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Frank Downey
08-09-2006, 12:11 PM
I've been thinking about some lit. for reference in the shop.I have some books
but always would like to get some more.I was looking at the bedside reader or some cd-roms. what is the better of them and where can I find them?:confused:

pcarpenter
08-09-2006, 12:17 PM
I have the 2nd Bedside reader. It is just that and not so much a reference book. I look forward to getting the rest of the series. Guy Lautard's web site is one source. I see them in the Enco sales flyers sometimes too. The set of three is the cheapest way to go.
Paul

bdarin
08-09-2006, 03:22 PM
I have all 3 bedside readers....lots of cool stuff in there. Recommend them highly.

gunsmither
08-09-2006, 05:19 PM
I have all 3 bedside readers....lots of cool stuff in there. Recommend them highly.

I concur wholeheartedly! Excellent books, and Guy is one heck of a nice guy to deal with. ;)

His latest CD is also very interesting, with some particularly good photo's of some interesting projects, with his Hardinge lathe in the background. All his stuff is well worth the price. Give him a try, I believe you'll like his stuff. Joe

Frank Downey
08-09-2006, 05:31 PM
If you kind guys would tell me how to recieve the cd i would very much like to
get it.no matter how much you think you know you can never have enough
of reference books.:p

BobWarfield
08-09-2006, 05:42 PM
If you kind guys would tell me how to recieve the cd i would very much like to
get it.no matter how much you think you know you can never have enough
of reference books.:p

Nothing could be easier:

http://www.lautard.com/

I will second the notion that they are great books.

While on this topic, I highly recommend the book Machine Shop Trade Secrets as well. I think the density of useful information to entertaining information is higher than Lautard's works. In that sense, it is more of a benchside reader (mine is sitting down there as we speak) than a bedside reader.

OTOH, Lautard's recommendation that the Brownells Kinks books are great has left me a bit cold after going through the first one. It seemed very apropos to gunsmithing and very light on things useful in a more general setting. IMHO, not worth the cost unless you like gun work.

Best,

BW

TECHSHOP
08-09-2006, 09:07 PM
I have all the books mentioned, the three Bedside readers, the four Brownells, and Machine Shop Trade Secrets.

The Bedside readers are interesting, and when I reread them I have always found something that I had overlooked (or maybe just forgotten about).

The Brownells Kinks book cover a span of decades (about 4, IIRC) and can be a bit "dated" in their wording, references, etc. I find them all interesting, but then I am a Brownells "loyalist" and will do biz with them, even when they are not the "lowest price" on an item.

Maybe I am judging it a little harshly, Machine Shop Trade Secrets is a slight disappointment. I haven't been able to identify exactly why, maybe it is the "new style" of all picture and few words. Like so many "books" published in the last few years it feels "rushed and hyped" for the quick money. I feel that it is more a collection of "oh yea" reminders, nothing covered in any depth, but just enough to get the "newbie" into trouble. The few projects in the back seem "stuck on" as an afterthought. But I haven't "studied" them enough to see if the are "possible as drawn".

flatlander
08-09-2006, 10:07 PM
My background is farming/ranching for the past 41yrs., with strong interests in shooting & flying. I have zilch technical training as a machinist, but my shooting interests lead me to purchase a new lathe & vertical mill over the past two years, mainly with the idea of gunsmithing in mind.

I got a copy of John Hinnant's book on barreling, Brownell's 1st Kinks, and Guy L.'s 1st BSR, all several years before purchasing the machines. Over the past two years, I've added Steve Acker's "Gunsmith Machinest", the other two BSRs, the 2nd Kinks, and Machine Shop Trade Secrets. I don't feel I've wasted as much as a penny with any of these books - but then, as I said, I've had absolutely no training as a machinist, so every piece of reading that helps clear up some of the mystery gets good reviews from me.

HTRN
08-09-2006, 10:36 PM
The Brownells Kinks book cover a span of decades (about 4, IIRC) and can be a bit "dated" in their wording, references, etc. I find them all interesting, but then I am a Brownells "loyalist" and will do biz with them, even when they are not the "lowest price" on an item.

That made soda come out my nose - Brownell's, though I love them dearly, is one of the most expensive places around. They're the first retailer I found that was more expensive than MSC for the exact same item.


HTRN

BobWarfield
08-10-2006, 10:42 AM
My background is farming/ranching for the past 41yrs., with strong interests in shooting & flying. I have zilch technical training as a machinist, but my shooting interests lead me to purchase a new lathe & vertical mill over the past two years, mainly with the idea of gunsmithing in mind.

I got a copy of John Hinnant's book on barreling, Brownell's 1st Kinks, and Guy L.'s 1st BSR, all several years before purchasing the machines. Over the past two years, I've added Steve Acker's "Gunsmith Machinest", the other two BSRs, the 2nd Kinks, and Machine Shop Trade Secrets. I don't feel I've wasted as much as a penny with any of these books - but then, as I said, I've had absolutely no training as a machinist, so every piece of reading that helps clear up some of the mystery gets good reviews from me.

Flatlander, I agree, the Steve Acker gunsmithing book is very interesting. BTW, I do like guns, and do a little gunsmithing. The nice thing about the Acker book, is I think a non-gunsmith could get a lot out of it too. It's a set of very nicely written step-by-steps that teach a bit about machining along the way.

Machine Shop Trade Secrets is definitely a hints book, not a projects book. Like most hints books, each on is very short and pithy. What's the most efficient way to set up a rotab on the mill? Is it faster to turn or face on the lathe when a lot has to be faced off to reach a given length? Should I prefer positive rake or negative rake tooling? What's the quickest and easiest way to square a block or deburr a part?

Best,

BW

lazlo
08-12-2006, 10:34 PM
Maybe I am judging it a little harshly, Machine Shop Trade Secrets is a slight disappointment. I haven't been able to identify exactly why, maybe it is the "new style" of all picture and few words. Like so many "books" published in the last few years it feels "rushed and hyped" for the quick money. I feel that it is more a collection of "oh yea" reminders, nothing covered in any depth, but just enough to get the "newbie" into trouble.

I was disappointed with Machine Shop Trade Secrets as well, especially since he (or the publishers) plugged hyped reviews on Frank Hoose's site, Nick Carter's site, many of the Yahoo HSM groups...

I'm certainly no world-class machinist, but most of the tips were just so obvious that I was kicking myself for spending $40 on it:

"Full width cuts are the fastest way to clean up a surface"
"Level your lathe for a truer cut"
"Cut shafts precisely by lining up the tailstock"
"Never assume a head is trammed"
"Use short end mills whenever possible"
"Leave small amounts of material for reaming"
"Use Scotchbrite to remove rust & corrosion"
"When using a cutter that's wider than the material being cut, take the widest cut possible"

These really, really basic tips are intermixed with expensive tool recommendations that are really unnecessary for the home shop, like recommending a Wahlstrom chuck so you can change drills without stopping the spindle, or recommending a Holdridge Radii cutter for turning spheres.

Personally, I thought the Bedside Readers were a whole lot more bang for the buck -- very practical, not completely obvious tips that rely heavily on building your own tools and fixtures.