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THOMASP
10-30-2005, 10:27 AM
I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO LEARN PRECISION MACHINING? THERE ARE NO TRADE SCHOOLS WHERE I LIVE THAT TEACH THAT TRADE ANYMORE. THE SCHOOLS THAT HAD THE PROGRAM IN PLACE, CANCELED IT SEVERAL YEARS AGO. I JUST WANT TO LEARN PRECISION MACHINING TO MAKE MY OWN PARTS WHEN I HAVE TO. AND SECOND, I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED, AND ENJOY WORKING WITH METAL BECAUSE MY GRANDFATHER WAS A MASTER MACHINIST FOR FORTY YEARS. I HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO LEARN PRECISION MACHINING. IF ANYONE OUT THERE WHO IS A PRECISION MACHINIST OR A TEACHER, THAT CAN GIVE ME SOME SORT OF GUIDE OR ADVICE, I WOULD APPRECIATE IT. THANK YOU.

JS
10-30-2005, 03:43 PM
move to Illinois or Indiana. They are always lookin for help around there.


While we have some manufacturing in Nebraska would not recomend moving here to make sh*ty wages and pay a fortune for schooling

smoke
10-30-2005, 08:16 PM
Apparently you don't have any trade schools or Jr colleges around your area. What area do you live in? In Michigan we have several trade or vocational centers that teach everything from horticulture to auto mechanics. If you graduated from high school some classes are offered for free. I believe there are online courses available but i'm not sure where to start looking. Look online for tech schools or technical training. Hope this helps some don't know where you live.
smoke

Paul Alciatore
10-31-2005, 02:23 AM
I guess I am self educated in the area. I have visited my local librarys most of my life and books on metal working have been of primary interest. Check it out.

I also have purchased several texts including Machine Shop Practics, V1 and V2. Good reads.

Another good source of information are the magazines published by our host, Village Press: Home Shop Machinist and Machinist Workshop. I often read the magazines cover to cover, not because I am interested in every project. Frankly, I haven't built a single one. But to learn as much about the authors' techniques as possible.

And this board and that other one have taught me as much or more than all the books and magazines put together. Go back to the first message and start reading.

Of course, there is no substitute for hands on experience. Just make some parts. Then read some more. Then make more parts. Then read ... etc. If you have a problem and need advice on something, ask here. It's like having all the experts in several countries at your call.

Paul A.

Harold_V
11-02-2005, 02:15 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Paul Alciatore:
I guess I am self educated in the area. I have visited my local librarys most of my life and books on metal working have been of primary interest. Check it out.

I also have purchased several texts including Machine Shop Practics, V1 and V2. Good reads.

Another good source of information are the magazines published by our host, Village Press: Home Shop Machinist and Machinist Workshop. I often read the magazines cover to cover, not because I am interested in every project. Frankly, I haven't built a single one. But to learn as much about the authors' techniques as possible.

And this board and that other one have taught me as much or more than all the books and magazines put together. Go back to the first message and start reading.

Of course, there is no substitute for hands on experience. Just make some parts. Then read some more. Then make more parts. Then read ... etc. If you have a problem and need advice on something, ask here. It's like having all the experts in several countries at your call.

Paul A. </font>


Or, you could check in with the Chaski board, where many of the readers hold those of us with years of experience in great contempt. Post anything of substance and the hackers crawl out of the woodwork, defending their "right" to reduce machining to "that's good enough", a philosophy I despise.

My advice is to learn to work to close tolerances, even when it doesn't matter. That way, when tough work comes along, you handle it in stride, and you get to the point, due to repetition, where you can work that way almost as fast as the guy that does hack work. Most importantly, you can show others your work and hold your head up proudly. Even when showing it to seasoned machinists. They aren't often fooled.

Do not rely on insert carbide tooling, especially as a substitute for learning to properly hand grind HSS tool bits. You will never be free until you can do that successfully. There is no substitute for skill and knowledge.

I've long felt that my work was a signature---it represents me, and what I am. I try to do the best job possible each time I turn on one of my machines. It served me well through years of machining for industry.

Harold

[This message has been edited by Harold_V (edited 11-02-2005).]

opua
11-02-2005, 04:07 PM
If you don't have the opportunity of working in the industry or alongside skilled tradesmen or attending classes of some kind then you are up against it. However there are other options to broaden you knowledge, there are a number of training video's advertized in HSM that can be useful for a beginner, I've seen the AGM lathe and mill courses and thought they were very informative, disregard the statement that they'll turn you into a skilled machinist in short order. Your own [developing] skill and a great deal of practise and exposure to various materials and problems will help along the path to becoming a competent amateur machinist. Don't be discouraged it's a great hobby and for a lot of us a livelihood too. I've found answers and advice from this board to be freely given and a worthwhile adjunct to HSM and other publications. No one is born knowing this stuff, learning it can take a lifetime. Good luck

Paul Z

Karl H
11-02-2005, 06:31 PM
THOMASP, Glad to see you have an interest in this trade/fun machining. My Grandfather was machinist/engineer/mechanic. I've had my DAD,a couple of Uncles(one that owned a job shop)and friends that enjoy this metal cutting adventure. I have a couple of VHS tapes just taking up space that I'll give you if Neil says it's okay. They are pretty basic but I'm offering. I say in the shop to the younger guys{If I didn't bleeed on it - it ain't no good} Be Careful -K-

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