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View Full Version : Need any radioactive ore/isotopes or misc. items than this sites for you



PTSideshow
09-13-2006, 05:11 PM
Here is a a site for all your radioactive needs. Man you can get anything on the web. They do sell meteorites, and other stuff.www.unitednuclear.com :D

Evan
09-13-2006, 05:46 PM
You don't want to be on their list of customers, trust me.

PTSideshow
09-13-2006, 06:20 PM
you mean the knocking at the door in the middle of the night. or your house starts to glow
:D

Evan
09-13-2006, 06:27 PM
I mean that Bob Lazar, the guy that that owns it is a nut job of the first water and has already been raided at least once by the government. If you don't want to end up on a very bad list to be on then stay clear.

PTSideshow
09-13-2006, 06:29 PM
good to know:D Is he that guy that worked at area 51 and was on TV ?

Doc Nickel
09-13-2006, 07:03 PM
Geeze Evan, is there any conspiracy theory you don't subscribe to?

Yeah, I'm sure being on a customer list for having bought a coffee mug (http://www.unitednuclear.com/mugs.htm) or a meteorite (http://www.unitednuclear.com/meteorites.htm) will automatically get you on some NSA blacklist of "persons of interest to watch" and shoot you to the top of the IRS "proctological-level audit list.

Give me a break.

Doc.

topct
09-13-2006, 07:16 PM
http://www.unitednuclear.com/about.htm

Evan
09-13-2006, 07:37 PM
Doc,

I suggest you do a little reading on Bob Lazar before you jump to conclusions.




United Nuclear got its computers back a few days after they were hauled away, and three years passed before Lazar and White heard from the authorities again. This spring, the couple was charged with violating the Federal Hazardous Substances Act and shipping restricted chemicals across state lines. If convicted, Lazar and White each face a maximum penalty of 270 days in prison and a $15,000 fine.

Do you really think they didn't make copies of the hard drives?

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.06/chemistry.html

LarryinLV
09-13-2006, 08:00 PM
Hmm, IIRC, Bob Lazars main claim to fame while he was living in Las Vegas trying to push his "I worked at Area 51" story was a charge of pandering and solicitation (pimping) from his home with his "live in" girls.

I believe he claims that all his education records and all records of ever having actually worked for Los Alamos have dissappeared because the government is out to get him for revealing the existance of flying saucers.

He did build a jet powered car....but that is hardly rocket science; as we've read on these forums even motorcycle builders make jets.

Still, a guy's gotta make a living.

Doc Nickel
09-13-2006, 08:00 PM
I read about the seizure of his files months ago- But I repeat; So?

Yes, I suppose if someone had bought a selection of parts and tools and glassware that could conceivably be used to make ones' own black powder (or, perhaps more likely, cook meth or other drugs) but do you really think anyone, in any government department, is going to give a hamster's hindquarters if I bought a coffee mug with a radiation symbol on it?

Or even if I bought a chunk of Trinitite- yes, it's mildly radioactive, but has essentially zero possible nefarious purposes, and paying $50 for twenty grams of mildly radioactive rock is hardly the beginnings of a "dirty bomb" or something.

Ooh, Aerogel. Move over, Ted Kyzinski! Buy some of that and maybe some phosphorescent powder and I might as well spray-paint "Allah Akhbar! Death to America!" on my garage door. I'll get whisked off to that secret CIA prison in Belarus faster than you can say "John Walker Lindh".

Doc.

Evan
09-13-2006, 08:31 PM
Doc,

They raided him for a couple of reasons. He sells chemicals that can be used to make explosives. That isn't a popular activity with the Dept of H.S. He also pushes the regs to the limit on the stuff like isotopes. If the law allows him to sell one microcurie max that is what he sells even though .1 would do just fine. They do not like him because he is unpredictable and a nut job.

When they seized his computers there is no doubt that every single name in them was extracted and put in a database of people that have dealt with him regardless of what they bought. They aren't going to sort through the list and remove people. The government never works that way. Once you get on any sort of list like that it can have unforseen consequences such as denial of a security clearance in the future.

topct
09-13-2006, 08:39 PM
I have personally given him and Art Bell lots of money. I believe in them. They are famous and have been on the radio for a long time. That's all the proof I need.

Someones got to tell the truth and these guys are just two of those that do.

I'm taking a very expensive class in remote viewing and you can believe me when I tell you, that what they say is true. I would have picked up on that one for sure even with my limited experiance.

Bob Lazar is a good man and is just trying to make an honest living.

You would take even that away from him? What kind of world have we created for Gods sake.

Evan
09-13-2006, 09:09 PM
I have personally given him and Art Bell lots of money. I believe in them. They are famous and have been on the radio for a long time. That's all the proof I need.

Someones got to tell the truth and these guys are just two of those that do.

I'm taking a very expensive class in remote viewing and you can believe me when I tell you, that what they say is true. I would have picked up on that one for sure even with my limited experiance.

Bob Lazar is a good man and is just trying to make an honest living.

You would take even that away from him? What kind of world have we created for Gods sake.

:D

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/pixel.gif

Doc Nickel
09-13-2006, 09:11 PM
When they seized his computers there is no doubt that every single name in them was extracted and put in a database of people that have dealt with him regardless of what they bought. They aren't going to sort through the list and remove people. The government never works that way. Once you get on any sort of list like that it can have unforseen consequences such as denial of a security clearance in the future.

-Boy, you are a conspiracy theorist, aren't you?

Wow, buying a coffee cup from an online vendor of questionable sanity might hinder my efforts to get hired on at Langley? Horsesh*t. Anyone who applies to anything needing of a security clearance already gets a third-degree background check. And the more sensitive the position, the more thorough the check.

They'd find the purchase through your credit card statements long before they'd find your name already in some sinister government database.

And might I point out that, if you're the type buying explosives materials or gunpowder makin's online, you're probably not the type to be looking for a job that needs any sort of security clearance anyway.

Ever been in the military? They have FAR more information on you already than any crediut card statement to United Nuclear will ever give them. Hell, if you've ever bought a house or financed a car you're already in hundreds of government databases. Got a social security card? Ditto- they know everything they need to know 'bout 'cha.

Okay, so you bought two grams of uranium from this guy, then the feds seized the records. Know what they're gonna do? IF they think you're a better target than anyone else on the list, they're gonna subpoena (or whatever the proper term is) your bank/credit card records. They're gonna look on there for more bits and parts, see if you're cooking something up.

And what will they find? 15 gallons of gas at the Shell station, a "Far Side" book from Borders, a pair of shoes from Payless, $96 in groceries from "Piggly Wiggly", dinner at Applebees and your $32 phone bill paid online.

Then they'll check your phone records: Aunt Martha in Maine, the daughter off at college (four times) the auto-parts store and three neighbors, none of which lasted longer than two minutes.

At that point they'll forget about you and move on to the next name on UN's list.

Intrusive and violates your privacy? Hell, the three credit reporting agencies do almost that same thing to you about once a week.

Know what that means? You're already ON a list. You're on hundreds of lists and thousands of databases. But most of those databases have tens of thousands to millions of names.

Know what? The government isn't evil. Yes, the people in the government have, at times, done bad things, but the government itself is not evil. Just being "on a list" somewhere doesn't automatically mean there's a van with a shotgun mike and an infrared camcorder parked across the street and that your phone's been tapped.

Occasionally I get sick of this "Shhh! They're listening!" sh*t, you know?

Doc.

Evan
09-13-2006, 09:29 PM
Ever been in the military? They have FAR more information on you already than any crediut card statement to United Nuclear will ever give them. Hell, if you've ever bought a house or financed a car you're already in hundreds of government databases. Got a social security card? Ditto- they know everything they need to know 'bout 'cha.

Yes. Among other things I used to drive nukes around. I had a clearance. They sent people to speak with my family and even a couple of friends.

They will flag you because they don't know what other dealings you may have had with somebody they don't like. You would be very surprised what can cause a black mark on your record. Security clearances for instance can take six months to a year to complete. If anything shows up as a negative it can kill your chances of getting a clearance.

Mcgyver
09-13-2006, 09:41 PM
wouldn't a conspiracy theory type be pro lazars? after googling a bit about him, his continued existence would tend to cast doubt on the conspiracy theorists, after all if the whistle blower on area 51 and who continues to pi$$ off the gov hasn't been 'eliminated', it suggest gov is pretty innocuous :)

Evan
09-13-2006, 09:48 PM
Are you kidding? In that respect they love him. There is nothing better than a whack job like him to distract attention from the real stuff they do. Plus they get it for free and really don't have any involvement in the disinformation campaign.

Incidentally Doc, the NSA has nothing to do with security or collecting information on citizens. That's the job of the FBI and other agencies.

Todd Tolhurst
09-13-2006, 09:55 PM
Incidentally Doc, the NSA has nothing to do with security or collecting information on citizens. That's the job of the FBI and other agencies.

Perhaps that was once true. Not so much anymore.
Linky (http://www.forbes.com/home/intelligentinfrastructure/2006/08/17/NSA-wiretap-spying_cx_df_0817nsa.html).

Evan
09-14-2006, 01:35 AM
That sort of interception has been going on for much longer than a few years. That's the Echelon system. It monitors all communications traffic that crosses the borders of the US including internet and telephone. It isn't specifically aimed at US citizens. The NSA isn't allowed to specifically spy on citizens within the country such as placing a tap or intercepting internal communications. While it may seem an impossible task to monitor all international traffic I wouldn't discount the possibility. The NSA is the largest single employer of mathematicians and computer scientists in the world. They don't buy supercomputers, they build their own. All of the fiber optic cables to Europe for instance land in one place, in New York City. That makes the task of forwarding duplicate data packets to the NSA much easier.

As I said, internal monitoring is the job of the FBI and other agencies such as BATF. For monitoring internal traffic the FBI has a system called Carnivore which can be hooked to any digital system such as your local ISP and intercept all traffic to specific addresses.

[edit]

Incidentally, I also have a Canadian protected information level clearance.

Todd Tolhurst
09-14-2006, 08:56 AM
Sorry, I should have been clearer which part of the article I was referring to:


Meanwhile, a separate case still looms against AT&T (nyse: T - news - people ), the largest U.S. telecommunications company. In January 2006, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a privacy watchdog group, sued AT&T, arguing that it illegally gave customer records to the NSA without a court order.

This isn't Echelon, and it is aimed at domestic communications.


Incidentally, I also have a Canadian protected information level clearance.

OK... (???)

John Stevenson
09-14-2006, 09:12 AM
Incidentally, I also have a Canadian protected information level clearance.

Wow !!!

I'll raise you a guide dog for the blind, a copy of Windows 2007 written by Jimmy Hoffa and see you .
..

Evan
09-14-2006, 09:29 AM
I used to service equipment at the SOSUS submarine monitoring station at CFB Esquimalt as well as the RCMP and on destroyers during the height of the cold war. The reason for the clearance is I was fixing copiers. At one point during the cold war quite a few Xerox techs worked part time for the CIA. Certain Xerox copiers had special high capacity microfilm cameras installed that snapped a photo of every document copied. It was disguised as an ordinary looking power supply.

When the film needed changing the "power supply" would fail and cause a problem requiring a service call. These units were quite widespread as they were installed in embassies and consulates of east block countries in many locations in North America and elsewhere.

John Stevenson
09-14-2006, 09:39 AM
Nothing new, our dishwasher has one, it's disguised as a non-stick remover.

.

Evan
09-14-2006, 09:46 AM
Stover's account of the operation is based in large part on interviews with
Ray Zoppoth, a retired mechanical engineer who had a key role in designing
the spy camera (Zoppoth was even issued a secret patent for the gadget).
The CIA and Xerox remain tight-lipped about the operation, but Stover
was able to confirm Zoppoth's story with others who worked on the
project.

The operation was a smashing success, and Stover writes that the Xerox
surveillance of the Soviets may have been just the tip of the iceberg.
"Judging by the number of parts ordered from Xerox, Zoppoth believes that
spy cameras may have been installed in photocopiers all over the world, to
keep an eye on U.S. allies as well as enemies."

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/pipermail/ukcrypto/1999-September/045061.html

HTRN
09-14-2006, 10:23 AM
If the law allows him to sell one microcurie max that is what he sells even though .1 would do just fine.

In other words, HE DID NOTHING WRONG. If he's allowed to sell 1 microcurie, but the feds don't like that, than change the goddamn regs! If there's one thing I hate it's the way alot of federal law enforcement plays the "moving line" game. "But he bought the legal max, which we find suspicious".:mad:


HTRN

Evan
09-14-2006, 10:53 AM
It is foolish of him to do that. The calibration of sources isn't that accurate. I worked for a company by the name of American Chemical and Nuclear a long time ago. My job was in quality control. That included calibrating rad meters of all sorts.

By buying sources at that limit he risks getting some that are slightly over the limit depending on whose gear is used to test it. Not wise when you are dealing with people that don't like you. He goes out of his way to thumb his nose at them. Also not wise when dealing with people that are paid to hold a grudge.