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BobWarfield
08-05-2006, 02:48 AM
I made a CNC Dictionary for those who want to learn more. Since I am in that category, there may be some errors and ommissions!

http://www.thewarfields.com/MTCNCDictionary.htm

Cheers,

BW

JRouche
08-05-2006, 04:13 AM
Very nice Bob. Thanks, JRouche

Elninio
08-05-2006, 04:36 AM
Who would have tought? Its one of those great ideas that are hard to come by :D

rockrat
08-05-2006, 11:03 AM
Nice job. Many have threatened to make a page like that but I dont think that it was ever done.

rock-

HTRN
08-05-2006, 01:36 PM
Bob, after just a quick look, you left out "Tombstone", and your definition of screw machine isn't really right.


HTRN

BobWarfield
08-05-2006, 02:08 PM
HTRN, I will add Tombstone, its a good one for sure.

On Screw Machine, I used this definition:

http://www.toolingu.com/class_class_desc.aspx?class_ID=200160

I have found several others, including their definition of "American Type Screw Machine" on the same page. They all seem subtley different. Somewhere else they said it was the same as a Swiss Lathe, which is definitely not correct.

Can you suggest a better definition?

Best Regards, and thanks for the help,

BW

Millman
08-05-2006, 02:58 PM
Screw machine is kind of an open term. Usually multi-spindle, sometimes single spindle like the old Brown and Sharpes, and they left out the 5 spindle Davenports. Most of the time a finished part in one revolution, sometimes second-operations were performed.

HTRN
08-05-2006, 08:44 PM
Perhaps a better idea is a second definition.

a "Swiss type" screw machine can best be defined as a machine tool, either cam operated, or controlled by electronics and software, that has single point tools arrayed radially around rotating stock, where the stock moves in the "Z" axis, instead of a carriage onto which tools would be fixed as in a conventional lathe.

At least that's how the Citizen CNC Swiss Screw machines work that I've used.

You could also define it as the most aggravating $%()*($ piece of $%$% in the entire shop.:D

HTRN

S_J_H
08-05-2006, 08:59 PM
Thanks and excellent job! I bookmarked it.
Steve

Evan
08-05-2006, 11:08 PM
You could round out the alphabet with X, Y and Z axis. :)

Looks good.

BobWarfield
08-06-2006, 03:18 AM
You could round out the alphabet with X, Y and Z axis. :)

Looks good.

There ya go, with diagrams as well.

Best,

BW

Evan
08-06-2006, 03:34 AM
You did miss one rather important term: Origin

BobWarfield
08-06-2006, 02:04 PM
Sure. I added Right-Hand Rule while I was at it.

Really brings home the true nature of the term "Drip Feed". LOL

Cheers,

BW

Wareagle
08-06-2006, 04:07 PM
Bob, thanks for all of the effort in putting it together. Great job! It is bookmarked for future review!

lazlo
08-06-2006, 08:44 PM
Bob,

I just took a look at the first couple of entries.

For Acetal, you might want to say that it's co-polymer thermoplastic.
Rulon and Turcite are a large family of PTFE-embedded thermoplastics, and many don't use Acetal as the filler.
Rulon 142 and Turcite-B ("Slydway")are the variants used for box ways, and the vendors are very secretive about their chemical composition. Rulon 142 is bronze-filled. Turcite-B mostly likely is as well, but the product literature doesn't say.

For Acme screw, you might want to mention that it's a 29° trapezoidal thread form, to distinguish it from the common 60° V-thread Unified Thread Form. Acme screws also can have efficiencies up to 85%, which is higher than many rolled ballscrews. The efficiency depends on the lead and number of starts (both of which influence the helix angle), the material of the nut, and whether the screw is ground or machined.

Good idea, and a great start!

Cheers,

Robert

Evan
08-06-2006, 09:15 PM
Acetal can be either homopolymer (Delrin) or copolymer (many other brands) with slightly different properties. Homopolymer is a bit stronger but copolymer is much easier to reenforce with additives.