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StephenK
04-07-2006, 12:11 PM
I was at my friends business today and he mentioned to me that he bought two mills at an auction in Richmond Va. One of his employees has a trailer that will carry 5000 lbs.

My question is? Is it feasable to move the two mills from Richmond Va. to Northern New Jersey on a trailer or should he rent a truck. I suggested to rent a truck. The mills are a Southbend and a Bridgeport.

How do some of you who have moved equipment feel about this besides dropping them off at your place.

pcarpenter
04-07-2006, 01:15 PM
Here's my experience with a Bridgeport series 1 variable speed mill (<2000 pounds).

I picked it up at a shop with a 50 ton overhead crane :-) Life was easy...back my 6k cap. utility trailer in and pick it up and move it over and set it on. I did pull the head off and put it in the covered bed of my truck and plastic wrapped and then canvas tarped the rest (canvas doesn't "flap" when wet like plastic does) since it was going to have to travel several hundred miles in the rain. The head was protected from any leakage this way and it also meant the center of gravity was lower. Flipping the head upside down is an option if you do not wish to detach it, but the spindle faces the sky and a rain storm would wreck your whole day.

Upon arrival at my shop, I had limited lifting capability (a shop crane with 1k# capacity at maximum extension). I used pry bars and walked it near the rear of the trailer with jacks under the trailer corners for support. I then reached in and lifted the ram and turret off as an assembly. I then lifted the knee and column off the trailer as a unit and pulled the trailer out from under it. This was probably a stretch for the engine crane. I set it on the floor and used pipe sections to roll it to a temporary resting place. I then removed the table and then the knee and found that I could then use the engine crane to lift all bits and take them outside for cleaning with a caustic type grease remover and pressure washer.

What may differ for you is that you may not want much disassembly for other reasons and so you just do what you have to do to make managable sized pieces. In my case, I stripped the whole mill entirely apart. I tend to be that way, wanting to know all about what I bought and to clean all the gritty swarf out of where it does not belong. The deeper I dug, the more I decided to do. Short of a complete rescraping (not really necessary), I will have completely rebuilt it.

Search the archives as I learned some of what I used from an old post here.

Good luck
Paul

Wirecutter
04-07-2006, 02:20 PM
I drove a Bridgeport series 1 from New Hampshire to Virginia using a rented truck. I preferred to use a covered truck. I'm not sure how comfortable I'd be with 5K lbs on a trailer behind my vehicle - that's a lot for any non-CDL vehicle I can think of.

As many others have said regarding safety, machine setup, moving the heavy stuff, and other procedures: What's the worst that can happen? Plan for that.

Nutter
04-07-2006, 07:27 PM
I drove a Bridgeport series 1 from New Hampshire to Virginia using a rented truck. I preferred to use a covered truck. I'm not sure how comfortable I'd be with 5K lbs on a trailer behind my vehicle - that's a lot for any non-CDL vehicle I can think of.


Hop over to Dodge.Com and take a look at the tow ratings for the Ram 2500. It's towinng capacity is 12,8000 lbs. The factory reciever hitch is rated for 10K lbs. This is your basic 3/4 ton truck that many people drive every day. You do not need a CDL to own or drive one. Max towed weight without a CDL varies by state. I belive that you need a CDL for a trailer licensed for more than 10K lbs where I live, unless you are towing an RV trailer and then the limit is what your truck is rated for. Most of the miles my pickup sees are with a camper in the bed and a Jeep on the trailer, CGVW is right around 14K or 15K - very legal without a CDL. Edit: I should note that my truck is rated for a CGVW 20K lbs, so I am well within the design envelope of the truck even at 15K lbs.

I've moved a vertical mill on my car trailer a few times. Once I hauled my horizontal mill and a turret lathe for a friend at the same time, probably about the same weight as a couple Bridgeport sized vertical mills. It's not a big deal if you have the right equipment and some experience with towing a trailer.

Here's some photos of a couple of my moves.
http://members.tcq.net/jnutter/GortonMastermill122/index.html
http://members.tcq.net/jnutter/bridgeport/


Here's another page about moving mills - not mine.

http://bridgeport.askmisterscience.com/bridgeport.htm

By the way, I do want to thank all the people who get worried and who worry others about moving equipment. You guys keep the prices on the big machines low for those of us that can move them :)

Wirecutter
04-07-2006, 08:21 PM
It's not a big deal if you have the right equipment and some experience with towing a trailer.

Yeah, neither of which I currently have. I do remember a scary experience towing an '81 Jetta on one of those tow dollies, using a Ford F250 as a tow vehicle. A pickup like that is pretty rear-end light, so braking was severely affected. I was a passenger in the truck, and I got a little nervous when the driver had to brake hard when someone pulled in front of him.



By the way, I do want to thank all the people who get worried and who worry others about moving equipment. You guys keep the prices on the big machines low for those of us that can move them :)


Umm hmm. Everyone loves a smarta$$. :D Wanna help me on my next move???

Wirecutter
04-07-2006, 08:24 PM
Hey Nutter -

I was looking at the pics of your equipment moves. I have to say that appears to be a pretty stout trailer. Is the camper on the truck used partially as ballast? I understand that some tow hitches try to transfer tow loads toward the front of the vehicle with extra linkage - is yours like that? If so, I'm sure it's a big improvement

Nutter
04-07-2006, 09:23 PM
That's my old truck and my old camper in the Bridgeport pictures. I pretty much kept that camper on the truck all Summer (same with my current truck and camper). I drive a Wrangler to work every day. The truck and camper are mainly for hauling my trail Jeeps around (one at a time) and camping when I'm out in the woods. No ballast is needed with a trailer. You position the load so you get about 10 to 15% tongue weight.

The trailer is a standard 7000 lb car hauler. It's got a pair of 3500 lb axles and brakes on all four tires. It's nothing fancy.

I have a weight equalizing hitch. It's also a three foot extension. I only use it when the 11.3' Lance slide in camper is in the bed of the truck. The weight equalizing hitch works great. I couldn't have the trailer ball be three feet behind the truck without it. It takes out all the sway and all the play and makes it feel like I'm not running an extension at all.

Thanks for taking that last bit in the humor which i intended it. This board could use more guys like you ;)

Mad Scientist
04-07-2006, 10:19 PM
For a long trip a truck might be an easier drive, however an open trailer would be easier to load and unload.
Being that these are top heavy machines be sure to "very securely tie" them in place also you might want to consider laying them down.

Here is a brief story along that line. A few years back before ENCO moved out west they had a branch store near me. The manager told me this tail. A couple guys came in and bought a mid size lathe and he fork lifted it into the back of their pickup and asked how they were going to tie it down. They said it is heavy enough it is not going to go anywhere. WRONG! Anyway they drove off and he went back into the store. About 15 minutes later one came back and asks if he could bring the forklift to the turn in the road at the end of the block and put the lathe back on the truck. Yes it slid off and was lying on the side of the road. :o

The lathe appeared to be OK as it had land on soft dirt plus it was also on top of the side of the truck, that it had ripped off which helped break its fall. :eek:

StephenK
04-07-2006, 10:24 PM
Thanks for the help. They are going to rent a truck to pick up the mills instead of using a trailer. There's to much invested to take a chance of anything happening.

W9RAN
04-08-2006, 12:12 PM
My machine tool moving story is here:
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v652/ranickel/Machine%20Tool%20Moving/

If you have the equipment and know-how to do it right, great. Otherwise I found the modest cost of having a fellow who has and does to be well worthwhile. Of course a well-equipped hobbyist like I used will be a lot less expensive than a professional rigger. But when you're talking about an expensive piece of equipment and think about the potential for mayhem, having the right tie-downs, load binders, and hauling capacity is worth considering. Once the stuff was in my shop, of course I resorted to "Egyptian Pyramid" type techniques (i.e. bar and pipe rollers!)

Bob

rockrat
04-08-2006, 02:53 PM
Since we are talking moving machines.... here's mine
http://www.homeshopmachinist.net/bbs/showthread.php?t=11147&highlight=van+norman

I borrow a trailer when I move a machine, but if I were going the distance your talking about, a rented truck might be a good investment.

rock-

Wirecutter
04-09-2006, 05:37 PM
No ballast is needed with a trailer. You position the load so you get about 10 to 15% tongue weight.

The trailer is a standard 7000 lb car hauler. It's got a pair of 3500 lb axles and brakes on all four tires. It's nothing fancy.

I have a weight equalizing hitch. It's also a three foot extension. I only use it when the 11.3' Lance slide in camper is in the bed of the truck. The weight equalizing hitch works great. I couldn't have the trailer ball be three feet behind the truck without it. It takes out all the sway and all the play and makes it feel like I'm not running an extension at all.


That sounds like a sweet setup. Sooner or later I have to either get myself one like that or befriend someone who has one. The problem I have is that I've no place to put such a thing.

In my dreams, I have one of those trucks used to haul pallets of cinderblock or drywall. Big thing with a stout cargo crane right behind the cab. Friend of mine bribed a guy to use a truck like that to move an engine (GM 454) from well inside a garage to a waiting trailer in the driveway. One lift - the crane could gooseneck all the way into the garage to snatch up the engine.

My biggest problem, aside from money, is that I like the convenience of city life, but my desired toys are better suited to country life. (Large spaces, huge work "barn", multiple vehicles) Either that, or I should take up residence in an industrial park. :D