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BillH
07-21-2006, 03:37 PM
Im visiting my parents before I go down to Miami to go back to school for aviation courses that I need for my future career as an Air Traffic Controller. If any of you remembered me saying from a year ago, my shop is in storage. I had thoughts of actually selling my southbend lathe, and other tools. Well yesterday I oiled her up, removed some surface rust :0 which scared me, and put more oil in the headstock to make sure that stays lubricated. After having done all of that, I couldnt help but think how stupid it would of been to sell what I had accumulated. Years before I had an enco 9x20 that I never used and when we moved from the original house, I never thought I would of used it. So I sold it, moments later it hit me like a brick wall, what the hell did I just do? Thats what I get for listening to my dad who is a major negative force about everything other than making your wallet fatter. Anyhow I wiped Rem oil all over her which I use to keep rust off my guns, so I figure if it works on guns, probably work well on the lathe as well.
Since I oiled up the lathe I've been hit very hard with an urge to make more chips, its been over 1 year since I last made chips. I've even been brushing up my german reading skills(none existent) to find information on a certain german locomotive I want to make a gauge 1 live steam model out of. I'll only be able to make cad drawings and the design of it however while im in Florida.
I have no idea when I'll ever be able to use that lathe again, and I have no idea where I will end up, but Im not going to sell it. It could be 5 years down the road until I have my own house, my own workshop. The unknown sucks.

SGW
07-21-2006, 04:18 PM
I, and probably everybody else here, would encourage you to hang onto it. Good South Bend lathes are only going to get more difficult to find.

There's no rush. I didn't really get a shop going until I was 31 and finally bought my own house. A friend and I have joked (?) that what we're doing is spending our working careers accumulating tools so we can use them after we retire, when we have the time.

bob308
07-21-2006, 05:04 PM
look at from this side you will never replace it for what you would get for it right now.

Alistair Hosie
07-21-2006, 05:16 PM
Bill hang on in there pal things will work out don't listen to the money money money arguments hold on and don't do things which you will regret Alistair

pstephens
07-21-2006, 05:50 PM
Bill, this hits very close to home with me.

Back in the mid-80's I purchased a new 10k lathe from South Bend, along with most of the accessories available. Over the next several years I built more stuff for it, mostly from the Metal Lathe Accessories kits. It was a dream setup for the home shop hobbyist/modelmaker. Then, my work required that I move cross-country. I remember thinking at the time: "I don't want to haul all this 'stuff' with me!" Famous last words. I'm too ashamed to even disclose the sale price. It sickens me to this day, as I feel the pinch of what it now costs to even come close to what I foolishly pissed away. This all happened several seconds before eBay became the world's flea market, and all things South Bend got bid into the stratosphere.

DON'T SELL IT.

Wirecutter
07-21-2006, 07:31 PM
Ditto here, BillH. Hang in there.

As an alternative, I have a little space in my shop - I can store it for you for a few years.

-Mark

BillH
07-21-2006, 08:17 PM
Advice all very well taken, I'll never sell that lathe. Sure It has some minor issues, nothing that cant be fixed, after all, thats what being a machinist is after all right?

nheng
07-21-2006, 08:36 PM
The only thing I'd add to the good advice already given is that if you can at all swing it, put together a small, portable, suitcase shop to keep the juices flowing. A Sherline is very light, fun to play with and is a good candidate for an under-the-bed machine shop. You could even play with N or H scale parts while waiting ;)

In my late teens, I had a nice instrument lathe which was very similar to or actually was, a Hardinge cataract with collet set and lever closer. When my folks headed to FL themselves and lacking trustworthy storage, I sold my machines (lathe, dp, metal bandsaw). About once a year I would refresh the foot imprint on my own behind. Den

thistle
07-21-2006, 09:47 PM
Wrong attitude- take the lathe put it under your bed,on your bed and sleep on the floor,suspend it from the ceiling ,or whatever ,make stuff instead of watching television or whatever inconsiquential things you will end up doing - do everything you possibly can to pursue your interest other wise you will be 75 before you know it and will be telling every one that you have a lathe that you never used .

x39
07-21-2006, 11:30 PM
Hang on to that son of a gun! You may have to house it, but you don't have to feed it. When I think back on some of the cool stuff I've foolishly let go of through the years it sickens me.

BillH
07-21-2006, 11:47 PM
Hang on to that son of a gun! You may have to house it, but you don't have to feed it. When I think back on some of the cool stuff I've foolishly let go of through the years it sickens me.
I miss my Ar15 and romanian ak47, although it was those two things I sold that allowed me to buy the South bend and additional tooling.

wierdscience
07-21-2006, 11:58 PM
Look at it as an investment,it's worth more now than what it cost new and in the future it will be worth more than what you paid for it and the sense of achievement it produces is priceless.

wierdscience
07-22-2006, 12:00 AM
There's no rush. I didn't really get a shop going until I was 31 and finally bought my own house. A friend and I have joked (?) that what we're doing is spending our working careers accumulating tools so we can use them after we retire, when we have the time.

That's me in a nutshell,if I live long enough I'm gonna have one heck of a shop:D