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A.K. Boomer
05-09-2006, 01:24 AM
whats the cut off point, i mean i like to go down in the ole basement with a couple of breckenridge trademarks and its a blast milling, but when is enough enough, numbers get mixed up for me after three or four and thats not good, i dont have any dummy marks on my table yet but my machine is still fairly new, i mean what if the girlfriend comes down in the basement at 3 in the morning and pink floyd is jammin loud enough to wake up the niebors and crap and she says hunny when you coming to bed and you say i'll be right up in about fifteen minutes but you know in your heart its going to be allot longer, allot longer......... when do you guys call it quits, whats the cut off point?

torker
05-09-2006, 01:29 AM
This should be good!

abn
05-09-2006, 01:38 AM
Drinks, girls, Floyd, 3am, and machinery. And you're asking when to call it quits??? I'm getting old, but that still sounds like just a beginning to me!! :):):):)

Arbo
05-09-2006, 07:48 AM
In all seriousness, nobody enjoys a cold lager more than me. I sometimes will indulge in a few while working in the shop, but never enough to cloud my judgement in any way. The machines are way too dangerous to not have my senses about me. I still have all of my fingers, and would like to keep them. Safety is a big concern for me!

John Stevenson
05-09-2006, 08:09 AM
If it's that Yankee fizzy 'beer', don't worry it's not alcoholic, it's just like fizzy water.
Worry more about your hearing.

.

topct
05-09-2006, 08:34 AM
I suppose some people could and can do it. I cannot. So I do not.

I do have a microphone stuffed into one of my accordians though, and that plugged into a hundred watt Fender tube amp is very dangerous. I have had people tell me that I was killing them. :D

SGW
05-09-2006, 08:56 AM
IMO alcohol, in any amount, has no place in a shop.

As far as when to quit working, in general, I find that if I go too long I start to screw up, so it tends to be automatically self-limiting. Two hours of concentrated high-precision effort is about my limit. If it's more general, less concentrated, kinds of work then I can go longer.

bob_s
05-09-2006, 09:11 AM
IMO alcohol, in any amount, has no place in a shop.

Now just hold on there, it makes a wonderful coolant for cutting aluminium!

-bob

thistle
05-09-2006, 09:34 AM
Now just hold on there, it makes a wonderful coolant for cutting aluminium!

-bob
before or after it has been consumed?
I should imagine it would be fairly dangerous to get the
coolant applicator too close to the work piece.

seriously -beer is for when all the tools are shut down,and the floor
(if you own one) has been swept up, its Guinness for me thank you.

A.K. Boomer
05-09-2006, 10:41 AM
I try not to make a habit out of it cuz then its like the word machining makes you think of beer and thats not good, and precision work needs intence focus, and lathe work is in my opinion a little more dangerous than most milling procedures, i guess either one can throw a hefty chunk of metal at you but the difference being with a lathe is its going to have the spin factor along with the impact, and then theres the way that dang chuck looks when your holding something big and the jaws are hanging way the hell out like those ben hur spikes on one of those chariot things that the romans used to use to kill people with, yeah i dont have to many when messing with a lathe...

pcarpenter
05-09-2006, 11:01 AM
Any of you guys who are professional machinists think your boss would let you "have one" while operating a machine?

Numbers getting difficult to deal with???? You are well past unsafe with rotating machinery before that point. If you can't think quickly enough to add numbers, you can't think quickly enough to deal with rotating parts or cutters IMHO.

I like beer that even our friends across the pond would like (not the typical watered down pilsner)...but I am not much on drinking it warm as is the case over there sometimes. Still, I am not interested in consuming more than one while trying to stay sharp. We keep our cutters sharp...why would we dull our brains. I also don't like music up loud....I want to hear the machine and the work.

Your ability to determine when your abilities are impared is impared when you drink:D I don't think it is worth finding out how many is one too many. Granted, here you will not likely kill someone else in the process as with driving impared, but you will have a harder time enjoying your hobby missing fingers or a hand or arm or eye. Is beer worth that?

The issue of knowing when to quit to keep the important people in our lives happy is another issue. As men, we generally tend by nature to be a little Excessive Repulsive...er...uh...Obsessive Compulsive. If working in the shop is fun, working in the shop a lot is a lot of fun;) However, too much of a good thing can lead to the loss of other good things.

I am married,divorced, and remarried. The first was a mistake on many levels, but I would never want to risk loosing my wife to make metal shavings. Renee happens to be *very* patient and supportive, and in turn, I go out of my way not to take advantage of it. Remember, you can't come back out to the shop until you come in from the shop:)

Paul

Samuel
05-09-2006, 12:00 PM
every once in a while, after the day is done, and the machines are unpluged, I will get a cold one and sweep up a bit.
Tools are dangerous, so is driving to the E.R. with one arm and a blood alcohol level thats over over .08 .

Samuel

IOWOLF
05-09-2006, 12:30 PM
"IMO alcohol, in any amount, has no place in a shop."

I agree with SGW and feel strongly about it.

J Tiers
05-09-2006, 12:59 PM
My rule is no machines get turned on after beer (actually usually ale, I don't care for horse piss fizz beer, personally).... I can sweep up, clean up, plan work, surf the web, whatever, but no machining. Sure cuts down on my drinking.... I think I have about two a month.... must be because I hate cleaning....

my neighbor has a "fizz beer" as soon as he hits the house after work. Then he has a few more in the course of the evening. He has one or two while mowing the lawn.......etc, etc. Frankly, the man has a drinking problem.... although he is never quite drunk, and never drinks at work, etc.

I have a rule for him, too. I don't lend out power tools.... not after seeing him trim the end of his finger with a hedge trimmer......

BTW:
J.S. is perfectly correct about US (and Canadian, for that matter) "beer".... there oughtta be a law..... lots is thin, watery, and tastes skunky..... that would be the local product, Anheuser-Busch. "Beer" is brewed in Germany and the Czhech republic..... try "Golden Pheasant" someday..... or what you get in on tap in a smaller German town. ("export" beer does not count)

Cecil Walker
05-09-2006, 01:12 PM
I also am in total agreement with IOWOLF and SGW. Over the past 59 years i have grown very accustomed to my fingers, eyes, ears, and in fact all my body parts, ( although some aren't used quite as frequently as they once were). Don't think life would be the same without them. Of course that's just my opinion.

Scishopguy
05-09-2006, 04:27 PM
I love my beer (and dark rum too) and I love machining. But they are two discrete and seperate activities. I make enough stupid errors on my own without getting all fuzzy and lopsided. When doing precise work involving calculations it gets really expensive if you're drinking. I would rather have a beer or get a big rum and coke after I am done.

Jim (KB4IVH)

JRouche
05-09-2006, 04:46 PM
Not a good idea to operate machines (cars are machines too, actually blenders are too) while under the influence. Under the influence includes alcohol, pot, recreational drugs and prescription drugs which alter yer mental and physical state. Just not a good idea...Now, a couch isnt really a machine so....JRouche

IOWOLF
05-09-2006, 04:53 PM
JR , Is a remote control?

Rustybolt
05-09-2006, 05:03 PM
Yep. Adult beverages are for after the machines are turned off. I've met more guys named 'lefty' who had to prove a point after a few cold ones. Shoe up sober, work sober, punch out sober. After that your times your own. Besides. I hate cleaning blood off of machines.

IOWOLF
05-09-2006, 05:05 PM
So, in fact it was not a very smart question to propose here.IMHO

CCWKen
05-09-2006, 05:12 PM
Safety first, fun second. You'll have to be your own judge of what's right and what's not. I know some folks that can have 4ozs. of wine and be stumbling drunk and others that can go through a six-pack and still thread a needle. I personally am all business in the shop and need all the faculties I can get. If I'm tinkering and not using machinery (cleaning, adjusting, etc.), I'll sometimes have a cool one on a hot day or evening. Forget trying to paint a car after a few brews. It may look good at the time but the next morning usually reveals a lot of rework time.

I generally don't have to keep my schedule in time with anyone else but I rarely go past midnight in the shop. I'm better in the morning anyway and would rather hit the shop at 4-5am. It's cooler for one thing. Your environment sounds different and you'll have to respect the schedules of those around you.

It's too dang hot out now and that's why I'm here. Having a cool one too. :D

TECHSHOP
05-09-2006, 05:18 PM
Alcohol limits you to admiration of the cast iron.

Fasttrack
05-09-2006, 05:30 PM
I'll have to throw my lot in with Iowolf and SGW. PCarpenter also made a very good point. Now admittedly i'm underage and therefore don't drink period, but after having a father who had a problem with alcohol (not precisely a drunk - never lost his job or etc) i will never drink period. Drinking in the shop though - i don't see how anyone would consider this ok. I've seen the wood work my dad has done and what he is like; the work is always sloppy and usually full of mistakes and he is pissy when it doesn't turn out right. I say no alcohol until everything's off and the day is done - but then its your choice. As long as you can't hurt anyone but yourself then you have the right to do as you think. Just absolutely do not drive!!!

gundog
05-09-2006, 06:09 PM
Alcohol has no place in my shop I really get PO"d when a drop of it spills in the floor. Lightnup I am just kidding a beer or two but after that who wants to work anyway.
GD

mochinist
05-09-2006, 07:44 PM
So, in fact it was not a very smart question to propose here.IMHO:rolleyes:Yes maybe he should have posted a political message instead, those always go over well huh Iowolf.



Back to the topic, alcohol has no place in the shop if you are running or are around any running machines. I take clients to lunch sometimes, and will have a beer with my sandwich, but I have the luxury of going back to the shop and doing some quotes in the office where I am nice and safe.

Tin Falcon
05-09-2006, 07:51 PM
the only use alchcohol has in the shop is as a cleaning solvent or may bee as a cooling agent of a home brew cutting fluid.
Tin

charlie coghill
05-09-2006, 08:18 PM
I don't have a problem with alcohol in the shop as long as it is not my shop and I am not in the shop where it is.

HTRN
05-09-2006, 08:36 PM
Any of you guys who are professional machinists think your boss would let you "have one" while operating a machine?

I had one boss that used to send me on beer runs.:D


HTRN

BillH
05-09-2006, 08:48 PM
When to call it quits, I wouldnt drink even one. Im a big buy and have had 1 beer knock me out so bad that I shouldnt of been driving. Theres a valve, and when it opens up, even with 1 beer, watch out.

A.K. Boomer
05-09-2006, 09:24 PM
WOW what a great topic, look at all the replys, many people feel very strongly about this and i think everybody has the right to do what they want as long as its in their own private shop, I would never get high and get on my machine but thats just because the way i am when im high would not be safe at all, to me a little beer aint bad as long as i watch my step, i think machining while your in a crazy mood can get you in trouble also and for me getting off of heavy equipment (i run trenchers and backhoe's and stuff part time) and then jumping on my mill is not a good move --- two totally different worlds, I also help a local friend out once in awhile on his super presicion harding chucker and sharp cnc mill, i would never even have a half beer and get on any of his machines As far as the risk goes im prepared to take a little chance with it, Im a class 4 white water kayaker, i raced Mt. bikes all over the state of colorado, iv had my F1 CBR 600 up to 156mph for miles before lifting off the throttle with nuthing more than a t-shirt shorts and no shoes! many many times, redline was 12,000 rpms and 156 was 12,500 in sixth gear, im glad i sold that thing, I think kayaking is one of the most dangerous sports iv ever done, had a friend who was class 5 and lost 17 paddeling buddies over the years to the river, thats why i stayed at class 4, i lost a brother in the yellowstone,,,, anyways its not that i dont respect machinery because i do, and the last thing i want to do is turn into a gimp and have to get my butt wiped by some gal named Olga for another 50 years, but you have to weigh that out with this senario, take great care of yourself do everything right and odds are you'll live long enough to make it to the nursing home only to be writing your name with your own poop on some wall and the clencher is you'll be spelling it wrong,
worse yet make it all the way to the bitter end only to realize you forgot to live a life, so i leave you with this,,,have fun and be safe, drink responsibly, i would feel very safe half lit and doing a 1inch frame with a little 3/32 ball end mill (making sure i wasnt wearing long sleaves of course) at the same time one beer and running a lathe is a no no for certain proceedures (for me anyways) remember --- all across america people are drinking margaritas and mixing them with machinery, ya just hope to god nobody wigs out and sticks their hand into the blades.... better safe than sorry without being sorry youv played the game to safe, what a wonderful balance life is ehh?

BillH
05-09-2006, 09:53 PM
Life is short, thats why when I go down to Florida for ATC, I will also be getting my pilots license. I'll get to pay uncle same back for that one.
Life is too short to not do the things you always wanted, too short to be alone, too short to be bored.

john hobdeclipe
05-09-2006, 10:16 PM
I love my wine and I love my ale (A good Belgian, Chimay or Maredsous, not the lightly carbonated pig piss that passes for beer here in the US) and I look forward to relaxing AFTER a long day and getting a bit buzzy headed before I head for the bed. But NEVER during the day when I have to work or drive.

As a foolish youth, I worked in a furniture factory by day and partied by night. One Saturday morning I came into work still quite a bit unsteady from the night's carousing. I was operating a machine called a "Bell 424" which is a combination double ended compound miter trim, bore, glue and dowel machine. Not a toy, but a production machine with 16" saw blades and lots of horsepower to spin them. It would take too long to describe exactly what happened, but due to my heavily impaired mental state, I nearly mitered, bored, glued and dowelled my left arm up around the elbow. Fortunately I didn't get hurt at all, but when I saw what I nearly did, I shut the thing off, turned around and told the boss I was going home before I got hurt.

I spent many more years in all facets of furniture manufacturing, quite sober all the way, and still have all my extremities. But I've seen some stupid things happen just because of diminished alertness. It ain't worth it!

EDMTech
05-09-2006, 10:28 PM
A lot of people here mention they like to drink before bed.

I'd like to remind you: Don't drink and park. Accidents cause people.

This has been a public service message :D

EDMTech
05-09-2006, 10:30 PM
Joking aside, drinking at the shop has to be fairly limited as my shop is about 5 miles from my house, and the local police seem to hate me enough already. It's ok though, I hate them too.

jkeyser14
05-09-2006, 11:15 PM
WOW what a great topic, look at all the replys, many people feel very strongly about this and i think everybody has the right to do what they want as long as its in their own private shop, I would never get high and get on my machine but thats just because the way i am when im high would not be safe at all, to me a little beer aint bad as long as i watch my step, i think machining while your in a crazy mood can get you in trouble also and for me getting off of heavy equipment (i run trenchers and backhoe's and stuff part time) and then jumping on my mill is not a good move --- two totally different worlds, I also help a local friend out once in awhile on his super presicion harding chucker and sharp cnc mill, i would never even have a half beer and get on any of his machines As far as the risk goes im prepared to take a little chance with it, Im a class 4 white water kayaker, i raced Mt. bikes all over the state of colorado, iv had my F1 CBR 600 up to 156mph for miles before lifting off the throttle with nuthing more than a t-shirt shorts and no shoes! many many times, redline was 12,000 rpms and 156 was 12,500 in sixth gear, im glad i sold that thing, I think kayaking is one of the most dangerous sports iv ever done, had a friend who was class 5 and lost 17 paddeling buddies over the years to the river, thats why i stayed at class 4, i lost a brother in the yellowstone,,,, anyways its not that i dont respect machinery because i do, and the last thing i want to do is turn into a gimp and have to get my butt wiped by some gal named Olga for another 50 years, but you have to weigh that out with this senario, take great care of yourself do everything right and odds are you'll live long enough to make it to the nursing home only to be writing your name with your own poop on some wall and the clencher is you'll be spelling it wrong,
worse yet make it all the way to the bitter end only to realize you forgot to live a life, so i leave you with this,,,have fun and be safe, drink responsibly, i would feel very safe half lit and doing a 1inch frame with a little 3/32 ball end mill (making sure i wasnt wearing long sleaves of course) at the same time one beer and running a lathe is a no no for certain proceedures (for me anyways) remember --- all across america people are drinking margaritas and mixing them with machinery, ya just hope to god nobody wigs out and sticks their hand into the blades.... better safe than sorry without being sorry youv played the game to safe, what a wonderful balance life is ehh?


That reminds me of a sign that I saw at a job site not more than a year ago:

"Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave site safely and with a well preserved body, but to slide in sideways, totally worn out, saying 'Holy ****, what a ride.'"

Personally, I love beer. Most of you would consider me an alcoholic from your descriptions. Personally, the closest I'll come to machining and drinking at the same time is drinking one while my cnc mill runs a part. I'm still coherent enough to hit that big red button if I need to. No other human interaction necessary.

dicks42000
05-09-2006, 11:17 PM
AKBoomer said it well....I'd hate to live life so paranoid that I couldn't ride, paddle, fly, run, use my machines, eat, etc....Yet you don't want to be so stupid that you loose a hand, arm, foot, life.....
I've met a well known sheet metal guy here in Vancouver that is drunk most of the time, yet he still has all of his fingers. He routinely operates his nasty old 1898 vintage 10 foot alligator power shear.....And I thought my little 4 ft. jump shear was scarey!
Why is so much sheet metal equipment 19th century in design...?

GKman
05-10-2006, 08:10 AM
“whats the cut off point…”

After you’ve won all of the puking contests that you don’t remember entering.:eek:

After you’ve woke up in Vegas maried to a circus midget whose name you can’t recall.:confused:

After you’ve put your attorney’s and bail bondsman’s home numbers on speed dial.:rolleyes:

After your surgon returns your old liver to use as an anvil.

After your brewery starts sending you birthday cards.

After the judge says “you again?”

When your mother’s idea of taking care of you is buying you a grave plot.

My cutoff point was about 25 years ago and it’s been working for me so far so I think I’ll try another day.

Wirecutter
05-10-2006, 12:04 PM
every once in a while, after the day is done, and the machines are unpluged, I will get a cold one and sweep up a bit.
Tools are dangerous, so is driving to the E.R. with one arm and a blood alcohol level thats over over .08 .

Samuel
I've been known to have a beer down in the shop, but if I do, I only will perform certain operations. No milling or lathe work, no work with the big saw. Maybe a sander or a grinder, maybe the semi-auto job of cutting with the little bandsaw. Definitely no welding - my welding needs no "help" of that kind.

Another thing to consider, regarding Samuel's remarks, is how your treatment at the ER is different if you're under the influence. They're not going to be in as much of a hurry to get to you, and you're almost certainly not going to get any treatment for pain. Alcohol can limit the options available to your health provider, and when you're bleeding, you probably don't want that.

Wirecutter
05-10-2006, 12:10 PM
Oh yeah, almost forgot. Alcohol is also great for removing writing from a "Sharpie" pen and layout dye. I use the denatured stuff from Home Depot. It's nice because, unless you spill a gallon of it on the floor or something, the fumes are pretty harmless, unlike many other solvents.

Forrest Addy
05-10-2006, 12:22 PM
I know I'm a wet blanket but I used to work at a place where the accident rate tripled after lunch specifically among the crowd who went out for a brew. I know. I was on the safety comittee, my office window looked over the fence, and I tracked day by day who went to Smitty's for lunch and who stayed in the shop and gnawed their dry sandwiches from home. I calculated that lunching at Smitty's quintupled the chances of visiting the dispensery and that doesn't count bandaids, avoidable sore backs, and bruises. I won't even go into damaged equipment and spoiled work.

So no alcohol in my shop during working hours. I build stage sets now that I'm retired. If any theater types show up on a work party day, their beer is confiscated and sequestered in the refrigerator. They have to listen to my safety lecture and the have to read a copy of the shop rules and expleaain back to me the part about horseplay, practical jokes, and alcohol. So far, no-one's been stapled, bent or broken or spilled blood on my floor.

Lunch is on me and no beer for that either. After the work is done and the place swept up then we open the beer.

It's had the added benefit that only serious workers show up for work parties.

Bill Cook
05-10-2006, 12:24 PM
Growing up, there was NEVER alcohol in my father’s house.

1969, I’m 19, out on my own, and beer on the job was commonplace.

Working in an outfit that packaged lubricants for the military:

There was free soda, coffee, tea, and of course beer in the centrally located break area. Actually, it was about 20 feet from my station that day. There was no company policy that I was aware of on who could or how much. The drinking age was 21, but no one challenged me.

I was running a machine that put round quarts into cartons. On three tracks the cans would roll down and back up until there was four in each. Then the operator trips the pedal and the 12 oilcans would be pushed into the bottom the carton he was holding. Repeat, and the carton was full, turn it upright, set it on a conveyor and it was glued shut on it’s way into the truck.

The empty cans came down a chute from upstairs and were fed into the machine that filled and capped them that was “Whizzing around at amazing speed,” then around a turn on to me. If my station got behind, a bell would sound to alert the operator to shut things down - a minor inconvience.

Well as I became more and more impaired the inevitable came about. I began to get behind. Not wanting to draw attention, it seemed that shutting off the alarm bell was a good idea so I could catch up quietly.

… My impression of the machine operator when it happened was like that of a super hero – The Flash – blur, stop, blur, stop…

The containers didn’t just fall on the floor - they were captivated. He was soaked with pink hydraulic oil.

I never went back for my last paycheck.

BC

A.K. Boomer
05-10-2006, 01:04 PM
Times have changed, people dont just drink irresponsibly today heck half of them dont even work in a responsible manner, I totally agree that you cannot have workers juicing it on their lunch break, just the very social nature of drinking will put many of them over the saftey margin in a hurry, it is a recipe for a disaterous work place, but special individuals can pull this off if they pay attention and not let their luch break turn into a party but like to have a glass of red wine for the health bennie's or one beer for the taste, with a full meal and as long as your not one of those 135lb fella's you should be fine and maybe better, If you have one or two employees and eat lunch with them then thats your call although personally it would make me nevous if i was the employer even though they are legal to operate machinery America has 5% of the worlds populous and 75% of the world populous of laywers, The bottom line is you gotta listen to you, i feel much more dangerous on my mill during allergy season than if iv had a couple, if i try and tough it out and not take anything im frazzled, if i take allergy medication im fuzzy and dull, so sometimes i wont machine because of it, thats whats great about having a little shop of your own, its your decision to keep track of your abilities, but i remember as a young man watching a porsche factory video with my brother and as a 911 was being inspected for its final departure the guy rolled out from under the car with a pint in his hand, me and my bro were so amazed and looked at each other and said ---- "wow these people are good"...:D

TECHSHOP
05-10-2006, 06:31 PM
When I worked for a company that was owned by the Dutch, we would have a few Dutch " mech techs" (I don't know their actual job title) told me that they would get paid more if they agreed not to drink beer on their lunch break over there.

I am not against drinking, but I don't like most beers, so I never any in the shop; plenty of wine and 80+ proof stuff in the house, regularly replenished.

chief
05-10-2006, 07:26 PM
If I drink then I want to drink more so the machine gets turned off. I can't even drink beer while doing yard. I have no happy medium, it's drink or work.

Your Old Dog
05-10-2006, 08:15 PM
Quite frankly I have a lot of friends who work in demanding areas. Most of them are adult enough to have an occasional drink or two without maimeing anyone. Some people don't know when to quit and should never start. I've had a beer in the shop, I've also had some iced tea and frequently drink coffee. Like gloves in the shop, a properly consumed drink is not a automatic death warrant. To answer your question, two beers over an hours time wouldn't bother me. Anymore than that and I wouldn't be anygood when I got upstairs !!

cruzinonline
05-10-2006, 09:23 PM
Working in Spain we noticed there were beer machines on the turbine deck. It was cheaper than a coke. If you wanted wine, you had to go to the control room because that was where they kept it in a fridge. There was no policy but no one seemed to be inebriated. Most of the guys I worked with when I started were from Europe (one an ex-panzer commander) and beer was a standard for lunch. We would go out for lunch and have a few pitchers then go back to work. Seemed normal at the time. 20 years ago, on emergency jobs, after like 12-14 hours the foreman would go out and bring in a couple of cases of beer and some pizza while we finished up. But times have changed.

speedsport
05-10-2006, 09:44 PM
I think everyone knows the downside to drinking, can anyone give me an example of an upside?

mochinist
05-10-2006, 10:04 PM
I think everyone knows the downside to drinking, can anyone give me an example of an upside?It's fun, drunk chicks are easy, did I mention it is fun.

john hobdeclipe
05-10-2006, 10:08 PM
I think everyone knows the downside to drinking, can anyone give me an example of an upside?

Helps bleed off excess cash.

wierdscience
05-10-2006, 10:34 PM
To me that beer,soda or whatever tastes better at the end of a long productive day of work.It's a reward and part of relaxing,I guess it's what used to be known as delayed gratification.

I don't tolerate people drinking or popping pills,or smoking weed at work.Just like on the highway often times it's not the drunk that gets killed but the people around him.

Case in point was the idiot that washed down a fist full of Vicaden with a beer then proceeded to operate a crane,after he slapped the cables into a transformer we decided he needed to go home.

A.K. Boomer
05-10-2006, 10:55 PM
iv definitly seen both sides of the coin, then theres the flip side with the boss man thats so uptight he ends up giving everybody else cancer or at least a bad case of ulsers, no way to document or measure that though...
Mochinist you cut me up!

IOWOLF
05-11-2006, 04:01 AM
:rolleyes: What does Cancer have to do with it? Does the Boss blow smoke in your face or some thing?:confused:

A.K. Boomer
05-11-2006, 10:54 AM
Now that has been documented for decades and decades now, try pinning it on one person or one thing and that gets tricky, Negative emotions can contribute to hundreds of illnesses including cancer, the same way positive ones can help people heal and or cure themselves, they dont take them friendly dogs around to hospitals and nursing homes just to spread pet dander around everyones room, and when a bad bossman is replaced by a good one and everybody starts feeling better thats just not some si-fi weird arss coincidence, that stuffs for real bro ---------- their are people that just dont have a clue and wind everybody up so tight that they take all the joy out of everything, then their are people that pull people together and make them feel like part of the team --- on a day to day basis this is huge to overall health, can it contribute to cancer, yup, not because i say so, the entire healthcare industry says so...
How we feel and relate to our environment is just as important as what we eat, drink,and breathe... Granted some things are more instant and show up quicker like i guarantee that you woof down some plutonium 239 and your days (or hours) are numbered -------------------- What the heck does this have to do with beer?!!!! Distantly related --- The funnest Boss iv ever had used to have me make a beer run at noon time almost daily, we would tip a few - he more than me because i had to run the service department and work on hi-perf motorcycles, i kept a very level head --- it was up to me to behave and i did for the entire duration (5 years+) without incident, during that time we would hear of tons of screw ups at the other shops in town by the mechanics - we were suzuki/kawasaki and for the most part after awhile had most of the business from the yamaha shop and the honda shop, If i had one pet peive it was that you couldnt take this guy serious! what a blast though, thats been over two decades ago and Me and Gordon still hang once in awhile, I used to always ask him what kind of frosties he wanted for lunch (thats what he called beer) he would shout back "SURPRISE ME" ,,, what a corker, but what a great environment he created...