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View Full Version : Home shop machinist vs Machinist workshop?



Belstain
02-19-2003, 05:40 PM
I'm thinking about getting a subscription but don't know which one to get. What's the difference?

Spin Doctor
02-19-2003, 07:56 PM
While both are have articles related to the HSM devotee there are some differences
HSM while having some project articles in each issue( single issue projects and multiple issue ones )it also contains related articles concerning techniques, machinery reviews( Neil, could we see more of those but only if they show the goob with the bad ) and other machining related articles. One that I would like to see is an article on the IMTS show.
PiM is exclusively project articles that can be displayed in one issue as far as I've been able to see.

jdk
02-19-2003, 08:47 PM
you can't go wrong with either one. There is always something of interest with each issue.

Techtchr
02-19-2003, 09:53 PM
I've been subsribing to HSM since early 80s and to PiM since they started. I look forward to receiving both. My Mother in law has seen fit to renew my HSM subscription for my birthday for about the last 15 years. Get both if you can affords it or find a great mother in law.

Matt

Thrud
02-19-2003, 10:00 PM
I still don't know, but I do like both and will continue to subscribe to both and buy Live Steam locally from a train shop that handles the english mags ME, and MEW.

Mike L
02-20-2003, 10:27 AM
I also subscribe to both. Can't say that I prefer one over the other.

The best reason to get both is so you can read one while waiting for the other come. You don't get both at the same time, and the wait between issues in a long one (4 times a year?)



------------------
Mike L
Amateur machinist, self-taught. I had a poor teacher, but I was a good student.

lynnl
02-20-2003, 06:23 PM
Yeah I get both too. Would hate to be without either one. In fact I like 'em so much I may start getting 2 copies of each! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Neil
02-21-2003, 09:14 AM
When MW was created, it was intended to offer projects which could be made after you had built your rotary table, vise, collets, or whatever, in HSM. The original name of MW was Projects in Metal because of that venue. MW was expanded to include such items as gunsmithing, which didn't fall into the general HSM category. That's the truncated history of MW.

These are the basic differences between the two magazines. HSM has the more-involved articles... often running serially over several issues. MW has less-involved projects which are more easily handled by the novice. HSM articles are generally focused on the machines while MW has more things to do with the machines. HSM rarely carries any gunsmithing articles while MW frequently does.

The articles which appear in HSM will not appear in MW and vise-versa.

Regarding machinery reviews, I would like to come up with a defined performance outline which would help the readers make an informed decision about their purchases. It's still early in the design stage.

Hope this helps and thanks for your support.

Neil

ZINOM
02-22-2003, 02:00 AM
I subscribe to both, and I read, and re-read them constantly!

What I don't have use for today, I will some months down the road and that kind of reference material is invaluable for somone like me....having no formal instruction.

Sometimes it's just something small, like a photo showing how someone has secured a workpiece that I can apply to my own project.

I don't mean to gush, but I've found both mags key in helping me to do the work I'd wanted to explore, and have also given me an inside look at what many people accomplish all in the name of their "hobbies".

Hats off to all the staff, and contributors!

John

www.mpiretattoo.com (http://www.mpiretattoo.com)

boroko
02-22-2003, 06:55 AM
I recently had the opportunity to visit Village Press where they are printed. I enjoy both magazines, but haven't subscribed for any length of time. I had to decide how to catch up and asked if I could see some of the books that they offer in their ads. They were more than willing to let me sit for hours and sample all that they published. I walked out with $275 in books. Kind of a crash course. At first I glossed over some of the projects that didn't appeal to me but soon learned that they were full of little shortcuts and work-arounds that I would have missed otherwise. Good stuff, good people too.

Just a suggestion for those that can't get enough and can't stand waiting for the mail each month.
Mark

Tim#1
02-22-2003, 07:35 AM
Neil Knopf probably posted the best answer to your question. I'd recommend getting a subscription to both magazines. I'd also start buying the hardcover books that contain the articles from the years you've missed. I think this is an investment that is well worth the money.

I've learned more than I can recall from HSM and MW. And being a member of this BBS helps greatly too. Good luck!

Regards,

TIM

SGW
02-22-2003, 08:19 AM
I've found over the years that no magazine can be "it." I've subscribed to Live Steam, Model Engineer, Engineering in Miniature, Home Shop Machinist, Projects in Metal, Modeltec, Strictly I.C., ...???
I've probably never gotten an issue of any of them where I was interested in every article, but I've gotten good information out of all of them. Occasionally, a issue would come along where, for me, a magazine's content would be pretty much as wash-out...except for one little gem, tucked into some article I otherwise found uninteresting.

There is SO much to learn about this hobby, and it is SO broad in scope, that I figure if 50% of a magazine, or even a good solid 25%, is in my immediate line of interest, it's about as good as I can reasonably expect. And the other 50% or 75% will likely be of interest, someday. Unlike mass-market magazines, the content of a 20-year-old issue of Home Shop machinist is just as relevant today as it was when it was published.

chip's
02-23-2003, 07:33 PM
As has been stated, you just can't go wrong with both magazines. Try and get both. You will really appreciate it.

Spin Doctor
02-23-2003, 10:20 PM
Neil for a defined performance outline in regards to machine reveiws
Milling Machines take the capabiblities and size of a Bridgeport as the extreme upper limit
In terms of Lathes, the range of 14x40 would probably be the upper range for the HSM
When defining performance
Specify maximum depth of cut and feed that can be acheived.
Staightness of cut.
Vibration levels of the rotating groups when not in a cut for those of us familar with vibration analysis
Diminsional accuracy of the manufactures product, ie are the dovetails on a milling machine straight?
In general when the things we would really like to know before hand. I just hope that any advertisers that you have understand that if they get slammed in a review they should take it as constructive critisism.

Axel
02-25-2003, 11:44 AM
I only have MW, since I usually only like the adverts! Not that the mag is bad, couse it's very exellent. But I'm drowning in things to be read anyway! The adverts are good to see though...