://home.pacbell.net/psomero/bike1.jpg

that's what i built over the summer and am getting tooled up to do when i have time.

http://home.pacbell.net/psomero/joystick1.jpg

here's the joystick i built the interface electronics to the computer for.

http://home.pacbell.net/psomero/image191.jpg

here's the project the joystick boards are going to go in (and the mill in the background).

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:39 PM
ha ha ha ha ha ha ha interesting

jarr88
03-08-2006, 08:39 PM
do you live in canada

psomero
03-08-2006, 09:03 PM
california

JRouche
03-08-2006, 09:14 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
bump</font>

Sorry Evan but there really was no need to bump this one, kid is a jerk...JRouche

jarr88
03-08-2006, 09:20 PM
explain on that jerk theory of yours

Willy
03-08-2006, 09:32 PM
There have been a large number of excellent craftsman that have been very generous with their time and knowlege to assist and guide you in the pursuit of your project.And as has also been pointed out these same craftsmen have been working with metal two,three ,or four times longer than you have been sucking wind. If by your rude and arogant behavior you are telling these men that they know not of what they speak,fine. Just don't ask any more questions if you already know the answer.I and others will await your photos so that you can tell all of us how it's done.

[This message has been edited by Willy (edited 03-08-2006).]

jarr88
03-08-2006, 09:36 PM
OH YOU WILL SEE , you inovator people will get a fine taste of some new design

goatherd
03-08-2006, 11:25 PM
"OH YOU WILL SEE , you inovator people will get a fine taste of some new design"
This would make a nice sig. Or just a general life philosophy, kind of a anti-zen.

jarr88
03-08-2006, 11:37 PM
come on get real

torker
03-09-2006, 12:21 AM
Ummm....Neil?



[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-09-2006).]

Scatterplot
03-09-2006, 12:52 AM
Guys, guys, guys. I figured it out. His shift key and period keys are missing, and his autocorrect is set to "douche".

IOWOLF
03-09-2006, 06:02 AM
Get busy, you are not going to build that thing talking here,AND GET OFF THIS BOARD and dont come back till its done.

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The tame Wolf !

jarr88
03-09-2006, 12:01 PM
scatterplot the only thing you are going to be missing is a your fingers

goatherd
03-09-2006, 02:39 PM
"is a your fingers"
siete un italiano?

topct
03-09-2006, 03:18 PM
Sorry, it appears that that user (jarr88) is no longer registered for our forums. No profile information is available for that user.

tattoomike68
03-09-2006, 03:22 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by topct:
Sorry, it appears that that user (jarr88) is no longer registered for our forums. No profile information is available for that user.</font>


Oh well he was a little punk troll.

Fasttrack
03-09-2006, 03:31 PM
"i can relate to the youth thing, seeing that i'm only 19 myself, and i will tell you this: if you wanna hang with the old guys, listen to what they have to say because they know what the hell they're talking about. arrogance and an "oh, i'll tell you" attitude doesn't work with people who have been messing around with machining since before you or i were born."

Absolutely!!

J Tiers
03-09-2006, 03:37 PM
Somewhere, somehow, "Backpfeifengesicht" seems to fit into this thread.

Not that this is the ONLY thread like that....... exactly.....

IOWOLF
03-09-2006, 04:56 PM
Yippie.

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The tame Wolf !