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torker
03-20-2006, 07:04 AM
Yesterday I "finally" started getting my mill/drill ready for the installation of the DRO I bought.
Then it dawned on me...all the stuff I'm adding to this thing is getting in the way of the openings where I usually oil the ways and X table leadscrew.
Two choices the way I see it.
Drill the tables and install shop built ball oilers.
Or, build some kind of one shot oiler.
I've never even stood beside a one shot oiler so I'm not sure how they work.
How do you know if all the tubes, hoses, etc. are getting the proper amount of oil?
Seems the best(?) way would be to install 6 tubes in total.
One for each side of the ways X and Y and one for each of the lead screws.
I like the ball oiler idea better but I'm sure I'll run into problems just trying to get to them as I keep the mill table loaded with any gadjet that'll fit on it. Then I have two more spin indexers coming that I'll make something out of and I have a new angle table coming that might find a permanent place on the table as well.
So what do you real guys think?
Thanks!
Russ

SGW
03-20-2006, 07:46 AM
I generally slather oil directly onto the ways with my fingers.

Leigh
03-20-2006, 08:11 AM
I squirt it on from an oil can. Once before I start work, and during the day when I think about it. Run the table to one extreme and oil all exposed surfaces, then run it to the other extreme and repeat. On most machines there's enough overtravel to get the oil everywhere.

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Leigh

pcarpenter
03-20-2006, 12:16 PM
One-shot and automatic oilers use a little manifold into which screw "metering" units that establish the correct oil volume to each location. from those metering units go simple small (usually nylon) tubes that simply drip onto the points in question.

In the case of something as simple as a mill/drill, I would do as suggested and oil the ways externally. For home-shop use, this may be more efficient than a whole shot of oil applied everywhere at once. I find that in my home-use only shop, things need oiling at different times.

For the leadscrews, I would simply drill the table in a strategic locaionand tap it for a hex set screw you can remove when you want to oil it. Bridgeport mills (prior to those with oilers) worked this way. Sometimes simple is better and more reliable.

Paul

Mcgyver
03-20-2006, 01:03 PM
I'd rather have the oil getting there under pressure, oil gun and zerk fitting or better yet homemade one shot

any one know how these metering units work or can comment more on them? if a certain oil outlets take more pressure than other to drive the same amount of oil through, as I understand it there metering bits somehow equalize that. Without the oil would just pass through the manifold to the passageways with the least resistance.

I’ve also heard they're expensive, i.e. to buy enough to do a mill is not a pleasant thought. I've toyed with different ideas, either through a piston or cylindrical valve to expose each tube to the pressurized oil for a portion of the stroke/revolution. I'd love to do away with the messy oil gun!


[This message has been edited by Mcgyver (edited 03-20-2006).]

torker
03-20-2006, 01:36 PM
I'm with McGyver on this.
My little mill isn't near as easy to oil as it once was.
I have a powerfeed, a chip guard for that,and soon the dro encoder mounted on one end of X(the side of Y actually).
On the other end of the X table I have a fair size chip guard that I keep on my R/T as it's mounted there all the time.
Then I have the whole mill sitting in a deep chip/coolant recovery pan.
This all makes for a pian in the butt to get at the ways to oil them.
I end up with oil dripping all over right where I use the table locks for the Y axis. This is nice...a big gob of oil soakin your sleeve every time you use it.
The setscrew idea sounds pretty darn simple but ball oilers are pretty easy to make (Thanks Mike B!)
McGyver...that's exactly what I was wondering with the equal pressure to each oil outlet. With a simple oil pump of whatever kind...how do we know if everything is getting oil?
I wouldn't really bother too much but I've run this mill 8 hours a day or more on several occasions and I'd like to have a different oiler system.
Thanks!
Russ

Mcgyver
03-20-2006, 02:02 PM
Russ, I was thinking a lever operated pump (easy enough) that over the course of the lever’s motion would move a value (piston or rotary) such that each of the oiling tubes got a shot. The amount of oil each gets is equal and not dependent on pressure as at any given point in the stroke, the pressured end of the pump is only connected to one oil line at a time. using a rotary design, you could even couple it to a home made gear pump and motor for push button oiling. Posh.
It’s something I’ve been meaning to work one, but I’m in a vacuum on it – it would be great to get some ideas out in a thread like this on how it might work and what the challenges are, how commercial units work, any write ups peeps know about etc.

I’ve seen diy manifolds where there’s a manual valve on each line, but I’m sure there’s a better way. with all the machines in our shops and knowledge here…..

Al Messer
03-20-2006, 02:14 PM
Mcgyver, the "metering" system on the South Bend Shaper does not work worth a hoot in my humble opinion. I have taken mine apart several tiems, made sure that the tubes were clean and it still floods one side and won't pump a drop to the other, so I have little confidence in them.

torker
03-20-2006, 04:31 PM
Oh Great! Now i'm sidetracked again! Dangit Mcgyver...now you've got the wheels rolling.
How bout this....hope you can "see" what I do!
A converted (for oil) mini grease gun type pump attached to a machined piece.
This "piece" would either slide on a straight linear or it could follow around a curved (half round) distribution block.
The oiler machined piece (need a name for this part) would have an upside down ball oiler in it.
It would be held in place with a simple cam lock. Once the cam lock was snapped shut it would push the ball oiler down onto a tit in the orifice(sp) which would release the oil pressure from the pump.
Each oiling point would have it's own hole and piping etc(ok... it would be a manifold).
After oiling the first one...unsnap the camlock, this will allow the pump fixture to raise up so it can slide to the next hole.
Snap the camlock shut and give this point a shot of oil.
You could have an "O" ring either on the end of the ball oiler or a seperate ring on each of the oiling holes to seal the ball oiler completely tight.
A rough guess at this (crude but effective maybe)but it's as good as I can do while doing 10 other things http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
I like the half round one...you could swivel the fixture on two flat bars from dead center and it wouldn't take as much room as a straight manifold.
A little trickier to machine the pockets for the ball oiler seats but still easily do able.
Russ

torker
03-20-2006, 04:49 PM
Wait a minute...I have this backwards. The oiler nozzle that fits into the pocket...it should slide up as you lock the camlock.
As it slides up it would open the nozzle. That would do away with the "tit" in the bottom of the manifold holes to open the ball.
I've seen these somewhere but can't think of it now.

CCWKen
03-20-2006, 04:51 PM
Oh boy! Another cobbled up carnival ride. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Can't wait to see this.

TECHSHOP
03-20-2006, 06:26 PM
Since the one-shot oiler on my mill is crapped out, I too am collecting ideas to incorperate in the rebuild. Everytime I think that I got something done, you all raise another "issue" http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

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Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

torker
03-20-2006, 06:34 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by CCWKen:
Oh boy! Another cobbled up carnival ride. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Can't wait to see this.</font>
Whatsamatter Ken...you afraid this thing will look like a home made tractor when it's done http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
OK...why not forget everything I wrote above and just use Zerk fittings for the oiler to pop onto. Would they work with just oil or do you need grease for them to work correctly?
BTW...this wouldn't be called a"One Shot" oiler...it'd be like a six shooter.


[This message has been edited by torker (edited 03-20-2006).]

wierdscience
03-20-2006, 09:36 PM
Here's an idea,look up KBC# 1-456-030,oneshot oiler,$83and change CDN.

Get yourself some 1/8" oil pressure sending tubing from the parts house and some 1/8" NPT compression fittings and go at it.

You need full bore to the ways and about a 1/16" hole feeding the leadscrew nut(should only need one line to it).

Oh and a gallon of 300ssu way oil http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

torker
03-20-2006, 09:38 PM
Weird....but, but, wouldn't that be too easy?

wierdscience
03-20-2006, 09:49 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by torker:
Weird....but, but, wouldn't that be too easy?</font>

Nah,it only seems easy http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

Someday I will share with you my "Polarised thought process" that I use before undertaking any job no matter how large or small http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

gary hart
03-20-2006, 10:53 PM
Just installed this cobbled up mess of a oiler on a cheap import x-y table. My first scraping job and seemed like it took forever to scrape and wanted to make sure it was getting oil where needed. Figured a pressured one shot oiler was only good if there was metering valves for each outlet or else the oil would take the path of least resistance and somebody would get starved. So it is the old grease gun converted for pumping way oil. Got to be a better way.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/ghart3/mini-mill/oilers2xx.jpg

torker
03-21-2006, 07:14 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:
Nah,it only seems easy http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

Someday I will share with you my "Polarised thought process" that I use before undertaking any job no matter how large or small http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

</font>
Darin...so do you need them funny square glasses from the movie theater to make this "process" work? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
Gary...I'd rather use your method than the "oily shirt sleeve" method I use now http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

bpsbtoolman
03-21-2006, 08:08 AM
When I got my J head Bridgeport, outside of good condition the feature I went for was a pump one shot oiler. I thought and still believe this feature if use frequently greatly reduces wear. Even a day or so after I use it I can see the lube moving from under the ways to coat them nicely.
After having 2 newer South Bend lathes that had ball top oilers on the front of there saddles I decided that my older 9" South Bend needed them added to put oil between the wipers instead of just putting oil ahead or behind the wipers where it would do the most good. It seems reasonable if the wipers are working well most of the way oil put on outside the wipers is wiped off and never gets much between the wipers. The older South Bend lathes I have had including a 13" and a Heavy 10 and 9s did not ball top oilers. When I posted an article a while ago one person ( you have to say person now because most responces were from guys, but now Paula who is super smart on metalworking machines has broken the mold). Anyway this person said he put zerk like fitting that could be used with way oil and could pressure oil in many places frequently with great sucess. Maybe a tad overkill.
My older 12" Sheldon Shaper came with ball oilers all over it.
Some years ago before I retired from a Dow Chemical research lab, the machine shop had a supersized Bridgeport mill that everytime you started it up an automatic switch gave it a lube shot.
Walt

pcarpenter
03-21-2006, 05:05 PM
"You need full bore to the ways and about a 1/16" hole feeding the leadscrew nut(should only need one line to it)."

Ummm...no...not exactly, at least not with a one-shot lubricator http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif I have the one shot (manual) system on my Bridgeport series1 mill disassembled stem to stern. Each and every line gets a metering unit of the appropriate size(about $10+ each). None of them is even close to being wide open. Leave one line wide open and your mill will be in a puddle each time you use it, and nearly all the oil will go the path of least resistance. You get some serious runoff anyway with a full stroke on a typical one-shot luber.

here are some sources of information:
http://www.bijur.com
http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/bp.html

I still can't see the value of this on a small mill/drill with limited surface to be lubed unless you are doing some sort of high production work and can't take a couple of minutes with an oiler once in a while. My Bridgeport has one and I will fix it and make it work. However, I will never recover the time spent replacing all the tubing in the system and cleaning it up (a few hours) in the few minutes saved by it each time I oil the machine vs. the old way with an oil gun. If you spend even more time plumbing one and modifying the machine from scratch, it gets even more questionable. I am just a hobbyist. The machine is not used 2 shifts or more per day. I would be suprised if I use it 8 hours a *week*. If I were in your shoes, I would (at most)build myself an oil gun per Guy Lutard and add some oil zerks and save a *bundle* of $ and not pump oil all over the floor in the name of "automation".

The idea is consistent lubrication, so you sure don't need much each time. Some is good, but more isn't necessarily better. The lead screws get nothing nothing more than a few drops on them even with the one shot luber--something you can easily accomplish throught a drip hole. While the lubricant is provided under pressure to get it where it needs to go, that is only because you are trying to force it 6 directions through 6 tiny metering units. After it hits the metering units in a manifold, it just runs through the tubing to each of its final destinations. It is *not* like an oil pump in an IC engine where you effictively have an oil bearing due to continuous pressure.

In my opinion, with regard to ways, there is nothing better than wiping them down and rubbing a little oil on them...much better than just leaving them cruddy and creating a "slurry" of oil and swarf.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but a one-shot system sounds like overkill under the circumstances, unless you were just looking for a project. Good luck with whatever you do though!
Paul

pcarpenter
03-21-2006, 05:15 PM
One other thought that came to mind in re-reading your original post:

If you want the ways/gibs to last longer (the premise of an oiling system), don't keep a million pounds of tooling on the table all the time http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

You are adding to the frictional load and also increasing the squish factor on the oil film you are trying to keep between the way surfaces.
Paul

IOWOLF
03-21-2006, 05:39 PM
I found a One shot oiler in the scrap yard a few years ago and still dont have a use for it,wish I did though.

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The tame Wolf !

wierdscience
03-21-2006, 09:44 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by pcarpenter:
"You need full bore to the ways and about a 1/16" hole feeding the leadscrew nut(should only need one line to it)."

Ummm...no...not exactly, at least not with a one-shot lubricator http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif I have the one shot (manual) system on my Bridgeport series1 mill disassembled stem to stern. Each and every line gets a metering unit of the appropriate size(about $10+ each). None of them is even close to being wide open. Leave one line wide open and your mill will be in a puddle each time you use it, and nearly all the oil will go the path of least resistance. You get some serious runoff anyway with a full stroke on a typical one-shot luber.

here are some sources of information:
http://www.bijur.com
http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/bp.html

I still can't see the value of this on a small mill/drill with limited surface to be lubed unless you are doing some sort of high production work and can't take a couple of minutes with an oiler once in a while. My Bridgeport has one and I will fix it and make it work. However, I will never recover the time spent replacing all the tubing in the system and cleaning it up (a few hours) in the few minutes saved by it each time I oil the machine vs. the old way with an oil gun. If you spend even more time plumbing one and modifying the machine from scratch, it gets even more questionable. I am just a hobbyist. The machine is not used 2 shifts or more per day. I would be suprised if I use it 8 hours a *week*. If I were in your shoes, I would (at most)build myself an oil gun per Guy Lutard and add some oil zerks and save a *bundle* of $ and not pump oil all over the floor in the name of "automation".

The idea is consistent lubrication, so you sure don't need much each time. Some is good, but more isn't necessarily better. The lead screws get nothing nothing more than a few drops on them even with the one shot luber--something you can easily accomplish throught a drip hole. While the lubricant is provided under pressure to get it where it needs to go, that is only because you are trying to force it 6 directions through 6 tiny metering units. After it hits the metering units in a manifold, it just runs through the tubing to each of its final destinations. It is *not* like an oil pump in an IC engine where you effictively have an oil bearing due to continuous pressure.

In my opinion, with regard to ways, there is nothing better than wiping them down and rubbing a little oil on them...much better than just leaving them cruddy and creating a "slurry" of oil and swarf.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but a one-shot system sounds like overkill under the circumstances, unless you were just looking for a project. Good luck with whatever you do though!
Paul</font>

First,no that depends on which type one-shot you have.If it pumps on the pull stroke then yes heavy metering is required,but if the unit pumps on the SPRING LOADED return stroke it only feeds as the line orifice becomes open i.e.when the table moves.In any rate 13ccs of oil on a stroke ain't much.

Those high dollar metering units you can make by simply plugging the holes in the connectors and drilling the plugs to the required size.Machinery's handbook has all the calculations nessicary to do it the hard way if you like,but it is not rocket science.

Putting a one-shot on a machine makes life easier and no you won't have a puddle of oil and swarf on the ways.

That handle is meant to be pulled once each morning no matter how much you use it,any extra you get is what rags are made for.

Besides,with as much junk as Russ has on his table the mill needs all the help it can get.

JRouche
03-21-2006, 09:59 PM
I have a gear head mill/drill I am converting to CNC. I ball milled groves on both ways of the Z-axis, Y-axis and the X-axis. I bored a small hole leading from the outer surface to the milled groves. I tapped the holes for 1/8" NPT and compression fittings go there. I use 1/8" nylon tubing to the compression fittings from proportioning valves threaded into a homemade manifold. The manifold is fed by a NOS bijur automatic pump... Still in the build up phase for the mill but the lube system is a go. Oh, cept for the way lube,,,gee, what way lube to use, ,,I like butter http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//tongue.gif JRouche

torker
03-21-2006, 11:12 PM
Walt...thanks for that. We're all just kicking around some ideas...I don't know which to do yet.
Paul...You are right. I shouldn't have all the junk on my table all the time but I do and I'm not taking it off. I'll be adding more if anything. I bought this thing to make a few bucks and I need the stuff on it to do that.
There is one product I make that requires the swivel base vise (about 80 pounds) and the R/T plus an angle plate.
It wouldn't be worth it if I had to mount these each time.
Darin is right. That's why I want the extra oil. It's really tough to be sure the X leadscrew is even getting oil, there is no room anymore to see up in there (because of the large chip pan). The Y axis isn't a big deal. I can get oil on that just fine.
I do quite a few short cuts then move to the next all with rapid on the moves and returns. I want to be sure it has oil.
Another thing...all the weight I have on this little machine actually helps it to machine better.
Darin...I still have to work on that thought process deal! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
JR...another case for this whole thing. A cnc machine for sure would benefit from this.
Quite a few people are converting these small machines so it may benefit many.
Russ

pcarpenter
03-22-2006, 09:49 AM
Hey if you think the work of adding a central oiler will pay for itself in time savings, by all means go for it. It sounds however, like your real need is to spend the time making a set of "keys" for each of the things you use on the table, allowing them to be quickly bolted and re-fitted accurately as you use them and gotten out of the way when not in use. No sense in covering all your tooling with swarf all the time, not to mention the inconvenience of reducing your effective table size for clamp work. Still, if you are convinced that you can keep a good oil film under the added forces of hundreds of pounds of tooling, more power to you. Are your way surfaces "flaked" or "frosted" (which will tend to hold small amounts of oil)?

Wierdscience-- the system fitted on my Bridgeport mill is a Bijur L2P. It is spring loaded and provides oil on the spring-return stroke. These are designed to make oiling a no-brainer, but do make a mess. Oil running down the side of the mill does nothing for lubrication http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif The oiler feeds a manifold with 6? metering units. From there, there are maybe about 15 or so individual locationssurfaces that are fed oil by oil passages in the castings. Dovetail ways make it more complex since there end up being multiple points that oil has to be provided on each side of each sliding axis.

Because the sliding and gib surfaces all have oil groves cut in them (a must have with an oiler like this). Most of the stroke is able to empty in pretty short order with the mill just sitting. I could pull a full stroke and come back a bit later to a small trickle of oil streaming down the side of the knee at the ways and at the base of the column.

Torker-- you will want to make sure to cut oil relieve groves in the gibs and sliding surfaces. Squirting a dot of oil in the middle of a way surface is not really adequate. Way oil is tacky stuff and it is better to distribute it somewhat than to wait for it to distribute itself by being worked back and forth.

Good luck with your project!
Paul

Leigh
03-22-2006, 10:03 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by gary hart:
Just installed this cobbled up mess of a oiler on a cheap import x-y table.</font>

Looks like something you'd see in the wastebasket in a women's bathroom http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//eek.gif

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Leigh

J Tiers
03-22-2006, 11:55 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bpsbtoolman:
After having 2 newer South Bend lathes that had ball top oilers on the front of there saddles I decided that my older 9" South Bend needed them added to put oil between the wipers instead of just putting oil ahead or behind the wipers where it would do the most good. It seems reasonable if the wipers are working well most of the way oil put on outside the wipers is wiped off and never gets much between the wipers. </font>

The idea is great, I put 'em on a Logan and it works very well. I used cup oilers, because ball oilers get too dirty on top, and are hard or impossible to keep clean.


Top view.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub6.jpg

Bottom view of rear way oiler outlet. I scraped the little "ramp" so as to pull oil under the edge and not push it off
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub4.jpg


Bottom view of prior carriage very ugly but effective front way oiler outlet. I dunno what the red spot is, A reflection maybe.

New carriage is done far more cleanly.... more like the ramp on the rear view. On this, the center drill I thought would give a clean cone didn't.... the next one (not shown) I just scraped with a triangular scraper.

You can also on this one see what might happen if you DON'T get oil under there.... actually I think the PO let major swarf get under teh carriage. I have NO idea how he did that.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/CargLub3.jpg

A bit of felt fluff in the cup keeps the oiler from feeding in any crud that may somehow get into the cup.

It was interesting. I had cleaned the ways and the carriage well.

Even though they looked clean, for several days there way still black goo coming out in the oil from under the carriage as it moved. I'd wipe it of, and more would appear.

Now I never see that sort of goo. Just clean oil on the ways.

I put way wipers on the tailstock also, but with that it seems sufficient to get the wipers well soaked with oil. Then for at least a couple weeks the T/S is very smooth moving. When it seems a little less so, I give them all a couple drops again.



[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 03-22-2006).]

pcarpenter
03-22-2006, 12:07 PM
Jtiers-- Did you pull out ball oilers and replace them or is this "from scratch"? I would like to do the same on my Chicom lathe which currently has ball oilers which do seem like a way to end up with swarf under the carriage etc. I figure I will need to completely disassemble the ball oilers and drift them out from the backside unless someone knows of a safe removal method (drill and tap and pull?) from the top. I may do well to do that anyway to verify the presence of an oil distribution groove.

Do you have to install some sort of wick in the cup to prevent all the oil from just running through immediately? I guess if you treat the cup as just a point to apply oil (sort of like the ball oilers) instead of a reservoir to keep full, then it may not matter.
Paul

J Tiers
03-22-2006, 04:18 PM
I had to do all of it, there wasn't any oiler setup originally.

I've done two, because I swapped out the old-style Logan short carriage for a newer style one.

For the first one I put the oilers on the chuck side of the carriage. I decided that was too much in the way of crud and swinging parts. So for the second one I put them on the T/S side.

I think the chuck side worked slightly better for oiling, but the T/S side is far better for convenience. Any oil put under the carriage is far better than just whatever goes in under the wipers, so I'm not sweating the slight difference.

I put the felt fluff in there really just to keep swarf or grit from going down the hatch and causing damage. I don't think there is much oil storage capacity, and since the wick wouldn't go through the narrow part, I am not sure that would work. Not to mention that I didn't want any felt under the carriage.

I treat it basically as if it were a one-shot oiler. I dose it when starting work, and maybe again if I am doing a lot of carriage cranking. The cups and oil lines take quite a bit of oil to fill, possibly 10 drops.

I found that putting a tiny crease in the oiler cap helps, since otherwise there can be an air trap that prevents oil from going down if the cap seals too well on top of the oil pipe. It's hard to do that right, so it might be as well to just hold up the cap until it has mostly run in.

IIRC, I used about an 0.070 drill for the front oil passage. The top I drilled just enough deep and diameter wise to fit the oiler cap.
The back oil passage is mostly through the copper pipe, necessary on the Logan to get the oil to drop on the flat way without really fancy drilling. If you have dual V ways, the front and back can be the same.

[This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 03-22-2006).]

wierdscience
03-22-2006, 07:28 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by pcarpenter:

Wierdscience-- the system fitted on my Bridgeport mill is a Bijur L2P. It is spring loaded and provides oil on the spring-return stroke. These are designed to make oiling a no-brainer, but do make a mess. Oil running down the side of the mill does nothing for lubrication http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif The oiler feeds a manifold with 6? metering units. From there, there are maybe about 15 or so individual locationssurfaces that are fed oil by oil passages in the castings. Dovetail ways make it more complex since there end up being multiple points that oil has to be provided on each side of each sliding axis.

Good luck with your project!
Paul</font>

Uh,you do know that unlike a parachute rip cord you don't have to pull the handle all the way? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif