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View Full Version : OT: I learned (and made up) some new words today



Wirecutter
04-22-2006, 08:04 PM
It was only a 2by6, but why did it have to land squarely on the toenail? Why did it have to take a direct path? How can such a small part of me radiate so much pain? It only fell off of a table, not a rooftop or something, and it's only a part of a 2by6 - only about 3' long. Ow. Can I say again? Ow. Well, I guess I figured out how to fix that unsightly toenail problem. Only 9 more to go.

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/wires99/big_toe_sm.jpg

It wasn't even really metalworking related, yet SWMBO wants to ban me from the shop for a month.

Well, I guess I'll switch over to working on a welder controller for my battery-tab welder project.

Oh, note the absence of my usual signature. Seems inappropriate. I'm off to get some alcohol...

panchula
04-22-2006, 08:46 PM
I did that to my left big toe once. It was a two foot aluminum level from about 3 feet (very low ballistic coefficient). The corner of it went right through the base of the nail -- which was a *good thing* as I didn't have to lance through the nail to relieve the pressure. Just a quick pause to bandage the perforated digit and back to hanging shelves.

One of my more vivid memories of my childhood was watching my Dad build shelves in the basement. Dad lined up the 16p nail and tap, tap, WHAM! He didn't swear at all when he annihilated his left thumbnail. He just dropped the hammer, bent over with his hands between his knees and sucked air. It hurt too bad to swear! I was an eight year old in awe. When the nail grew back it was twice as thick as the one on his right thumb.

-Mike

Tin Falcon
04-22-2006, 09:12 PM
Yes that must have hurt that is why I like wearing steel toed shoes. I think we have all had our share of shop mishaps. I accidently trimed my fingernail with a router a few years back. Thank Godfo good reflexes. The worse one I did was setting the pants on fire with the cutting torch.
Tin

Almack
04-22-2006, 09:34 PM
I was going to compliment you on the color of your nail polish, then I read your tale of misfortune.
:(

IOWOLF
04-23-2006, 08:22 AM
Ummm, Steel toed boots.

And, you have nice looking toes.:rolleyes:

NiftyNev
04-23-2006, 08:33 AM
My toes are extra sensitive. I only have to think about dropping something on them and it hurts.

Nev

rockrat
04-23-2006, 09:01 AM
Yup, the one day I was in a hurry to get out of work, I already had my shoes changed and jumped on my little electric scooter to get to the front door. I had a 4" round of hrs in the basket that was not firmly attached. I punched the go button and the hrs went onto my foot. I limped for 2 weeks. Got the nickname "gimpy" out of that one.

rock-

Evan
04-23-2006, 09:05 AM
A few years ago I was starting up the basement steps from the shop and I didn't place my foot just right on the bottom step. I had taken my swarf covered shoes off. I caught all my weight on just the left big toe. It didn't hold and I felt a sharp pain and nearly fell. I must have cracked a bone in it because it bothered me for a long time after that. If I walked on it for long it would start to hurt.

A year or so later I was working in the shop handling a 3' long piece of heavy aluminum tubing. I had oily hands and lost my grip on the part. It fell directly, you guessed it, on my left big toe.

Oddly, it didn't hurt. Not only that, ever since that happened the toe no longer bothers me. Whatever it did it somehow fixed the problem from the stair incident. However, if a doctor had said to me "Sure we can fix your toe, let me find my hammer..." I would have been outta there.

lynnl
04-23-2006, 02:35 PM
I agree with Wolf. Those are the nicest looking toes I ever saw on a grown man. ...'cept that big one of course! :D

I only have six toenails left. I started, 7 or 8 yrs ago, just having them removed anytime one becomes ingrown. Wish I'd done that earlier in life. After a year or so the toe seems to get tougher and less pain-sensitive than with the nail on. I highly recommend that to anyone with toenail problems.

john hobdeclipe
04-23-2006, 03:50 PM
3/4" particle board, 4' X 8' sheet on edge. Hyper Idiot at the other end jerked it out of my hands, off the stack and onto my toe. I wonder if the words I made up sounded anything like the ones you made up?

Alistair Hosie
04-23-2006, 04:50 PM
And, you have nice looking toes.


Be careful I see a few feet fetishists(:D gotta be careful how you say that) still whatever turns you on for a big guy I too have pretty feet:DAlistair

Scishopguy
04-23-2006, 08:12 PM
#&%@!!! THAT HURTS TO LOOK AT! Yep, I bet it will turn lots more pretty colors before it stops hurting. When I missed the nail I was driving and "nailed" the thumb nail that was next to it I discovered that the pressure from the blood trapped beneath it was what was causing most of the pain. My boss, an old retired navy metalsmith, told me to get a small drill in a pin vise and CAREFULLY drill, by hand, through the nail. That allowed the blood blister to drain and nearly all the pain left instantly. Sounds creepy but it works.

Jim (KB4IVH)

motorcyclemac
04-24-2006, 07:04 AM
#&%@!!!
When I missed the nail I was driving and "nailed" the thumb nail that was next to it I discovered that the pressure from the blood trapped beneath it was what was causing most of the pain. CAREFULLY drill, by hand, through the nail. That allowed the blood blister to drain and nearly all the pain left instantly. Sounds creepy but it works.

Jim (KB4IVH)


Another method for that same result is to use a sharpened piece of stainless TIG rod heated with an oxy acetylene torch till red hot...then place the tip of the hot stainless rod on the offending nail. Nail is simply thick hair and will burn quite well when touched with hot metal. The addition of lots of heat will expidite the forming of the vent hole in the nail. Yes it smokes....done it several times. Works wonders. Just be careful as to not poke too far into the nail bed...lest you make up new more wonderful words....ending in ucker and itch....

cheers
-Bill

J Tiers
04-24-2006, 09:21 AM
Hmmm

That toe looks similarly grumpy to ones that catch on the inside of the shoe during a soccer game (football to Alistair, JS, etc) and get the nail ripped out before any opportunity to fix shoes comes up.

It takes about 8 - 10 weeks to get reasonably normal after that........ probably yours is the same. Less if the nail does not fall out.

If you break your toe, apparently the doc looks at it and says "yep, that's broken" and sends you on your way..... At least that is what they have done for co-workers. Nice.

Wirecutter
04-24-2006, 10:32 AM
I only have six toenails left. I started, 7 or 8 yrs ago, just having them removed anytime one becomes ingrown. Wish I'd done that earlier in life. After a year or so the toe seems to get tougher and less pain-sensitive than with the nail on. I highly recommend that to anyone with toenail problems.

What an interesting idea. No more trimming with wire cutters, no more toe jam, etc. It sounds like it might also hurt like hell. Do you have to get a waiver from Amnesty International or the UN?

mayfieldtm
04-24-2006, 10:38 AM
And the Fun part!
In a few days you'll be able to peel that toe-nail back and pull it off.

If you didn't know...

Sometimes when a toe or finger nail gets smashed, you can use a red not needle and melt a hole through the nail into the that black and blue area.
This will allow the blood to escape and relive most of the pain.

Reminds me of the time when my loving big brother busted his guts laughing after shocking the hell out of me with a magneto. So... I pushed a sledge hammer off the bench onto his Big Toe.
Now, that was funny!

Tom M.

Alguy
04-24-2006, 04:54 PM
Ouch it hurts looking at it, Just a reminder to those who play with table saws watch those digits . just got done talking to guy next door he was finishing up his last cut , ripping a board and he cut the end of his thumb off between the joint and nail. He did it this past week end and has a trip to the surgeon to fix it so it will heal ok , they did not reattach it because it was shredded to much to fix.
allen

lynnl
04-24-2006, 05:14 PM
In response to Wirecutter (above): No, surprisingly there's very little pain, other than (briefly) the shot to numb it. Then there's no pain at all while he cuts it off.

The worst part of it is the aggravation of caring for it for a few weeks afterward. The Dr. applies some medication to prevent it from growing back, so you aren't permitted to get it wet for about (I think) 48 hours. Then you have to keep it bandaged good for a couple of weeks. It kinda oozes blood. Then as it starts healing you're supposed to wash it aggressively.

For a few weeks there is some mild tenderness of course, but not what you'd really call 'pain'. You hardly notice it wearing shoes. Then after 3 or 4 months it's as tough as ever.

Sure beats the hell outta ingrown nails!

Wirecutter
04-24-2006, 07:49 PM
And the Fun part!
In a few days you'll be able to peel that toe-nail back and pull it off.

If you didn't know...

Sometimes when a toe or finger nail gets smashed, you can use a red not needle and melt a hole through the nail into the that black and blue area.
This will allow the blood to escape and relive most of the pain.

Tom M.

Oh, yeah, I'm aware of the need for a pressure-relief hole. If I wasn't nearly in tears, it might have been funny to watch me hop around the shop, locate the Dremel, and carefully mill a thin spot so I could make the needed hole. (I have very thick nails) I was kinda frantic looking for suitable tools for the "operation". Turned out the Dremel was the choice for prepping the area with the least amount of downward pressure on the nail.

And regarding the table saw: I've always been extremely wary of them. I have two - one with a carbide-tipped blade for cutting wood and aluminum, and the other with an abrasive blade for cutting metal. I once glanced a knuckle against the one with the abrasive, earning a rather unpleasant burn. Of course, had it been the other blade, I'd be missing a digit. The carbide-tipped blade is probably the most respected tool in the shop with regards to safety. No other tool in my shop has the same capacity for death and dismemberment.

Of course, it seems like all of my worst injuries are from the so-called "safe" items. I really never suspected that block of wood until it was too late. Another painful lesson.

lynnl, thanks for the info. I think I'll be looking into that option, since I also have "problem nails" inherited from my father. Perhaps this could be a convenient time to "retire" that nail with the medication you mentioned that prevents grow-back. Calling the podiatrist tomorrow...

-M

Wirecutter
04-24-2006, 07:57 PM
Oh yeah. The day after the toe incident, SWMBO came home with this and demanded it be installed in the shop:


http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i106/wires99/FA_kit.jpg


-M