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View Full Version : Interesting Show on TV, don't know if its new



cuemaker
04-27-2006, 10:20 AM
But its called "How Things are Made". I watched 2 episodes last nite. I saw how molds are made for plastic injection, bikes, eye protection glasses, oil filters.. etc.

Not an in depth look by any means, but interesting.

tattoomike68
04-27-2006, 01:29 PM
I have seen some of them , the one where they make nuts and bolts was realy good.

Evan
04-27-2006, 01:50 PM
Yeah, that's a good show. They even showed how sausage is made one time. :eek:

cruzinonline
04-27-2006, 01:58 PM
I'm dating myself here, but there used to be a show I think on PBS called "Connections" (I think) and they would take something in history and connect it to today, like one I remember was Gunpowder produced cannons which changed castles which led to surveying equipment (for lining up and firing the cannons) which led to mapmaking of countries which led to a central beacon in England as a center point which used limelight but by the time it was constructed the had discovered arc light .................eventually up to television. Kind of neat. They even had a show that traced the origins of computers from rug making.

IOWOLF
04-27-2006, 02:09 PM
Connections, Yep I remember it,Good show.

BTW Cuemaker,Where you been?

John R
04-27-2006, 02:12 PM
sounds good...what network and time?

Evan
04-27-2006, 02:22 PM
That is also a good show (Connections, by James Burke) but sometime the "connections" are a bit of a stretch. Even though it may seem logical that a particular device/method etc. was a logical forerunner of something else there isn't really much of a connection.

In the case of computers the real connection was the invention of programmable looms. The main thing about the programmable loom was that the programming could be changed at will. It wasn't a computer since it didn't have the capability to change it's own programming but it was the first use of a manufacturing device that could have it's operations changed by following coded instructions.

Making carpets wasn't the real impetus for this development, complex fabric patterns were.

DICKEYBIRD
04-27-2006, 03:36 PM
How It's Made is a great show indeed. I find myself wanting longer segments that explain things in more detail. Especially when they show things being made out of metal!:)

The one on bicycles was very interesting. It showed the steel frame tubing being cut to length with a parting tool, stock held with a collet and then "fish-mouthed" before being bent on a CNC bender. The tubes were placed into a jig and brazed together. They just dropped a measured chunk of the brazing material down the tube and then some torches fired up to heat the whole joint up 'til it was bright red. The braze joint flowed out beautifully and they let it air cool. After the frame was completely brazed together, they put it into another jig and tweaked out by hand any warpage caused by the heating/brazing process.

They showed the whole wheel spoking process, tire/tube mounting, powder coating the frame, controls assembly, etc, etc. Amazing how much hand work goes into a bicycle!

cruzinonline
04-27-2006, 03:42 PM
The original Connections was much better than the sequal. The punch cards on the loom (which controlled pins, which selected threads) was used on a device for immigration so that all kind of records could be kept. I was in India last year, and of course had to buy some carpets and got to see hand made stuff but the interesting shops were still using looms with cards. Some of the cards or patterns had to be over a hundred years old. Not sure how old the cards were, but many of them were made of wood and definitely had some age on them.

Rustybolt
04-27-2006, 04:17 PM
The original Connections was much better than the sequal. The punch cards on the loom (which controlled pins, which selected threads) was used on a device for immigration so that all kind of records could be kept. I was in India last year, and of course had to buy some carpets and got to see hand made stuff but the interesting shops were still using looms with cards. Some of the cards or patterns had to be over a hundred years old. Not sure how old the cards were, but many of them were made of wood and definitely had some age on them.


Called a Jaquard Loom, after the man who invented it.

bpsbtoolman
04-27-2006, 05:50 PM
I wonder if they ever put the original connections on a tape or DVD. They were great and worth seeing again. A programed loom was and probably still is in the Henery Ford Museum in Dearborn , Michigan. The machine shops, museum, and a lot of great stuff is there. A day to see the village and another to see the mesuem is needed it is so large.
Walt

Evan
04-27-2006, 06:10 PM
On one episode of How It is Made they showed metal spinning. They showed a CNC spinning lathe and that was neat but the best part was when they showed an old spinning hand who must have been making lamp reflectors for a couple of hundred years. He would take a big disc of aluminum and slap it on the lathe and in about 30 seconds, presto! another reflector. I know if I tried to copy what he did there would be another UFO zinging across the shop like Odd Job's hat. I suspect even a good CNC couldn't turn out more work than he did.

glenj
04-27-2006, 06:20 PM
How It's Made is a great show indeed..(snip)..They showed the whole wheel spoking process, tire/tube mounting, powder coating the frame, controls assembly, etc, etc. Amazing how much hand work goes into a bicycle!

I saw that episode as well. Those are the really low end bikes that sell at "Canadian Tire" etc. The thin walled tubing used in quality bikes would not withstand the abuse that brazing method puts the tubes through.

I've been building custom frames a a hobby for 8 years and just started a blog on the subject.

http://back40bicycleworks.blogspot.com/

Not going into too much detail yet, just documenting the process right now.

cruzinonline
04-27-2006, 06:23 PM
The loom is still in the Ford Museum, a must see site for any gear head. Has anyone seen a "show" on How in the heck did somebody make the "FIRST" thread??? Handmade? I know you can make almost any part on a lathe but how did they make the parts for the "First" lathe. Bet hand filing that lead screw was interesting. Oh by the way, I was boring out a compressor housing in Florida awhile back and asked what the tolerance was on the about 60" diameter and the guy told me within .001". This was with a portable machine by the way. I asked him if he knew what a .oo1" was. He walked off and came back with a drill bit grinder he had made. The largest drill it would handle was .007". They used needle stock for the drill bits. The feed on the handle was .001" for every 10 revolutions. The "feed nut" was leather so that the "accuracy" of the feed screw was averaged over the length of the nut. I was humbled. The drills were for drilling plates for a carpet thread extruder. BTW did you know that carpet thread is not round but is Y shaped. It makes it feel softer? And I get paid to learn this stuff.

Furnace
04-27-2006, 07:00 PM
Thats an awesome show, I think it started on Discovery Science and they moved it to the Discovery channel. They had how screwdrivers were made yesterday. I never knew that contact lenses are made with a small lathe, from little chunks of.... hell, I cant remember. About time they had good shows like that instead of all the reality show/spoiled ass whiney actors show.

irontoart
04-27-2006, 08:41 PM
I saw the show where they were making end mills. I believe it was filmed at International Minicut in Quebec Canada. Then there was the one on glass eyes. Incredible the amount of work to make those.

PTSideshow
04-27-2006, 09:52 PM
They have the episodes numbered on our cable info guide. all of the companies are in Canada. More so in Quebec they made signs in French tonight. Dirty jobs is another one that is good for some heavy duty machines. The foundry job of making shower drains was a good one. showed the whole production line as he atemped to make a brass drain. The is another one on the Travel channel with the post man from the bar show. He travels accross the USA to various locations to different companies like fender and harley and a limestone quarry. can't remember the name of it. Having a senior moment or brain fart :D :D

halac
04-27-2006, 10:11 PM
The is another one on the Travel channel with the post man from the bar show. He travels accross the USA to various locations to different companies like fender and harley and a limestone quarry. can't remember the name of it. Having a senior moment or brain fart :D :D
http://i.imdb.com/f9.gif John Ratzenberger played Cliff Claven on Cheers. The show he hosts now is called "Made in America".

Alguy
04-28-2006, 09:46 AM
I enjoyed the Connections series by James Burke and i agree the first series was much better. We were once honered by Mr burke when he came to our little town on speaking tour he was very interesting I enjoyed the lecture as much as the original series. He is very interesting person.

cruzinonline
04-28-2006, 11:48 AM
So how did they make the first thread????

Evan
04-28-2006, 11:50 AM
A file. Of course that begs the question of how did they make the first file so they could file the chisel to make the file.

Furnace
04-28-2006, 07:10 PM
Right now theyre making ball bearings.

Scishopguy
04-28-2006, 07:21 PM
Great show!!! It is on Discovery channel at 6:00pm Eastern Daylight time. I am watching it right now, as a matter of fact. This one is about the process making soda cans, making gummy worms, and making bronze sculpture. This stuff is just plain interesting. I am always seeing something on there that I wasn't aware of.

Jim (KB4IVH)

See Johnny, learning is fun!!!

Furnace
04-29-2006, 01:37 AM
Man that episode was supposed to have ball bearings being made on it, screw gummy worms.

SJorgensen
04-29-2006, 01:53 AM
We must all be of like minds. I've been TiVoing that series. I liked the vacuum forming of spa tubs and the manufacture of florescent tubes.

I often think of how many people can be put out of a job by a new machine.