PDA

View Full Version : Anyone see one of these new Sieg machines yet?



wierdscience
08-20-2006, 11:05 PM
Saw this,looks kinda neat-

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/gallery/photos.php?Qwd=./China%202006&Qif=34PICT0284.JPG&Qiv=thumbs&Qis=M

Not Seig but also neat:D

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/gallery/photos.php?Qwd=./China%202006&Qif=10PICT0108.JPG&Qiv=thumbs&Qis=M

BillH
08-21-2006, 01:34 AM
ah the multi machine thats a surface grinder, horizontal, and maybe a vertical mill as well? I am also interested.

John Stevenson
08-21-2006, 05:58 AM
No not seen one of those but to be honest I can't see it being a lot of good.
Grinders have no place being bagged up with other machine tools.

Another thing is these machines are built to a price and do a reasonable job.
Making a multi purpose machine needs a lot of thought and not just an add on to what's there.
Horizontal mills require larger amounts of power than vertical and at a lower speed.

These machine rely on a cheap DC variable speed drive which is barely adequate for the original design of vertical machine let along a horizontal spindle requiring more torque at the end of the range it has a problem reaching.

I did get one of these from the Bristol Show I have just attended.
http://www.littlemachineshop.com/gallery/photos.php?Qwd=./China%202006&Qif=34PICT0289.JPG&Qiv=thumbs&Qis=M

A C0 lathe, complete with key chain :D
Don't laugh but I have a use for this, every month I have to make about 12 very small copper rivets with a special shape.
At the moment I use a small Jacobs chuck in a collet but still have trouble getting this small on my 12 and 14" lathes.
This will come in very handy. Mount it on a piece of 4" angle, put it in the vise, do the job required and put it away in a drawer or cupboard.

I can see the model car and RC flyers taking this to meetings and running it off a 12v inverter for running repairs.

.

wierdscience
08-21-2006, 10:07 AM
No not seen one of those but to be honest I can't see it being a lot of good.
Grinders have no place being bagged up with other machine tools.

Another thing is these machines are built to a price and do a reasonable job.
Making a multi purpose machine needs a lot of thought and not just an add on to what's there.
Horizontal mills require larger amounts of power than vertical and at a lower speed.

These machine rely on a cheap DC variable speed drive which is barely adequate for the original design of vertical machine let along a horizontal spindle requiring more torque at the end of the range it has a problem reaching.

I did get one of these from the Bristol Show I have just attended.
http://www.littlemachineshop.com/gallery/photos.php?Qwd=./China%202006&Qif=34PICT0289.JPG&Qiv=thumbs&Qis=M

A C0 lathe, complete with key chain :D
Don't laugh but I have a use for this, every month I have to make about 12 very small copper rivets with a special shape.
At the moment I use a small Jacobs chuck in a collet but still have trouble getting this small on my 12 and 14" lathes.
This will come in very handy. Mount it on a piece of 4" angle, put it in the vise, do the job required and put it away in a drawer or cupboard.

I can see the model car and RC flyers taking this to meetings and running it off a 12v inverter for running repairs.

.

A CNC lathe for making custom sewing needles:D

I don't like the grinder idea either,but the h/v feature is nice and it is after all a hobby machine for model making etc.

I also heard there is a chance that it will have an AC motor and inverter drive which if done right would be a vast improvement.

How is the x3 convert doing anyway,made and chips yet?

John Stevenson
08-21-2006, 10:28 AM
A CNC lathe for making custom sewing needles:D

I don't like the grinder idea either,but the h/v feature is nice and it is after all a hobby machine for model making etc.

I also heard there is a chance that it will have an AC motor and inverter drive which if done right would be a vast improvement.

How is the x3 convert doing anyway,made and chips yet?

Joking apart I have a stack of new type17 motors that would fit nicely on this.
Plugged it in this morning to try it and I'm impressed by it.
Lets face it, it's not an industrial machine and lacks finesse so I started out on a bit of brass bar which it soon turned to chips and had more grunt than expected.

Tried a bit of 20mm steel bar with the centre in for support, By hand feed and listing to the motor you can take 1mm cuts [ 0.040" ] taking 2mm off the diameter in one pass which, to be honest, is more than I expected.

With the power feed, which is just an 'O' ring driven single speed worm box with clutch, it will take 1mm off the diameter per pass.
No run out at all over a 5" length.

The X3 CNC went down to the Bristol Show at the weekend and attracted a lot of interest.
Two firm orders and some as may follow up.

There was a lot of interest in grafting the electronics side of it onto existing machines that have clunky controllers on them, may have picked two of these up as well ?

Shows are not for selling something like this over the counter but more for selling the concept for later purchase.

.

Just pleasantly surprised over the performance when compared to the only two small lathes I have ever played on, a Taig and a Sherline.

wierdscience
08-21-2006, 10:20 PM
The Taigs and Sherlines are neat little machines,but any cast iron even Chinese cast has to be an improvement over aluminum,that was the reason I bought the little x2 mill I have now.

I bought it as a "kit" machine (some re-engineering required) and am just about finished making parts for it.

I agree the best use for shows it to set the hook for later sales.Company I used to work for always did that,went to a show one weekend and the following three or four weeks got busy.

So what did the little lathe cost you,and just how big over all is it?

nheng
08-21-2006, 10:29 PM
... any cast iron even Chinese cast has to be an improvement over aluminum,that was the reason I bought the little x2 mill I have now

I agree completely. That's why I have a Sherline lathe and stopped short of a Sherline mill. I think the Sherline is better suited for even smaller work than the Asian mini lathes but at much higher spindle speeds. Den

lazlo
08-21-2006, 11:42 PM
Saw this,looks kinda neat-

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/gallery/photos.php?Qwd=./China%202006&Qif=34PICT0284.JPG&Qiv=thumbs&Qis=M


Looks like that's a prototype they made by chopping up an X3 or a BF-20 and building a new spindle head for it.

Feeding a part back and forth under the grinding wheel with the little X3 handwheels doesn't seem like a lot of fun to me ;)

wierdscience
08-21-2006, 11:55 PM
Feeding a part back and forth under the grinding wheel with the little X3 handwheels doesn't seem like a lot of fun to me ;)

LOL,I'll second that:D

Just the H/V mill combo sounds good,but the H/V mill/grinder combo sounds like a car/motorcycle/cemet mixer,even thou Yugo tried it,that doesn't mean it should be attempted:D:D