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spkrman15
07-23-2006, 06:42 AM
Can it be done?

Rob :)

John Stevenson
07-23-2006, 07:03 AM
Yes but you need carbide tooling, it's very abrasive.

.

Ian B
07-23-2006, 07:39 AM
The fine white powder that results from machining fibreglass makes a very good and cheap substitute for talcum powder; rub it under your arms and any other sensitive areas. let us know how you get on...

Ian

thistle
07-23-2006, 08:18 AM
its also excellent for ensuring your tools last for years and years .

is it machinable ?
depends what you want to do,with out saying what you are doing it is difficult to give an opinion.

Mark Hockett
07-23-2006, 02:25 PM
I worked as a machinist for a large aerospace composite manufacture. We machined lots of fiberglass. It is very damaging to machine tools and tooling. The dust created from machining is like very fine sand. It sticks to every oily surface (ways, lead screws, ball screws) on the machines where it works like lapping compound. It is also hazardous to breath. The best way to help keep the dust down is use flood coolant but then the residue will plug up the coolant system very quickly. If you don't have an enclosed machine and flood coolant with a good filter system I wouldn't recommend machining it.


Mark Hockett
Island Tech Enterprises
Clinton, WA 98236
360-914-6026

More chip less lip

Evan
07-23-2006, 04:12 PM
There are few materials I dislike more than fiberglass. It's a tossup between fiberglass and freshly used diapers. I would rather have my thumbnail ripped off by a spinning chuck than machine fiberglass. The only thing worse than machining fiberglass is laying it up. I have done both.

motorworks
07-23-2006, 04:18 PM
I machine it now and then.
Hook up the shop vac close to the tool.
and yes wear a mask

Millman
07-23-2006, 06:05 PM
{{ I would rather have my thumbnail ripped off by a}} NO, you wouldn't. Mark sounds like he has experience also. Fiberglass and fiberglass composites are well machined. One trick is high RPM. Similar to the Mica family, you can achieve glass smooth surfaces with a good entry angle fly cutting. Milling is a little tougher, but attainable. As usual, don't breathe any more than necessary. Piece of cake.

John Stevenson
07-23-2006, 06:19 PM
{quote=Evan}
It's a tossup between machining fiberglass and freshly used diapers. I have done both.
{/quote}

Millman
07-23-2006, 06:22 PM
Looks like some guys are better at computers, than machining.

tattoomike68
07-23-2006, 07:22 PM
The fine white powder that results from machining fibreglass makes a very good and cheap substitute for talcum powder; rub it under your arms and any other sensitive areas. let us know how you get on...

Ian

LMAO!

Fiberglass machines just fine, it does make a mess of coolent and the machine, even rags used to clean up are loaded with tiny needles of glass.

I will machine it at work but We charge a little more time for prep and clean up.

A vaccume running rigged up close to the tool is the best way, add some chunks of cardboard or news paper laying Around to catch the mess.

Millman
07-23-2006, 07:26 PM
Yes, let's not be snorting that either; your lungs will be fried enough without snorting.

Herm Williams
07-23-2006, 07:32 PM
when you breath the dust that causes silicosis. it keeps adding up.
I avoid it if possible.
my two cents worth

Tin Falcon
07-23-2006, 09:12 PM
Rob:
I worked in the R&D dept of a yacht manufacturer for 6 years. So just about everthing that can be done to and with fiberglass I have done. Your question is a bit vague. It can be drilled and sawed with regular tooling but carbide or grit type blades last longer. We also leaned more to air powered tools than electric. It is messy and the dust is nasty. If you can be more specific I will do my best to answer the question.
Regards
Tin

spkrman15
07-24-2006, 10:34 AM
Thanks for the responses.

I kept my question vague on purpose. I don't have anything immediately that needs machining. I work at a water park and some of our pumps are plastic and the rides are fierglass. I have had a lot of problems getting parts for some of my filter pumps, made by Jacuzzi, which is going through a buy-out right now. I.E. no parts are available.

I considered fiberglassing some of the parts and then remachining them to specs. I know of the helath risks when it comes to fiberglass, but i was woundering the viability of that kind of repair.

For you folks that want to know exactly what i wanted to fix, it was the seal plate that houses the mechanical seal. The pump ran dry and warped the plastic. 6-8 weeks for another one. By that time our season would be over. So i bought a new pump from another manufacturer.

Rob :)

hitnmiss
07-24-2006, 12:30 PM
Looks like some guys are better at computers, than machining.

Some guys are more abrasive than others!

Millman
07-24-2006, 12:34 PM
Got that right.