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thistle
08-21-2006, 04:29 PM
Hugh mans thread introducing himself has got me wondering ,

who here owns a boat, or builds boats , works on boats , ect?

I work on boats , I work on the broken bits of boats( to fix), I build the occasional boat (5 sofar) , i have a few designs on the burner, I own a couple of boats.

so its not too ot a topic yes i use most of my tools to make and repair parts on my and other boats , and if i ever get my foundry going will cast bits as well.

lynnl
08-21-2006, 04:37 PM
Well I own a fishing boat (aluminum).
But I subscribe to Wooden Boat, and have always wanted to build some wooden boats.
Like they say, "there's just something about messing around with a boat"!

thistle
08-21-2006, 05:15 PM
so on the" practical it might happen soon"to do list-

1 skin on frame greenland kayak
2 traditional sailing dingy small enough for my daughter to grow into
3 17 foot garvey


the more impractical to do list-

steam launch

gundog
08-21-2006, 05:40 PM
I have a hole in the water in which to throw my money. 21' offshore aluminum boat and I have a small business making boat parts.
GD

jud
08-21-2006, 05:43 PM
I piddle in a machine shop that fixes props. I say piddle because payment for my work is in kind. I sand, buff and weld props that have been straightened and tweaked. I work mostly with stainless props but we also do aluminum. I usually only go out once or twice a week. The man that does the work can make props that are worthless look like new.

My payment is knowledge from helping the gentleman and access to the machines when I need it.

Mike P
08-21-2006, 06:02 PM
I built a Glen-L 14 when I was in high school. 14' plywood sloop.

I raced Thistles (17' 3 person sloops) for years and years during/after college. Also worked for the builder for a summer. Laying up glass hulls, woodwork, repairs, hardware installation, etc...

I owned and raced Flying Scots (19' 3 person sloop) for a couple years.

I owned and raced Highlanders (20' 3 person sloop) for 10 years. Won a National Championship in '96 and crewed for my buddy when he won in '98.

All three class boats were designed by Sandy Douglass.

Now I just race about one regatta a year. Just beat the current Highlander National Champion and runner-up last weekend in our local regatta.

Timewarp
08-21-2006, 06:05 PM
Steel boat??

http://img508.imageshack.us/img508/1514/aug06zw2.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Taken this morning.

Pablo

John R
08-21-2006, 06:57 PM
I too am a boat lover. I built a 26 ft Sharpy ketch in wood which lost a battle with a hurricane...then I built a 32 ft steel Tahiti ketch which I still sail around the Gulf the East and West coasts of Florida and the Bahamas. When you own a boat its nice to also own a machine shop. I started a steam boat project...engine ,boiler and feed pump complete but hurricane Katrina destroyed the engine and boiler along with my shop. On the other hand my new shop is almost complete.
John R

Rustybolt
08-21-2006, 07:04 PM
I built a 17 ft 'stripper' canoe awhile ago. The next wooden boat I want to build is a 14 ft drift boat.

topct
08-21-2006, 07:05 PM
As a former member of the US Coast Guard all I'm going to say is please have on hand or be wearing the proper flotation devices. :D

Cool stuff and very HSM.

hughman
08-21-2006, 07:32 PM
Ahem...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid210/p881af922b54b8f06befab74903fbebaf/edde067d.jpg

Now here's a project for the ambitious.... :p


Actually this is the remains of a 19th C. Asa Thompson skiff, of New Bedford MA. It's value rests solely in the original hardware for someone wanting to biuld a new one from available plans. (offered free to the determined...;) )

jmm360
08-21-2006, 07:41 PM
Break
Out
Another
Thousand
:D

Evan
08-21-2006, 08:09 PM
Years back I designed and built a small dingy with an inboard 3 1/2 horse engine. We used it for putting around on the fairly large lake where we built our cabin. It was all wood and plywood and worked out really well.

Since then I was involved with the local sea cadets and taught seamanship and sailing. I have an 18 foot aluminum Grumman canoe with a sloop rig that I designed and built. That also works well and was great for introducing the new cadets to sailing. For about six or seven years I was the official fixer of boats for the local cadet corps and had about 6 of them parked in my yard, including two 29ft whalers. The whalers are fiberglass and are a standard gaff rig training vessel for the cadets. They are almost impossible to capsize and are actually old converted lifeboats.

Every year we would have the annual 3 day outing to one of the larger lakes near here and it was my job for three days to try and keep everything in floating and functioning condition. This was a major challenge and I really had to think about what tools and supplies to bring. I would usually be busy all day long each day making repairs as the kids broke stuff in just about any way you can imagine.

It could be anything from running a whaler aground and bending the aluminum center board to launching one of the smaller sailboats without the drain plug in. That one nearly went to the bottom. A 14 foot sail boat with fiberglass hull sure does weigh a lot when the double hull is full of water.

Whenever I got caught up on the repairs I would take out the zodiac and do running transfers of the kids from one boat to another so they all got a turn without having to come back in to shore. In all it was a lot of fun but like a lot of volunteer activities you eventually get burned out with the demands on your time. I did quite a bit of shop work on the boats at my place including things like making new rudders of laminated oak and plywood for the whalers, stripping and repainting the trailers and many other repairs to the various boats.

The only boat I have now is my canoe. If we still lived on Vancouver Island you can bet I would have something and that is the one thing I miss the most. We used to live at a marina there and that was one of the nicest places we ever lived. I don't mind a bit the sound of the lines on the sailboats when they are slatting on the mast in a breeze. It's like music.

john hobdeclipe
08-21-2006, 08:48 PM
Well, I guess our little store-bought polyethylene 9.5 foot kayaks aren't very impressive, but my wife & I sure enjoy our Sundays on the lake, paddling into one wind and drifting with another.

charlie coghill
08-21-2006, 08:51 PM
This is my hole in the water. It is cheep to operate it runs on steam and any wood can be fuel.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/kcprecision/TheSimonWillardcaptainedbyCharlieCo.jpg

The hull is a liberty ship life boat. The engine was built from casting and I welded up the boiler under the guidense of a friend that has built a good number of boilers. The boiler works at 125#.

CCWKen
08-21-2006, 09:11 PM
Hey Charlie, the bildge pump sure looks like it's putting out a lot of water! :eek: Nice looking anyway though.

I had a 20' Four Winns I/O when I lived up on the North Coast. I really enjoyed that boat. Fishing, skiing, camping. Running up to Put-in-bay and watching all the nude chicks sun bathe. (Got even better after dark) Oh yeah, those were the days. :D (WBB-2830 / "Perfect Fit")

Now I'm 150 miles from the Gulf Coast and 75 miles from the nearest boating lake. Looks like sun baked desert around here now but I've got money in the bank. ;)

wierdscience
08-21-2006, 09:22 PM
Never owned a boat,but have worked on and made parts for many.There is always somebody wanting a shaft,or a trawl winch or some such.

The smallest boat I made parts for was a 16' aluminum that an old man converted to a Wisconsin powered inboard,that was fun.

The prettiest was a 1937? 38' Criscraft,georgeous boat still had the original engine and gear.

The biggest was a 600ton trawler leased out to the company that supplys Starkist,I will never eat tuna out of a can again:eek:two days down under the lower decks welding hydraulic lines witht he constant smell of fish guys rotting in the breeze:D

BillH
08-21-2006, 09:42 PM
I have a Perception Carolina 15.5 kayak, with rudder, it needs a rudder, wont track straight without it.
Dad has a Sylvan 16ft aluminum boat that weighs about 600lbs, your standard walk thru windshield bowrider. Have a Honda 50hp outboard. It is GREAT on gas. However if we had to do it over again, would of gotten the 60hp Yamaha 4 stroke. 1 more cylinder, smoother, and better console controls. Mercury 4 strokes are good as they use a Yamaha engine block but made in Mexico, so a cheaper Yamaha basically.

btr-cj
08-21-2006, 09:42 PM
18 Foot BayHawk.

Fish around Grand Isle along the cost of Louisiana.

Had to replace the transom a couple years ago. Learned a bit about laying fiberglass.


C.J.

PolskiFran
08-21-2006, 09:50 PM
My boat is a 1957(?) Luger. Painted white, with Beacon Red and varnished cowl and trim. It was purchaced as a kit from Luger Marine through an ad in Popular Mechanics Magazine. It was assembled by my dad and uncles. It has a 1958 Evinrude Fleetwin 7 1/2 hp. outboard (the original sparkplugs are still in the engine) that runs like a champ. It even has a flip-up licence plate holder with the 1960 boat plates still attached. The trailer that it sits on is home built by my dad and uncles from plans in a 1948 issue of PM, Using a front axle from a 1940(?) Plymouth. It still has 6.00x16" recapped tires on it.

Frank

chiphead42
08-21-2006, 10:28 PM
Hello Reading this thread reminded me that some time back, maybe 2-3 yrs., remember seeing web site where some women maybe 3 or 4, were building a steel boat, maybe 30-40 ft. At the time they were just getting started. Don't remember if it was on one of the BBs or where. Anyone know about this/have a link. Would be intereting to see progress.
Thanks for any help chiphead42

dicks42000
08-22-2006, 01:30 AM
There goes Mr. Coghill, steaming away again....At least he only needs lube oil. The fire can run on wood. Most of us have to feed ours gas or oil, or row. I'm stuck feeding the Volvo TMD diesel fuel until I sell that hole in the water & get the Stuart-Turner finished.....Then build a boiler, find a hull...retirement project???
Ah boats...literally a hole in the water to shovel money in....
Enjoy them. Kinda like having a horse.
Rick

madman
08-22-2006, 02:40 AM
I own a fixed up 14 aluminumn fishing boat homebuilt quick release quick detatch seat basea drink trays. Stainless steel and fiberglass encapsulated transom (high to fit my long shaft 4 stroke 25 horse Yamaha. Also 17.5 foot custom homebuilt collapsable kayack. Like a klepper but in some ways nicer. It was built in 1974 and as i write this email it is assembled and on my aluminumn sawhorses in my backyard. Got a oak motor mount with a honda 2 horse power 4 stroke outboard. It fits in a old supercub float plane for remote fishing trips. Beats strapping the aluminumn onto the pontoon struts and having it come loose at 2000 feet.

djd
08-23-2006, 12:37 AM
Lots of boat experts here...
Can anyone share their experiance with painting fiberglass? I'm finishing off a fiberglass repair on a 17' O'day Daysailer and want to paint it. Any recommendations? One part? Two part? Interlux? Awlgrip? Petit?

Two many choices! My main concern is long term, low maintenence. I've got the bottom paint covered, but what about above the water line, the deck and the insides?
Dennis

Guido
08-23-2006, 01:02 AM
Boating gave me two of the happiest days of me life:

1) The day I bought it, and

2) The day I -----------------------

G

Norman Atkinson
08-23-2006, 05:40 AM
Arse to the maaast?
Gybe Ho!

Norm

Millman
08-23-2006, 08:25 AM
[Can anyone share their experiance with painting fiberglass?] If you really want differing opinions, I suggest the golf cart forums. After reading those...don't really know if I will paint my cart or not. They have real fancy paintjobs, though. Oh yeah; I get about 900 miles per gallon!

thistle
08-23-2006, 08:55 AM
Lots of boat experts here...
Can anyone share their experiance with painting fiberglass? I'm finishing off a fiberglass repair on a 17' O'day Daysailer and want to paint it. Any recommendations? One part? Two part? Interlux? Awlgrip? Petit?

Two many choices! My main concern is long term, low maintenence. I've got the bottom paint covered, but what about above the water line, the deck and the insides?
Dennis

I am a big fan of single part Brightside , its specifically aimed at just what you are doing, and can be put on with a roller and foam brush with excellant results.

I usually spend theextra money and use it for machine repainting as well.

2 part poly paints such as interthane and awlgrip are a whole nother ball game giving a n excellant long lasting finish but requiring proper spray equipment , proper conditions ,protective equipment ect.
if you want a work boat finish you can roll it and tip it , but its best sprayed .

A.K. Boomer
08-23-2006, 09:05 AM
I had a Wavesport Frankenstien a Pyranha Innazone a Dagger Super Ego and a Dagger G-force, all whitewater kayaks im down to just the Super Ego now and havnt paddled it in a year mostly due to my lower back,,, these are all hardshell (plastic) boats that are very durable and take a beating in the river on rocks and such, Im hoping my inverted chair works good enough to get me in the river next spring melt if not only just to surf, boats are great but a WW kayak can also turn into a torture chamber of sorts, they are very restrictive and work the daylights out of your lower back, the problem is you end up having so much fun that you forget about this --- till the next day...

LastOldDog
08-23-2006, 05:23 PM
I am a big fan of single part Brightside , its specifically aimed at just what you are doing, and can be put on with a roller and foam brush with excellant results.

I usually spend theextra money and use it for machine repainting as well.

2 part poly paints such as interthane and awlgrip are a whole nother ball game giving a n excellant long lasting finish but requiring proper spray equipment , proper conditions ,protective equipment ect.
if you want a work boat finish you can roll it and tip it , but its best sprayed .

Thisle, great competitive class. Good on ya.

I agree with rolling and tipping off, the intended use of the power boat is the prime influence in the decision making. If one were refinishing a bass boat running 50kt for an hour each way, the bottom is a factor. Otherwise the rolled out-of-the-can bottom protection is fine, since there is no need to long-board and polish the surface.

Our boats are stored on the hard til race day. In a series, we will dock but the divers scrub the hull each race day morning. We are racers, not algae farmers.

Lloyd

thistle
08-24-2006, 11:27 AM
time warp , thats a hell of a project you have there can you tell more?

thistle
08-24-2006, 11:37 AM
while I am here heres some of my previous boat prjects
14 foot garvey

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/mudskipper/048acec8.jpg

a pond yacht
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/mudskipper/pondyacht.jpg

my skinny launch
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/mudskipper/P1010062.jpg

a cat
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/mudskipper/Boat/boat.jpg

Evan
08-24-2006, 01:17 PM
This is the only one I ever built from scratch but it was a lot of fun. I designed it myself and built it with wood ribs and plywood with the seams sealed with fiberglass drywall tape. It was about 10 feet long

It had a 3 1/2 hp briggs inboard with a 5" prop running on a shaft and housing I built. It really worked well and was really stable.

That's me and my kids when they were young. You can get an idea how old this pic is by the fact that both of those "kids" are parents now....

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/boat1.jpg

Rumbledoll
08-24-2006, 05:18 PM
I'll second the thoughts on Brightsider. I run a reasonably large (40 man) repair yard and new construction business for a real job. Awlgrip is great, but: It is best applied by spray, and at that by a painter familiar with it. I've had a number of hot-shot car painters come in looking for a job, and make a hash of it. Too dry, there's no shine, lot's of orange peel, too wet, it falls off of the boat. It's lots easier to spray in a booth, with heated air flow across the surface, also keep in mind that isocyanate is really not good for you - we DON"T let people spray without a suit and supplied air system.

Brightside is pretty easy; prime and sand until you are happy, be sure to thin the paint about 10-20% or so, the brush marks will flow out a lot easier. It may take three coats to cover, but they go on easy. Painting goes better with two people, one rolls on the paint with a very thin foam roller - the West system ones work fine - his aim is to apply a thin uniform coating of paint to the surface. The other guy follows right at his elbow, "Tipping Off" the roller air bubbles and marks with long sweeping horizontal strokes. Should only take about 10-15 minutes to do one side, one coat - faster is better.

One other option - If the old gel-coat is just chalked up and faded, but the color is uniform, you can simply dry sand it with 320, and spray an automotive clear-coat. Not perfect, but quick and cheap, and lasts for a good 6 years or so - but don't do below the waterline - it will blister.

Timewarp
08-24-2006, 08:18 PM
Thistle, boat is about 60 ft long. Origami style construction. Patterns are cut out on floppy plates then pulled into shape. A model was made out of sheet metal, then scaled it up. Rig will be 3 masted junk. Been working on it about 4.5 yrs.
Paul