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Tuckerfan
12-15-2002, 03:33 PM
Anybody seen this stuff? http://www.business2.com/articles/mag/0,,43538,FF.html

Right now they're just using it for golf clubs, but it looks like it might have other uses as well, assuming they're not BSing about it and what it can do.

http://www.liquidmetalgolf.com/technology/

I've seen comments on other messageboards which seem to indicate that this isn't as good as what the company makes it out to be, but the opinion's generally mixed. Wonder how hard it would be to whip up a batch on my own?

Forrest Addy
12-15-2002, 04:11 PM
Every golfer is an idiot if you go by the golf equipment ads. As long as golfers persist in a game designed to frustrate its participants they will buy gimmicky equipment before they'll work to improve their skills. In this respect golfers, fishemen, horse players, and once beautiful women are all alike - they'd rather chase rainbows rather than face facts. Success is the product of hard work, self knowledge, and sensible sacrifice.

"Liquid Metal" golf clubs? It's another gimming whose main effect is placebo unless proved otherwise in double blind tests.

docsteve66
12-15-2002, 08:56 PM
Forrest http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif you don't play golf either I guess. Me? - I never hit a golf ball, bowled a line plus lots more. but I do love fishing, hunting- just have not done either in near 40 years.
Steve

Rustybolt
12-15-2002, 09:18 PM
Yep. when the goin gets tough.

The tough get goin!

Myself. I break out the fly rods and go fishin.
I see no reason to beat up a little ball that has never done anything to me.

jfsmith
12-15-2002, 09:40 PM
A few years ago, a bicycle company came out with some alloy that they called "allmet".
It was suppose to stonger than titanium, lighter than titanium or aluminum Supposed to be hardener than HT'd carbon steel or one of the 440 alloys.
I asked them for a sample of the stuff and explained that I wanted to make a knife out of this stuff. They wouldn't send me a sample or sell me a chunk of it.
After repeatedly calling them, they said I would not have the tools to work with this stuff. I told them that I have diamond saws and diamond coated shapers. They still wouldn't sell me a piece of the stuff.
I went to a bicycle shop that I get my bikes from and asked them about the stuff. They said that they never heard of the stuff. Then I went to a pro bike shop where I can't even afford the down payment of these olympic class bikes, they told me it was just an alloy of titanium. Nothing really that new, just never used for bike frames before.
So the bike makers assume that bike rider were just as dumb as golfers.

Jerry

Thrud
12-15-2002, 09:57 PM
Tuckerfan:
I think that is the metal used in the sonar transducers for the attack subs. I have seen a speaker that uses a thin film of it to turn a pane of glass into a large speaker for "tone deaf" audiophiles (I mean walkmans). Other than that, I have no idea.

I have seen Muscle wires (NiTi alloy) that once heat formed can be deformed and returned to the original heat formed shape by an electric current. This material was also developed by or for the USN. Expensive stuff.

jfsmith
12-15-2002, 10:53 PM
My mistake, Almet is an aluminum alloy.

Jerry

Eutecticbob
12-15-2002, 11:26 PM
I can't say that I have heard of it... but I would not be surprised if it exsists. I have heard of Nitnol... that NiTi alloy Thrud refered to... I actualy have a kit robot that you can build with it (the NiTi alloy is used as a metal muscle).

I will keep my ears open and pass on anything that I learn around school. Especially now that my curiousity is peaked!

Ebob

Rich Carlstedt
12-15-2002, 11:34 PM
Seems to have a contradiction in the sales brochure...."twice as hard and four times as elastic as competing titanium drivers"
Hardness and Elasticity, are contrary characteristics in my book ????
Sort of like pudding, gets a hard skin over the good stuff !

Did you guys catch the article in the new Forbes, Dec 23,2002 issue. Page 284 on "Steely Dan" about a new spray coating that is put on steel at .0002 and makes it super strong also ( 2 times stronger).
Personally I don't know how you could spray coat .0002 ?? vacuum deposit , yes, but spray ?

Anyway, what is interesting is the words are almost the same for both companys!
For example they (Steeely Dan) also say the secret is in the matrix of the molecules forming a lattice on cooling but being frustrated and forming a perfect de-fect free structure to give them the strength.

FYI Berillium (sp?) is pretty strong stuff. I noticed that it is in the "golfclubs"
We usually don't look at it due to the hazard level, but it is pretty neat stuff.

To you old timers, remember when those electric depositors came out in the 50's? Can't think of the name, but it was going to revolutionize tooling because you zapped it with a carbon/carbide coating. Made HS steel a thing of the past..
Boy I wish I could remember the name ?

Eutecticbob
12-16-2002, 11:26 PM
Rich,

I can understand why there is the thought of contradiction... another way to think of it is like case hardening... or better yet Japanese swords... The Japanese sword is superior to other swords by the sheer nature of construction... yes, some would say that the iron ore used is superior... but they use a softer metal on the inside of the blade and a carbon outer that gives it its hardness.

I just think that the sales pitch is of course never going to admit to too many pitfalls of the material.

Eutecticbob
12-16-2002, 11:27 PM
Rich,

I can understand why there is the thought of contradiction... another way to think of it is like case hardening... or better yet Japanese swords... The Japanese sword is superior to other swords by the sheer nature of construction... yes, some would say that the iron ore used is superior... but they use a softer metal on the inside of the blade and a carbon outer that gives it its hardness.

I just think that the sales pitch is of course never going to admit to too many pitfalls of the material.

Thrud
12-16-2002, 11:59 PM
Eutecticbob:
You got that backwards bud, the super hard edge is backed by a softer steel, just as it is today. I have seena "dull" 500 year ould blade nearly take a mans hand off when he caught it from a two foot fall to the floor - it came out of the scabard. A sword was never withdrawn except to draw blood. (ironicly)

The reason the Japanese Sword steel is considered superior is it has the most homogenious structure of any steel known. It is generally considered to be a function of the numerous folding and welding of the metal. The ore and forge was blessed by a Zen master before construction started. The sword had the heart and soul of the swordsmith within (or so legend claims).

Eutecticbob
12-18-2002, 12:13 AM
Thrud,

I must have not been clear... you and I are on the same page... thanks for the clarification... I have a friend that has been Nihonto sharpening for 25 years now... lives in a suburb of Tokyo. I wish I had a way to download 8mm analog footage... would love to share what I have seen.

Yes... I can definitely say that the swords are sharp... I will also add that some swords are designed with the infamous hard wareing chisle shape... makes them last longer when they are used for cuting through bogu (armor).

Ebob

chief
12-18-2002, 04:12 AM
I have been known to produce a material with the same properties, especially after a night of beer and hot Italian sausage.

decoy91288
12-18-2002, 12:11 PM
One of the gun makers (Smith and Wesson) is making frames from an alloy of aluminum and scandium. Scandium is available in very small quantities from the former Soviet Union. Fortunately it only takes extremely small quanities to alloy properly. Their advertisements claim greater strength than steel and it certainly is much lighter.

------------------
Craig

Thrud
12-19-2002, 02:31 AM
Craig

Exactly. Very tough to machine too. Ain't Technology great? Some of the S&W guns are 7 shooters too. Titainium cylinders.

darryl
01-04-2003, 02:38 AM
This holiday season I have been trying to come up with an alloy of cashews, oranges, coffee, turkey, ham, chocolates, turnips, and brussels sprouts, but I didn't get anything useable, and I ended up just flushing the whole thing down the toilet. Nothing I could use for a golf club, or anything else either. What a waste. On the subject of golf, has anyone seen the Robin Williams video clip on the birth of golf? It's worth a look if you can find it.

[This message has been edited by darryl (edited 01-04-2003).]