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JimDobson
10-27-2006, 12:15 AM
Can people share some plans and/or ideas for some simple projects suitable for a small lathe and milling machine? Small steam or air driven engines, tooling.....actually anything.

dp
10-27-2006, 12:25 AM
Favorite sites with projects:
http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/index.html
http://www.davehylands.com/index.html
http://home.earthlink.net/~bazillion/intro.html
http://www.homepages.mcb.net/howe/index.htm

http://www.hotspotshawaii.com/irhpages/irhlive.html - ok, nothing to build here, but nice music. I supply his hi-speed audio feed from one of my servers.

Gotta be something there to keep you busy.

sidegrinder
10-27-2006, 12:50 AM
Here are a couple of "quickies" that come in handy. (It's a nice feeling to use tooling that you've actually made yourself!) The magnetic indicator base is made from aluminum and a few surplus magnets. The round dealy is a "speed" wrench for a milling vice to avoid using the cumbersome stock wrench for all but the final cinching. It is made from aluminum with ball-milled grooves for grip and a socket pressed in for the drive. The bullnose center is just something I wanted to make, haven't used it yet ;) Have fun! Sidegrinder.
http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/simpleproj001.jpg
http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/simpleproj002.jpg

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 02:18 AM
Favorite sites with projects:
http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/index.html
http://www.davehylands.com/index.html
http://home.earthlink.net/~bazillion/intro.html
http://www.homepages.mcb.net/howe/index.htm

http://www.hotspotshawaii.com/irhpages/irhlive.html - ok, nothing to build here, but nice music. I supply his hi-speed audio feed from one of my servers.

Gotta be something there to keep you busy.

Good links, thanks :)

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 02:20 AM
Here are a couple of "quickies" that come in handy. (It's a nice feeling to use tooling that you've actually made yourself!) The magnetic indicator base is made from aluminum and a few surplus magnets. The round dealy is a "speed" wrench for a milling vice to avoid using the cumbersome stock wrench for all but the final cinching. It is made from aluminum with ball-milled grooves for grip and a socket pressed in for the drive. The bullnose center is just something I wanted to make, haven't used it yet ;) Have fun! Sidegrinder.
http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/simpleproj001.jpg
http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/simpleproj002.jpg

Very nice photos! (is there a nicer look than machined steel on a well used wooden work bench?) some great ideas there. Again thank :)

Your Old Dog
10-27-2006, 07:23 AM
Frank Ford, you're just a couple of pages away from being able to do your own tips book! Nice site and great tips.

Thanks Jim for reminding me to look at Franks site. Seems he added quite a bit to it since my last visit :D

JCHannum
10-27-2006, 10:50 AM
Asking that question here is kind of like walking into a five star restaurant and asking for directions to a McDonald's.

The host, Village Press, publishes three fine magazines, Home Shop Machinist, Machinist's Workshop and Live Steam that feature all kinds of plans as well as tips and advertisers to source parts and materials. They are also adding a new magazine, The Digital Machinist for those so inclined.

If the mags are not sufficient, they also offer an excellent selection of books of projects and plans.

IOWOLF
10-27-2006, 11:06 AM
OOOh, ouch!


True JC, but wow, Nicely put.

Tin Falcon
10-27-2006, 04:11 PM
Jim:
As JC put so elequently. Villiage press does have an excelent selection of fine books for sale. They are assembled articles from the magazines. Steam and stirling book 1 is a good place to start if you want to build engines. Also the new rudy Kouhoupt books are out now. Many of the books have shop projects
I posted photos of my engines a while back http://www.homeshopmachinist.net/bbs/showthread.php?t=19188&highlight=Tin+Falcon

Also mentioned this book that may be of interest.

http://www.homeshopmachinist.net/bbs/showthread.php?t=20270&highlight=Tin+Falcon


JC: I notice Mr. Dobson is from "Down under" so may not be familiar with the HSM magazine and other products from Villiage press. I am sure he appreciated the "Education"
Regards
Tin Falcon

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 05:04 PM
Asking that question here is kind of like walking into a five star restaurant and asking for directions to a McDonald's.




Thats your point of view and of course your entitled to it. Mine differs.

I live in rural Australia and those magazines and books you mention sound terrific and I would dearly like to read them, but there just not available where I live and I would say that subscriptions to the magazines and purchase of the books in AUD$ would be prohibitively expensive.

As to my original question "Can people share some plans and/or ideas for some simple projects suitable for a small lathe and milling machine? Small steam or air driven engines, tooling.....actually anything."

I just don't see how the analogy of "Asking that question here is kind of like walking into a five star restaurant and asking for directions to a McDonald's" comes into play, but again thats your prerogative.

The second person to reply, replied with terrific links that are of peoples websites and showcase what they have made and or making. The third replier posted pics and showcased the wonderful tooling that he has made. Both those posters have given me many ideas and I'm thankful for their contribution to the thread.

Not every person who has a plan or and idea or has made something is a published author featured in a glossy magazine.

Tin Falcon
10-27-2006, 05:14 PM
Jim:
here is a good site
http://npmccabe.tripod.com/steam.htm
Tin

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 05:23 PM
Jim:
here is a good site
http://npmccabe.tripod.com/steam.htm
Tin


Tin, thanks for that link. I have only just quickly looked through it, but thats exactly the type of plans that I need -simple- !

Excellent link, thanks again.

JCHannum
10-27-2006, 05:49 PM
There is nothing wrong with asking for information, nor is there anything wrong with reminding people who is paying the heat and electric bills here.

Many people visit this website and do not participate. When responding in a thread, one must keep in mind that many more people are involved than just the original questioner. It may be surprising, but there are visitors who do not know what Village Press does, or that the publications exist.

Village Press is making inroads in overseas distribution of their publications, and they may hopefully become more available in Australia as well.

I see that John Stevenson's wife carries some of the books in her eBay store. Perhaps some enterprising individuals in Australia and other countries where they are not readily available could profit by doing the same.

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 06:06 PM
It may be surprising, but there are visitors who do not know what Village Press does, or that the publications exist.




In all honesty, why would I ? I did a google search a few weeks ago for "Home Machinist Forum" and this website was just one of the hits received. I had a look through the posts and liked what I saw so I joined up. Whatever is behind this website I have no idea.

I mean this with absolutely no offense, but Village Press means nothing to me at all and your post was the first I had ever heard of them. I would tend that most people either stumble across this website through others links or from web searches. The why's and what fors on how it exists wouldn't matter to many.

JCHannum
10-27-2006, 06:23 PM
Jim, that is precisely the reason for my post, not to put you or anyone else down.

The folks at Village Press do little more than host the forum. They never intrude with advertising or pushing their products as they have every right to do.

I only learned of the newest magazine in their lineup, "The Digital Machinist" when I received a subscription form for it last week by mail.

By the way, welcome to the board. We look forward to hearing from you and seeing some of your completed projects.

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 07:13 PM
Thanks for the welcome Jim.

Its a really great website and jam packed full of nice people, I'm glad I know the background behind it now. Its very rare these days to see such a clean website (virtually free of adverts) I have read so much on here using the search feature. Its a great resource for a beginner machinist such as myself. Thank you to the people who provide it and make it available.

IOWOLF
10-27-2006, 07:31 PM
"Not every person who has a plan or and idea or has made something is a published author featured in a glossy magazine."


True, but many of us have Imaginations,and some of us use ours.

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 07:44 PM
True, but many of us have Imaginations,and some of us use ours.

Good for you and thanks for sharing.

Your Old Dog
10-27-2006, 08:47 PM
Jim,
You might want to go thru Frank Fords website. Frank works on guitars but he's a hell of a machinist. I did and it took the better part of an hour. Frank is one of the guys IOwolf might be talking about when he talks about imagination. I appreciate Frank sharing his fertile imagination with us. Like you, Mine evidentally ain't up to snuff. Franks site was one of the first ones listed on the first page.

Welcome to the forum. hope to see some of your efforts shortly. I'll have some modest ones to post once I can post to my website to host the images.

Ray............

JimDobson
10-27-2006, 09:11 PM
Ray,

I'm still working my way through Franks site http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/index.html
Its Saturday morning here and I have been sitting just looking at his website,its awesome.

I am new to metal machining. I have managed to do the improved compound modification for my 9x20 from the plans of John Pitkin and am happy the way that turned out (wasn't extremely accurate on my measurements though).

I have spent the last couple of weeks re-organizing my workshop around my new lathe and mill and am nearly finished and looking for some very simple beginners projects to make, especially in regards to tooling to build up what I have and I would dearly love to make my son a simple small air/steam engine.

The links provided have been terrific and I am grateful for them. Much appreciated.

JimDobson
10-28-2006, 12:20 AM
Dp,

Mate I had to thank you for this site !

http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html

Tin Falcon
10-28-2006, 06:23 AM
Jim D:
Well why didn't you say you were looking for ways of improving your 9 x 20 here are a couple of sights that may help.
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
and

http://www.bedair.org/9x20.html
IOWOLF:
Imagagination is a great thing. Several of my engines are of my own design. And I do not think any of my engines are made exactly to the print specs. But it helps to get some inspiration and a starting point. Thinking outside the box is great but it is very helpfull to learn what is in the box first.

Regards
Tin

outback
10-28-2006, 07:03 AM
These are items I have made.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/drawings/smallvise.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/drawings/quickchange.jpg


Here is the link to the drawings.
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/drawings/

My shop is actually in the USA. It is located outback of our home.
Jim

IOWOLF
10-28-2006, 07:49 AM
Jim D:
Well why didn't you say you were looking for ways of improving your 9 x 20 here are a couple of sights that may help.
http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Versions/Versions_9x20.htm
and

http://www.bedair.org/9x20.html
IOWOLF:
Imagagination is a great thing. Several of my engines are of my own design. And I do not think any of my engines are made exactly to the print specs. But it helps to get some inspiration and a starting point. Thinking outside the box is great but it is very helpfull to learn what is in the box first.

Regards
Tin

Yea, you are correct. Now he needs to go get the BOX. :)

BobWarfield
10-28-2006, 01:22 PM
Asking that question here is kind of like walking into a five star restaurant and asking for directions to a McDonald's.

Au contrare!

First, the five star restaurant is hosting a regular meeting of the Gastronomic Societe, and they know full well we will be discussion the fare at other establishments and that this is no slight of their own fine cuisine. They are, after all, afficianodos themselves.

Secondly, the gentleman requesting assistance has hardly asked for the cheapest, greasiest food in town. He is simply asking for good affordable fare, perhaps a list of some of the nearest bistros, and especially those that may not be so readily apparent or well known.

There can not be too many sources of inspiration in this hobby, and one would be remiss to limit one's self strictly to what is available from the Village Press, just as one would be remiss to avoid said Press.

For my part, here is my list of convenient bistros catering to our pasttime:

http://www.thewarfields.com/MT/CCResourcesInd.htm

Many projects out there, some with plans, some just pictures. Well worth a gander

Best,

BW

dp
10-28-2006, 02:14 PM
Au contrare!

First, the five star restaurant is hosting a regular meeting of the Gastronomic Societe, and they know full well we will be discussion the fare at other establishments and that this is no slight of their own fine cuisine. They are, after all, afficianodos themselves.
BW

I would just add that some of us are coming into this late in life, and like the Donner party we don't have time to tarry along the way because the final long dark winter is fast approaching. I made quite a good living as a writer for many years before the Internet came along so understand the value of researching printed media and long hours in libraries, but now days the Internet is my one good book, and Google is my table of contents, index, thesaurus, and glossary. My bookmarks represent the most dog eared pages of the finest book ever written, to complete the metaphor.

That said, my book shelves are bursting with dead tree reference material I'd never wish to be without. As a researcher/author turned computer geek and home machinist, I've long known that no single source of information is adequate no matter how well done.

Your Old Dog
10-28-2006, 08:49 PM
All this talk about food has got me hungry :D Maybe I'll eat a littles something before heading out to the shop to pirate someones idea.

JimDobson
10-29-2006, 03:14 AM
For my part, here is my list of convenient bistros catering to our pasttime:

http://www.thewarfields.com/MT/CCResourcesInd.htm

Many projects out there, some with plans, some just pictures. Well worth a gander

Best,

BW


Bob, can't thank you enough for that link to your links....there awesome !

Thanks mate

JimDobson
10-31-2006, 04:54 AM
Someone asked me to post something that I had made. Well this is the first real "something" that I did. I know its nothing to people who know their way around a lathe with their eyes closed. But to a late bloomer to metal working like myself, I was pretty damn happy when I managed to make this from a square lump of steel.

http://www.users.on.net/~JIMJEN/Picture%20686.jpg



http://www.users.on.net/~JIMJEN/Picture%20685.jpg


Its a compound tool mount improvement for the 9x20 Asian lathe and the design is by J.Pitkin.

OhModelMaker
11-01-2006, 11:44 AM
Not everyone subscribes but still likes to come here to post and read posts. Plus, there reaklly isn't a site that I know of that has real good machinist projects that also has a MB where we can all gather and discuss projects. I would say lighten up...but that is just my opinion.

pwilson1204
11-01-2006, 12:31 PM
Hello:

I agree some folks should lighten up. Some of the earlier replies could have, as our beloved barristers would call it, a "chilling effect", particularly on newbies. I think the "simple projects" question is really the "why invest in hundreds or thousands of dollars in machine tools" question. In other words, as a hobby (not a business or cost-benefit-justified-repairs endeavor), beyond the possible relaxation and pleasure of making things, what do you do with a home machine shop?

Several years ago, I had a rather complete Sherline miniature lathe and separate miniature vertical mill shop, and I made simple steam engines, including one a "reverse paradigm" deliberately too large for normal fixtures, and requiring "reverse engineering" (I realize incorrect semantics.), e.g., boring the cylinder on the mill because it would not fit the normal lathe chuck or face plate setup.

Recently, as I near "retirement" age, whatever that is, I have contemplated reentering the machinist hobby, this time with larger Grizzly (12/36) lathe and small mill. I have surfed the web interminably (including the referenced sites), scanned HSM and Machinist Workshop, attended Cabin Fever, and tracked this and other forums. Most of the projects I found are either tooling, fixtures, facilitating ideas, etc.; or model engines. What's missing, and what I think folks are avidly pursuing, is simple neat things to make, like the nutcracker designs. Many folks like me are not engineers and do not have the skills (imagination?) or desire to design. We need and want to defer to folks with the knowledge, skill, ability, and experience to properly plan and specify.

If you want to flame me, have a ball. But I think a ready source of simple machinist general use type projects would help draw folks into (or back into) the hobby.

Bet regards,



Pwilson1204

BillH
11-01-2006, 12:37 PM
Guys, I am working on a Live steam locomotive that will run on Gauge 1 or G scale track, even O gauge as well. Only problem is that my laptop hit the wall with solidworks, Im at the point where I am designing the Stephenson valve gear. I'll try to finish it up. Maybe I could post drawings for the frame and wheels for now.

dp
11-01-2006, 04:37 PM
... Most of the projects I found are either tooling, fixtures, facilitating ideas, etc.; or model engines. What's missing, and what I think folks are avidly pursuing, is simple neat things to make, like the nutcracker designs. Many folks like me are not engineers and do not have the skills (imagination?) or desire to design. We need and want to defer to folks with the knowledge, skill, ability, and experience to properly plan and specify.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Tail

This explains quite a bit about what the market dynamic is regarding content vs interest. It is also somewhat esoteric, but endeavors to explain that the demand for non-mainstream products exceeds the demand for mainstream products that vendors focus on providing. A magazine publisher being one such vendor.

The trick is bringing the interested parties to the great diversity of products out there with little effort, and for now we have search engines and word of mouth. There is certainly no shortage of diversity in this hobby, and the scope of interest is equally vast.

This in no way disparages the magazine vendor - it simply exposes the basic fact that regardless of the quality of their publication, they do not nor can they reach all niche markets.

JCHannum
11-01-2006, 05:19 PM
I question some of the responses, as it seems they are not at all familiar with the magazines. I would suggest anybody interested in getting a start in the hobby to avail themselves of at least one copy of each magazine. They are readily available at most large bookstores and magazine dealers. Borders and Barnes and Noble will usually have them.

They have a wide range of articles and tips, not just engines and fixtures. FWIW, the original nutcracker seen on many sites was from an article by Rudy Kouhoupt in Home Shop Machinist.

The irony is that every time something is written up that does not meet some people's concept of what constitutes a HSM project, the criticism is loud and long. There were some very good articles for the beginning machinist several years ago. Unfortunately some of the projects were candlesticks, place card holders and crochet needles, and let's not forget the lawn edger. All were excellent articles in their own right and had lots of information on machining. They just did not meet some of the readers criterion as to what belongs in the magazine.

Jim, thanks for showing your project, nice job. It is very satisfying to be able to start with a odd shaped chunk of metal and manufacture something useful out of it.