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Alistair Hosie
08-11-2006, 05:24 AM
Hi simple question should be for Evan anyway.I have a computer upstairs with windows xp and aol connection through broadband with broadband modem not internal modem.I bought my wife a computer downstairs and want her to get accesss to the internet local guys says doing so is not easy to set up with a wireless router and I will need one dedicated to aol.The other local guy says these things don't work to well through brick walls and I will need to run cables with a different router I simply want her to have instant internet how do I do it ?Alistair

torker
08-11-2006, 08:23 AM
Alisair, We just hooked up a router setup in the motel we run.
Cost about $150 Cnd.
I put the antenae just outside the door and it broadcasts to all 40 rooms.
The four rooms around the corner get a slightly weaker signal but the people using it are ok with it.
The place has a large courtyard in the middle and is surrounded by the rooms in a U shape.
The back rooms are 150 feet away from the antenae and the whole building is insulated cinder block construction.
Before we started using a password we even had people sitting out in the parking lot using the wireless.
One thing I did find was you can't add to the length of the antenae wire.
Or so all the techs in town told me. Something about bastard connectors.
I think they just didn't want to bother with bringing me in a couple of cheap connectors.
I'm curious to see what Evan says.
Ruiss

Norman Atkinson
08-11-2006, 08:53 AM
Again, I would appreciate Evan's views but****

Regarding AOL or another server, that should not be a problem.
Either your router will pick up AOL or you can manually put the settings in.

Frankly, that is the easy bit.

The bit which is difficult is getting the signal between the box bit and the computers. Distances and obstructions are as already advised by your local experts.

I'm running a Belkin 54G for what it is worth.

Good Luck

Norm

Rustybolt
08-11-2006, 09:31 AM
Ours is in the basement of our two story house. We have computers in just about eveery room and never had any problems. We got the package from comcast.There is also a dedicated Apple wireless router.

Alistair Hosie
08-11-2006, 12:10 PM
I looked up ebay Uk there are thousands to choose from,They want about £70 to 80 pounds here for a wireless one locally in Glasgow I could get it cheaper but on ebay they go from £12 what's the catch.Could you Norm if possible point out a goody on ebay regardless of price that will do the job and let me see it so as I know which ones to avoid.regardsAlistair

Wirecutter
08-11-2006, 12:39 PM
One thing I did find was you can't add to the length of the antenae wire.
Or so all the techs in town told me. Something about bastard connectors.
I think they just didn't want to bother with bringing me in a couple of cheap connectors.
Ruiss
Russ -
At the ISM wireless frequencies, lengthening the antenna wire runs the risk of significant signal loss, first of all. Second, they are bastard connectors. All the wireless antenna connections I've seen (Cisco, Intel, Netgear, Zyxel, Linksys, etc) have antenna connectors that look like standard connectors at first glance. I believe they call them "reverse polarity" RF connectors, such as "reverse polarity BNC". A "reverse polarity" BNC plug has the "female" outer shell, but instead of having a male center conductor, like normal BNC, it's a female center, too. It's easier to understand the explaination if you see the two side by side. Anyway, I've seen this done with at least 5 "standard" RF connectors used in wireless networking boxes.

These odd connectors were really hard to get when I first got some a few years ago. It's probably not as bad now, but it could still be a real PITA.

Also, and IMHO, wireless "security" isn't. It's best compared to latching the gate to keep strangers out of your yard, or posting a "no trespassing" sign. Of course, if you value your privacy and financial info, you're not conducting internet commerce over a wireless network, right? :D

Good on you for providing the convenience to your guests, though, Russ. Despite the limitations, wireless connectivity is a nice thing to have when on the road. It's not terribly hard to provide to customers, and if done right, is a nice little perk.

-Mark

Norman Atkinson
08-11-2006, 01:03 PM
Alistair,

At the risk of being blown up by the experts, I think that the latest spec.for this sort of thing is 802.11G. So there must be stuff on E-Bay which is earlier. So, I am reluctant to stick my neck out.

What you need is a router to to the 54G spec and compatible wireless pickups to go into the motherboard from the back of the computer. A sort of duck's arse aerial to pick up the signal. Laptops generally have a card that goes into a slot- which does the same thing.

Now, I ran into a heap of trouble with an earlier Linksis set up. Mine fell to bits by overheating but my son blamed the twit who will name him as a beneficiary in his will. I have the Link thing and frankly, haven't used it since the Belkin was fitted.

It may sound defeatist but I would await Evan emerging and his usual expertise. I suspect that you are in a biggish sort of older house and the units may be some distance apart.Mine is in a four bedroom bungalow and there is a hike for this old fart. I would suspect that even a new set from a direct computer shop in Glasgow and attempting to DIY may not be the wise answer.

I could bundle my old gubbins up and post it to you- but why spoil a good friendship?

Evan, comments please?

Norm

Evan
08-11-2006, 02:32 PM
Well, first it shouldn't matter what service is being used. Connect the LAN ouput of the modem to the wireless router and away it goes. You need a wireless card for each computer if it isn't directly cabled to the router. Most laptops have wireless built in. Follow the directions to access the router and set up an encrypted password protected network. Once that is done the computers on wireless with XP will automatically detect the signal and ask you to log in. That only needs to be done once. If you are using AOL you will need to install the AOL browser on each computer.

The signal will go through a few walls just fine as long as they aren't metal.

As for the connectors, there are several types in use depending on the manufacturer. Many are using SMA which is an old standard for miniature coaxial adapters and should be available. However, some use reverse SMA as noted above and those are harder to find. That's why I made one for my antenna. They can be ordered. The wireless system I am using now is the Buffalo Turbo G High Power and it uses reverse SMA connectors. They have a line of antennas available with cables of various lengths. You can get everything from a relatively cheap flat patch antenna that has no extension cable to multi element weatherproof yagis to go on the roof. The fancier antennas cost more than the router but will give much increased range at the expense of omnidirectional coverage.

The most common connector for third party antennas is the standard N connector. To cable to that you need an SMA to N pigtail or whatever matches the antenna connector on your router. The manufacturer specs for your router should say what connector type it uses. All of this stuff is widely available online. Once you figure out what sort of connector the router uses then search Google for "SMA pigtail price" or whatever your type is.

BTW, when looking for items for sale online with Google including the search term "price" makes it a lot easier to find things.

torker
08-11-2006, 03:34 PM
Mark...exactly as you say. The techie showed me the difference in the connectors. They are a weird breed alright.
If I'm not mistaken...to add length to such an antenae, it needs to be tuned the same as a CB unit.
Our other alternative is to spend almost $3000 for a hi-power setup that would overcome the minor problems we have. Not worth it IMO.
NO...we don't do any business over the internet.


Russ -
At the ISM wireless frequencies, lengthening the antenna wire runs the risk of significant signal loss, first of all. Second, they are bastard connectors. All the wireless antenna connections I've seen (Cisco, Intel, Netgear, Zyxel, Linksys, etc) have antenna connectors that look like standard connectors at first glance. I believe they call them "reverse polarity" RF connectors, such as "reverse polarity BNC". A "reverse polarity" BNC plug has the "female" outer shell, but instead of having a male center conductor, like normal BNC, it's a female center, too. It's easier to understand the explaination if you see the two side by side. Anyway, I've seen this done with at least 5 "standard" RF connectors used in wireless networking boxes.

These odd connectors were really hard to get when I first got some a few years ago. It's probably not as bad now, but it could still be a real PITA.

Also, and IMHO, wireless "security" isn't. It's best compared to latching the gate to keep strangers out of your yard, or posting a "no trespassing" sign. Of course, if you value your privacy and financial info, you're not conducting internet commerce over a wireless network, right? :D

Good on you for providing the convenience to your guests, though, Russ. Despite the limitations, wireless connectivity is a nice thing to have when on the road. It's not terribly hard to provide to customers, and if done right, is a nice little perk.

-Mark

HTRN
08-11-2006, 03:38 PM
The real reason you shouldn't run extension cables is because of signal antenuation in the wire. I think(but I'm not sure) that the general recommendation is not to run a cable more than 3 meters between the antenna and signal source. There is cable where you can do longer runs, but the cost of it is obscene - a coupla bucks a foot.

WHat you may want to try is building a panel array (http://www.hyperlinktech.com/web/sectorized_omni_quad_array.php) using this page (http://www.trevormarshall.com/waveguides.htm) as a guide for making each sector.(zip file (http://www.trevormarshall.com/wave32.zip) of the panels), then wire them all together using a bridge, you can then use something like this (http://www.routerboard.com/rb100.html) along with a miniPCI wifi card to build an access point. Mount it up close to the antenna's in an ONT box, and use PoE to power the whole shebang.

But you said everybody's getting a signal, right? Then there's no reason to go ahead and screw with it.


HTRN