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wierdscience
08-11-2006, 12:07 AM
Stumbled onto this-

http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/hite/furnacepics.html

Your Old Dog
08-11-2006, 07:43 AM
This guy is ambitious !!

Wonder if he plans on a heat shield for the compressor or is he gonna try for more ppi out of it :D At first glance I thought it was a propane tank.

Weston Bye
08-11-2006, 08:00 AM
Looks like a propane tank to me. And a pretty energetic blower too. Nice setup. I would shield the tank too, though.

On second thought, at high use rate, propane tanks frost up due to evaporation and the delivery slows down. A little warming might help.

Wes

Alistair Hosie
08-11-2006, 09:00 AM
Why go to all that trouble a commercial small electric furnace with a pyrometer can be had second hand all the time on ebay, look under dental .These are spot on for the job in hand and are much safer than making your own I wonder why people do it Alistair

wierdscience
08-11-2006, 10:51 AM
Why go to all that trouble a commercial small electric furnace with a pyrometer can be had second hand all the time on ebay, look under dental .These are spot on for the job in hand and are much safer than making your own I wonder why people do it Alistair

It's a melting furnace for going from scrapmetal to a casting.I have seen a ceramic kiln used for melting,but it would take a pretty good sized dental over to melt 20lbs of aluminum.

I noticed the proximity of the propane tank too,but the kind of insulation he has I bet it doesn't get very warm at all.
I would use a heat shield too thou,glob of molten brass in the wrong place.....

Orrin
08-11-2006, 12:53 PM
The unit has casters to allow wheeling it to a convenient location for casting. Those little wheels demand a hard surface (concrete?) to roll upon. Hmmm. One should never do foundry work on a concrete surface. I wonder if the person using this rig bothers having a dry sand surface under his casting operation.

Orrin

agrip
08-11-2006, 02:11 PM
Notice the shovel etc on the wall. I expect plenty of sand is around there someplace, and the concrete allows other projects a certain convenience.

At a stiff fuel rate the LPG bottle might well need a bit of radiation to stave off an ice blanket.
Otherwise a sheet of something in between takes care of too much heat to the bottle.

Thanks for the pix. Ag

Wirecutter
08-11-2006, 02:21 PM
One should never do foundry work on a concrete surface.
Orrin
Ok, dumb question of the day: Is this because of the risk of having molten metal sloshing everywhere in the event of a spill? Also, what surface should be used? Sand? Thanks in advance.

-Mark

tattoomike68
08-11-2006, 02:45 PM
Ok, dumb question of the day: Is this because of the risk of having molten metal sloshing everywhere in the event of a spill? Also, what surface should be used? Sand? Thanks in advance.

-Mark

The foundry I worked at would cast 32 ton an hour. The pouring deck was a steel deck with tracks for the molds that sat on rolling carts. , there was always a layer of sand on the deck from the weight changers pulling jackets off the molds. extra sand was pushed off the far end of the deck into the shake out table.

lbender
08-11-2006, 03:21 PM
QUOTE: "Ok, dumb question of the day: Is this because of the risk of having molten metal sloshing everywhere in the event of a spill? Also, what surface should be used? Sand?"

Concrete contains water. In case of a spill, the concrete tends to explode and splatter molten metal in a wide radius. Steel decking, fire brick, sand, packed earth, wood blocks, and castable refractories all make safer pouring floors.

CCWKen
08-11-2006, 03:33 PM
I like it but it looks too purdy to use. ;)

Ditto on the sand floor. For safe home/shop use, a dry sand tray is a good safety item. It's not to bad with aluminum or other lower melting metals but molten steel and iron drops of any substantial quantity will explode concrete like dynamite. The rest of the molten puddle will be spread with it. If you're in a home garage and still alive, dial 911 because the place will be in flames.

NEVER work over damp ground or even grass. Molten metals turn the moisture into steam in a fraction of a second with explosive results. And for God's sake, don't drip sweat into it either.

wierdscience
08-11-2006, 09:47 PM
That's the perfect thing to do with spent foundry sand,break it up and cover the floor with it.

Elninio
08-11-2006, 11:51 PM
look how at how the size of his shop! i bet he could build boats in there

Too_Many_Tools
08-12-2006, 12:13 AM
Does anyone else have PICTURES of foundries on carts?

How about PICTURES of portable foundries?

I have a Johnson foundry that I would like to mount on a cart with flasks and acccesories and I am looking for ideas.

I also plan on mounting a 100 gal LP tank on a separate cart so the entire foundry setup is portable.

Thanks

TMT