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QSIMDO
10-19-2006, 09:32 AM
While reasonably mechanically adept I know nothing about this old (or any) dividing head.
I've been cleaning it up and recently removed the spiral machining drive assembly. (That forward cover for the gear mechanism is brass. Polish that right up!)
I don't need that spiral mechanism but apparently it has to stay.

Is there a general instruction manual available anywhere I could download showing operation/maintenance, etc. ?

TIA!



http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-10/1093172/indexer003.jpg

SGW
10-19-2006, 09:38 AM
Machinery's Handbook has quite a bit of information about using various dividing heads.

You may also want to look for information about either B&S or Cincinnati universal dividing heads, which would most likely be highly applicable to yours (which may be one of those). Some of the Lindsay Books reprints may cover that sort of thing.

QSIMDO
10-19-2006, 10:01 AM
Thank you!
I'm off to Amazon.

agrip
10-19-2006, 10:40 AM
The Hardinge site has something like a 50 page PDF that is an in-depth treatment of how to use a fully featured DH.

Some folks may require two (maybe 3) of the hivoltage caffiene energy drinks to wade through it.

I neglected to note the URL (dope slap)

Hth Ag

John Stevenson
10-19-2006, 11:09 AM
Looks like a Brown and Sharpe model DH.
Any of the generic books will do as they all follow the 40:1 standard.
There were some special, Cincinatti were one with their high number plates.
.

J Tiers
10-19-2006, 12:38 PM
Don't know that specific head, but that may not be specifically a spiral mechanism.

It looks more like a setup for differential indexing, where the plate is moved as well as the spindle drive, to achieve more division rations.

The shaft sticking out the back of it should be able to be geared to the spindle, using s set of gears and a "harp" that you don't have, but could make.

QSIMDO
10-19-2006, 01:42 PM
The shaft sticking out the back of it should be able to be geared to the spindle, using s set of gears and a "harp" that you don't have, but could make.


That shaft is in fact geared to the spindle by the gear train on this side under the guards.
There's a small, knurled hand wheel on the other side that drops the gears out of mesh. The shaft that the hand crank is on drops down as it's mounted on an eccentric, but if you turn the crank while the gears are out of mesh the chuck still moves.
Also on the other side is a lever that actuates a pin to positively index the back plate and another lever to lock everything solid.

I just ordered Machinery's and still chuckling over Lindsay's site. What a pip!

JeffG
10-19-2006, 01:46 PM
I have what appears to be an identical head. If you find a manual or part list please let me know. I can't find a maker's name on it anywhere, so it may be a "clone". Anyone have a genuine B&S and if so, how is it marked?

Most of the older machine shop books I've seen have a chapter or two on dividing heads - Moltrecht for example. Its a pretty straightforward process once you get used to it. I think the original dividing head set came with 3 plates - I recently picked up a new set of semi-finished plates and have put them on the "to do" list.

Jeff

CCWKen
10-19-2006, 01:54 PM
I don't need that spiral mechanism but apparently it has to stay.

Oh yeah, that equipment will be totally useless for you. Big, clunky and all dirty. Better box that up and send it to me! :D

agrip
10-19-2006, 02:16 PM
Earlier I said the Hardinge site - - ERROR ERROR, Will Robinson

THIS is the URL of the old Hardinge dividing head manual.

Sizeable PDF alert.

http://www.bbssystem.com/manuals/Dividinghead.pdf

Hth Ag

J Tiers
10-19-2006, 04:23 PM
That shaft is in fact geared to the spindle by the gear train on this side under the guards.


Well, the only guards I can see are on teh side with the crank.....

I mean geared to the chuck spindle on the back side, like a change gear lathe.... that's what I'd expect...

The stub sticking out to left in the pic would be geared to the spindle with change gears, allowing you to adjust the amount the plate turns per spindle turn.

John Stevenson
10-19-2006, 04:55 PM
JT is correct.
It's both a differential indexing dividing head and it also has the facilities for doing spiral work like drill flutes and helical gears.

These heads have four distinctive uses.
[1] Direct indexing by means of the plate behind the chuck. These usually have 24 holes for doing things like squares, hexagons, spanner flats etc, quick and simple. To use this facility you need to disengage the worm from the wheel by a lever not shown on the other side.

[2] Plain dividing where the worm and wheel are in mesh and are driven by the index plunger which can use any of the 18 hole combinations on 3 interchangeable plates.

[3] Differential indexing where you move the index by a set amount and also move the plate a different amount on another circle.
This is for divisions that can't be obtained on the standard plates, 127 is a classic example.

[4] Spiral Indexing where the table is geared to the DH so as the table moves the DH moves round.
Most have a book with gear ratio's and what are called lead tables that give you the rotation per inch of bed movement.

.

The round plunger at the top rear of the division plate holds the plate in a fixed position for normal dividing

QSIMDO
10-19-2006, 05:57 PM
Well, the only guards I can see are on teh side with the crank.....

I mean geared to the chuck spindle on the back side, like a change gear lathe.... that's what I'd expect...

The stub sticking out to left in the pic would be geared to the spindle with change gears, allowing you to adjust the amount the plate turns per spindle turn.

Ahhh, I get it now, thank you!

QSIMDO
10-19-2006, 06:04 PM
JT is correct.
It's both a differential indexing dividing head and it also has the facilities for doing spiral work like drill flutes and helical gears.

These heads have four distinctive uses.
[1] Direct indexing by means of the plate behind the chuck. These usually have 24 holes for doing things like squares, hexagons, spanner flats etc, quick and simple. To use this facility you need to disengage the worm from the wheel by a lever not shown on the other side.

[2] Plain dividing where the worm and wheel are in mesh and are driven by the index plunger which can use any of the 18 hole combinations on 3 interchangeable plates.

[3] Differential indexing where you move the index by a set amount and also move the plate a different amount on another circle.
This is for divisions that can't be obtained on the standard plates, 127 is a classic example.

[4] Spiral Indexing where the table is geared to the DH so as the table moves the DH moves round.
Most have a book with gear ratio's and what are called lead tables that give you the rotation per inch of bed movement.

.

The round plunger at the top rear of the division plate holds the plate in a fixed position for normal dividing


And thank you Sir John!
I'm trying to print that off right now but I just upgraded to IE7 and I can't find a damn thing on this page!

lane
10-19-2006, 09:14 PM
Thats a keeper A Brown an Sharp universal Dividing head .the ather parts gear train and such let you index using differential indexing plus spiral milling Boy I would give my little finger for one. I have one that willdospiral millimg but it wont differential index. Find an AUDELS MACHINIST hand book it goes into great depth on the use of that dividing head . Again GREAT FIND