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View Full Version : OT: Getting a bulldozer off a truck



Scatterplot
07-29-2006, 04:30 AM
I must admit, very creative.
http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=18781

Fasttrack
07-29-2006, 11:53 AM
Certainly creative...:)

They do something similiar at grain elevators - they have a lift that willl lift a semi or grain truck to near verticle to allow the grain to pour out the back if you dont have a hopper-bottom trailer! It's a little nerve wracking to see a full size semi truck and trailer raised almost verticle when your right behind it!!

Wirecutter
07-29-2006, 02:39 PM
Now that's cool. I was really expecting a dramatic finish, like the truck "squirting" forward and the bed of the truck being damaged. But it looks like at least a little thought went into doing it right. That's pretty clever, and probably a lot faster than the "right" way.

I wonder if they can do the same in reverse?

-Mark

JRouche
07-29-2006, 04:05 PM
Hate to be that back axle.

Looks like they have done that many times. Knew exactly where to put the scoop when the truck tilted up, the scoop met the ground. Hats off to those folks, getter-done...JRouche

tattoomike68
07-29-2006, 04:26 PM
That was slick, I was waiting for the big bounce too.

Willy
07-29-2006, 06:14 PM
Yep those boys have definetly done that before,but as already mentioned it's hard on the truck.How hard is it anyway to drop a coulple of ramps?Sure glad it's not my truck.:eek: Speaking of no ramps here's one that's always had me scratchin my head,wish I could have been sellin popcorn, beer and taking bets on this one./http://www.funny-games.biz/pictures/544-no_problem.html (http://www.funny-games.biz/pictures/544-no_problem.html)

John Stevenson
07-29-2006, 06:36 PM
Yes did you notice how the driver waited for the truck to start to move down then removed the chock from the wheels, threw it on the back and turned away.
Done that before and didn't need to look, he knew what was happening.

The link Willy posted is interesting.
I want to know how he gets out when he's emptied the hopper truck :D

.

Wareagle
07-29-2006, 06:47 PM
You gotta hand it to them, they're resourceful!

Optics Curmudgeon
07-29-2006, 07:20 PM
I hate to be a picky pain in the butt, but that's not a bulldozer. I am a curmudgeon, after all.

John Stevenson
07-29-2006, 07:31 PM
Even a bulldozer isn't a bulldozer, sorry to be picky .

.

IOWOLF
07-29-2006, 07:53 PM
We had a news lady call a dragline a steamshovel just the other night.Boy did I want to straighten her out but stuff like that happens al the time.

Ya gotta laugh sometimes.

Wareagle
07-29-2006, 08:05 PM
I'd like to have seen how they loaded the track hoe on that truck (considering how they unloaded it)! :D

And I bet that machine is about all that truck wanted!

Mickey_D
07-29-2006, 11:20 PM
I had to rent a big bobcat a couple of months ago and all they had left were the OLD trailers. Ramps bent like a U and the bars that went to the ground were all knocked off. When we hooked the trailer to my GMC and backed the bobcat on the tail of the trailer went down to the ground and the back tires of the truck were four feet off the ground. I went real slow and it felt a hell of a lot better than the normal lurching and slipping up the ramps wondering if you are about to go over the edge of the ramps. When I hit the tipping point, the trailer just eased on down. Just make sure that you block the trailer wheels.

alcova
07-30-2006, 12:03 AM
the railroads do that often to unload the gravel and ties from those cars...really strange to watch them move up to the next car using to same process.

Walt

Bond
07-30-2006, 12:53 AM
I had to rent a big bobcat a couple of months ago and all they had left were the OLD trailers. Ramps bent like a U and the bars that went to the ground were all knocked off. When we hooked the trailer to my GMC and backed the bobcat on the tail of the trailer went down to the ground and the back tires of the truck were four feet off the ground. I went real slow and it felt a hell of a lot better than the normal lurching and slipping up the ramps wondering if you are about to go over the edge of the ramps. When I hit the tipping point, the trailer just eased on down. Just make sure that you block the trailer wheels.
You want to try getting one off with the truck hooked to the trailer.

Bond
07-30-2006, 12:55 AM
Typed to quick ment without truck hooked to trailer

jmm360
07-30-2006, 01:23 AM
I'm so new at machining that I find many things fascinating that are probably mundane to most of you. Creations and solutions in metal...
But I have spent decades in the seats of all kinds of heavy equipment and that video is a great example of how not to do it. A hoe that size should be on a lowboy not a ramp truck, but even still there is no excuse for picking the steer tires off the ground. Whatever town you live in, there are far better operators within a mile or two than that guy.

matador
07-30-2006, 02:48 AM
This is actually a very common way of getting machinery on/off trucks in the east.Granted,most trucks have hydraulic rams mounted on either side of the bed near the cab.These lift the front of the truck high enough for the beavertail to reach ground level.Don't worry about the trucks rear suspension,they are high-articulation bogies built for the job.
Some types have normal 20" front wheels,and only 16" wheels at the back to aid loading/unloading.
In any case,how do they get tracked machinery of lowloaders that don't have a beavertail?A very similar operation to what's shown here.
Local contractors often carry their machines in the back of their tiptruck,using ramps carried under the bed.They use the boom to steady the machine and prevent the truck tipping over backwards while unloading.
It's amazing what they do with limited equipment.But i wouldn't stand too close in any case,and the driver of the truck seems to feel the same way.You see him giving the machine a wide berth:D

Willy
07-30-2006, 07:18 AM
Yes ,but the usual procedure is to flip the ramps down that are usually attached to the beavertail....they are spring loaded and ordinarily ride upsidedown on the beavertail,until when they are needed,then they are adjusted to the track width of the loaded veihicle and flopped down.It takes about 20 seconds per side.This isn't a procedure you would do to to your own truck on a reguler basis.It's not hard on the rear end,but very hard on the rear suspesion bushings and frame components.Can you spell "cracked frame crossmembers"?

Orrin
07-30-2006, 12:31 PM
I'd like to have seen how they loaded the track hoe on that truck (considering how they unloaded it)!

I suspect they loaded the track hoe like they unloaded it, but with the steps done in reverse. Use the boom to tip the tracks up, back the truck under, etc.

Orrin

LastOldDog
07-30-2006, 07:06 PM
What ever became of the goose neck trailers that would kneel to the ground in the front? Pull the pins on the neck and drive out of the way, then load/unload from the front? Back up, re-attatch the neck, cylinders lift the front, replace the pins, then hit the road. Hydraulics built in to the goosneck. I've seen this many times at the quarries, for shovels, loaders, dozers, cans etc. Sweet two/three man operation including pilot vehicles. Lloyd

IOWOLF
07-30-2006, 07:20 PM
I bet it was a 3rd world country, or England . ;)

rvannatta
07-30-2006, 09:54 PM
:cool:
What ever became of the goose neck trailers that would kneel to the ground in the front? Pull the pins on the neck and drive out of the way, then load/unload from the front? Back up, re-attatch the neck, cylinders lift the front, replace the pins, then hit the road. Hydraulics built in to the goosneck. I've seen this many times at the quarries, for shovels, loaders, dozers, cans etc. Sweet two/three man operation including pilot vehicles. Lloyd
lowboys commonly have removable goose necks. This works just fine until
you mire the truck in the mud and have to unload to recover. Then if it is a tracked machine, you unchain it, pivot it 90 degrees and drive it over the side of the trailer.

Where there is a lot of moving to be done they are often loaded over the side as well. Lay down a log of good diameter or a pile a couple dump truck loads of rock

IF width isn't an issue (as in off highway), tracked machines are best hauled crossways anyway. then if they slide off it won't hurt anything.
IT chews up the planks a bit to turn the machine on the trailer but it can be done. YOu can see a removable goodneck at work at General Trailer (http://www.vannattabros.com/iron11.html)

john hobdeclipe
07-30-2006, 11:19 PM
I'm so new at machining that I find many things fascinating that are probably mundane to most of you. Creations and solutions in metal...
But I have spent decades in the seats of all kinds of heavy equipment and that video is a great example of how not to do it. A hoe that size should be on a lowboy not a ramp truck, but even still there is no excuse for picking the steer tires off the ground. Whatever town you live in, there are far better operators within a mile or two than that guy.

Play the clip again, and listen closely. The chatter and talk is, I would guess, African. This is a good example of resourcefulness, of people doing the max with a minimum of equipment. They are doing what they have to do to get a job done with the tools available. Chances are there's not proper lowboy to be had within five hundred miles.

That said, I would like to have seen their first attempt. Bet it wasn't all that slick!

A few months ago I watched an inexperienced operator trying to drive a hoe about that same size out of a muddy hole. He kept slipping back. Then a more experienced, older guy took over, spun the rig around, dug the bucket into the ground and walked himself out of the hole using the tracks and the boom together.

I'm always impressed with the guys who handle this heavy equipment with such skill and smoothness. I rented a little bobcat a couple years ago to grade the area for my new shop; I just about pounded myself to death, nearly turned it over a couple of times, and gave myself a couple of nice dirt baths too. Just thankfull I didn't have any fire ant nests mixed in with it!

jmm360
07-30-2006, 11:57 PM
Point taken John H
I watched it again and agree I was too critical. Still, a couple 12x12's under the beavertails makes for a safer offload and happier truck. If you ever get a chance to see a big excavation in your area, look for the guy digging benches and climbing the hoe down 6' at a time. It's a pretty agile machine.

Wareagle
07-31-2006, 01:38 AM
I suspect they loaded the track hoe like they unloaded it, but with the steps done in reverse. Use the boom to tip the tracks up, back the truck under, etc.

Orrin

No doubt there! That would make for an interesting view, though.

Along the lines of operators handling heavy equipment; I was fortunate enough to see a HE operator competition several years back. The one event that stands out in my mind was where the operator of a track hoe would pick up an egg with the bucket, and set it down 180 degrees from the pick point on top of a cardboard box (without crushing it). Some succeeded, some failed (usually the egg!).

After operating some HE myself (if operating is what you'd call it), it gives a great appreciation for what those guys can do with a machine!

Steve Stube
07-31-2006, 09:01 AM
Willie beat me to it somewhat and no I don't have photos but a talented local backhoe operator likes to load and unload his backhoe in his dumptruck unassisted. It's his means of transporting it to and from the job. Generally draws a crowd.

ulav8r
07-31-2006, 11:22 AM
When I was about 10-12 yo watched a D6 being loaded, trailer was about 2-3 feet high (45 yr old memory is fading). Operator used 4 8x8 blocks about 2 feet long. Placed 1 block crossways on the ground in front of each track. Second block was placed crossways on top of the first block, inline with the track and trailer. As he pulled forward the top block tipped down and the dozer climbed it. the front of the tracks went well above the end of the trailer before the dozer tipped back down and climbed onto the trailer.

Memorable unload several years later. Was in a second floor office, heard a thud. Looked out the window and saw a dozer on the edge of the street. Truck driver took a curve too fast and the dozer went off the side of the trailer. Dug a 3" gouge in the asphalt.

LastOldDog
07-31-2006, 01:25 PM
:cool:
lowboys commonly have removable goose necks. This works just fine until
you mire the truck in the mud and have to unload to recover. Then if it is a tracked machine, you unchain it, pivot it 90 degrees and drive it over the side of the trailer.

Great response, very informitive, brings back memories, thanx. Lloyd

John Stevenson
07-31-2006, 01:31 PM
I bet it was a 3rd world country, or England . ;)

England is a third world country.
We are that crowded and hemmed in that here is nothing I need in engineering supplies is greater than 7 miles away.
Most is within a mile radius.

.

Guido
07-31-2006, 01:47 PM
Land based drilling rigs, in the good 'ol days, were rigged up without the aid of any type of crane. That included 40 foot slope topped ramps, on which drivers backed up, preparatory to unloading rig draw works onto ten foot high subbases.

Vivid memories of:

http://www.mylittlesalesman.com/frontend/ad.aspx?item=7743

rigup trucks, with 130K lb Tulsa winches and 1 1/4 inch dia. cable played out over a roller tailgate. Backed tailgate to tailgate and winching a loaded float off the ground, up and over the roller to a 5th wheel, it was not uncommon to see the truck's front wheels come off the ground by 3 or 5 feet.


G

john hobdeclipe
07-31-2006, 02:01 PM
I think that major construction / excavation sites should erect bleachers, sell refreshments, sell little brochures that explain what's going on, maybe have some cheerleaders...

Elninio
08-01-2006, 02:34 AM
Yep those boys have definetly done that before,but as already mentioned it's hard on the truck.How hard is it anyway to drop a coulple of ramps?Sure glad it's not my truck.:eek: Speaking of no ramps here's one that's always had me scratchin my head,wish I could have been sellin popcorn, beer and taking bets on this one./http://www.funny-games.biz/pictures/544-no_problem.html (http://www.funny-games.biz/pictures/544-no_problem.html)

those arms are sure solid

jmm360
08-01-2006, 10:01 AM
Now THAT guy has some big brass ones...

cam m
08-01-2006, 08:17 PM
I met a one armed man who operated a 580 Case wheel hoe and a tandem gravel truck with a 5 &4 main-auxiliary transmission combo. He used to load his hoe in the tandem like the rail car pictures. When I worked with him he was running water trucks with standard transmissions. He could run the trucks up and down through the gears way smoother than I ever could...

Evan
08-01-2006, 08:45 PM
This is one of my favorites.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/bomb1.jpg

jmm360
08-01-2006, 10:42 PM
I printed out the pics of the backhoe going into the railcar and brought them to work, the boss says that was at the railyard in Centralia, Wa some years ago when he worked at the Cat dealer there, they had all kinds of pictures of it. Looking closer at the pics he has some kind of clamp on the loader bucket, I still don't see how he got from pic 3 to pic 4 without having blocked it up, there isn't enough stick on it to push ahead 2x the wheelbase. I've climbed out of tight spots but nothing half that extreme. Which brings up the question of how he got it out after unloading the railcar. The boss muttered something about the guy being a maniac and shook his head, I take it to mean he was from Maine where I can confirm they export some fine operators, I've worked with quite a few.

Evan
08-02-2006, 11:45 AM
I still don't see how he got from pic 3 to pic 4 without having blocked it up,

I was wondering that myself. Could he have pulled the rail car toward the hoe?

greywynd
08-02-2006, 01:35 PM
There's a company in the states that modify the hoes to do this, but I can't for the life of me recall the site or name. I know I've been to their site and watched the video though. I'll try to see if I can find it again.

Mark

cam m
08-02-2006, 04:38 PM
I don't think he pulled the rail car to the hoe, I think he slid the hoe onto the railcar using the hoe boom and dipper (based on looking at the material in the rail car). I am a bit confused how he did that based on the amount of "throw" on the bucket. Looking at the position of the hoe bucket relative to the pickup in the background, I think he had to move the bucket forward about the time the CG of the hoe was on the edge of the railcar...

Evan
08-02-2006, 04:55 PM
Maybe he bunny hopped it with the hoe bucket? It would be really hard on the hydraulics.

One day I was following a large articulated loader/hoe down the road. I always stay well back since you never know what rocks and other crap might fall off. I heard a loud BANG from up ahead and out from under the machine bounced a very big universal joint about the size of a soccer ball. It bounced right up to windshield height for somebody following at a normal distance. I was able to avoid it.

At the same time it punched a hole in his hydraulic tank and all the oil fell out in a few seconds. He just barely made it to a stop as he was heading to the ditch with no steering.

Makes me wonder what would happen to the guy on the rail car if he blew a line on the way up.

jmm360
08-02-2006, 09:08 PM
My latest theory is the the clamp looking thing on the loader bucket actually locked on to the railcar and he then curled the bucket back a little to take the entire weight of the machine while he raised and repositioned the hoe bucket to get another push with the stick. That's how I'd do it except I'd never do it. Like to watch it though.

greywynd
08-03-2006, 01:14 AM
Here it is:

http://www.herzogcompanies.com/rrservices/cartopper.php

There's a video link too.

Mark

Willy
08-03-2006, 01:38 AM
Thank you Mark for shedding a little light on the subject,the video explains everything.The pictures were not really clear enough to see the undercarriage or the front bucket mounts on the backhoe.Now that I've seen the video I can definitely make them out.I can sleep again now that I know that I won't have to try that.:D

greywynd
08-03-2006, 10:30 AM
I notice that they only show the machines loading/unloading with the buckets on the hoe, and they are extra wide (I'm thinking for stability.)

I also realize that they don't actually show them loading/unloading a machine with a small attachment (say the magnets for example).

Listening to the video, they also state that the machines aren't for sale, only for hire with their operators.

Mark

LastOldDog
08-03-2006, 08:14 PM
Makes me wonder what would happen to the guy on the rail car if he blew a line on the way up.

I suspect in this application each cyl was equipped with pilot operated valves.

Blow a hose, cyl stops immediately. Either replace the hose and bleed the system, or, bleed it down, your call. In my experience, arial ladders and snorkels had flange mounted pilot valves on the cyls, even outriggers an/or stabilizers. Perhaps this operator has a rope ladder stowed in the cab, a la James Bond.

Lloyd

jmm360
08-03-2006, 09:49 PM
"Blow a hose, cyl stops immediately. "
Not in my experience. In this case I suspect it would be 'blow a hose, call the medics'... The main valve bodies are mounted on the chassis, the cylinder hoses are at full pressure, probably close to relief pressure when the whole weight of the hoe is on them. Except for maybe really late model hoes pilot systems aren't that common.

LastOldDog
08-04-2006, 02:14 AM
"Blow a hose, cyl stops immediately. "
Not in my experience. In this case I suspect it would be 'blow a hose, call the medics'... The main valve bodies are mounted on the chassis, the cylinder hoses are at full pressure, probably close to relief pressure when the whole weight of the hoe is on them. Except for maybe really late model hoes pilot systems aren't that common.

I am in agreement with your statement. Well stated. The main control valves ARE remote from the cyls. (I’m an old two stick guy) If a hose blows on the bucket, dipper, swing, outrigger, it's likely not a life threatening experience. Apparently I missed the nature of the thread. I was thinking of personal hazard to an operator if the equipment became unstable to the extent it created a threat to the operator. Sorry.

My comments related to real time experience with Fire Dept equipment (aerial ladders and snorkels) wherein the pilots were direct flange mounted to welded flanges on the cyls. No hoses, one ‘O’ ring. So, if a connector hose failed, no fluid could enter or exit the cyl. The pilot must 'see' signal pressure in excess of the cyl pres. In the event of hose failure, the pilots would not open, hence no fluid could pass either direction. This is different than your experience, I misunderstood, we're cool.

Real life experience. During a training exercise, I had 2 new guys with me at the top of an aerial ladder, ~80' up, straight off the side of the truck over a parking lot. The Engineer (driver) observed the stabilizers on the OFF side (the cool side) slightly off the ground. With out thinking, he tried to set the feet down. Well, the pressure on the working side (the HOT side) was more than the system pressure at idle. Guess what, fluid ran backwards through the system and we dropped ~32' before he released the lever. If these cyls had been equipped with pilots, this near tragedy would never had occurred.

My opinion only - Pilots should be affixed to the cyls, NOT connected by hoses. Otherwise, "Call the medics" (your quote), very apropos.

Lloyd

jmm360
08-04-2006, 10:19 AM
3 guys on a ladder dropped 32'? Hope you keep some clean shorts handy...
I like the idea of having the valve at the flange but on a ground engaging or material handling machine that makes it way too vulnerable to being broken off. That (great) video was too distant to make out the connections except for the retract (dump) end of the bucket cylinder which didn't show anything unusual mounted there. I've never needed the medics but I'm sure glad they're there.