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m_kilde
10-30-2006, 02:17 PM
Hi All

In Denmark we often use steel bar for lathe work, this we call "Automat stål" and directly translated to English it would be "Automat Steel"

The material in alloyed with either with sulphur or lead to increase its ability to turning

If my nonses give any meaning to you, :o could you please tell me what this bar material is called in english

ptjw7uk
10-30-2006, 02:23 PM
I think in England its called free machining steel although I dont think its a good structural grade
Peter

Mike Burdick
10-30-2006, 02:32 PM
Here's a link to some of the free machining steels and their properties....

http://www.niagaralasalle.com/products/index.html

m_kilde
10-30-2006, 02:44 PM
Thankyou guys

Reading the info on niagalasalle convinced me that the name must be
"free machining steel"

Thanks again !

pcarpenter
10-30-2006, 02:53 PM
"free machining steel" is to the best of my knowledge used to refer more generally to steel that machines well.

12L14 is a specific alloy that contains lead to make it machine nicely and as such would commonly be referred to as free machining as a characteristic. However, more specifically, it is referred to as leaded steel one trade name for which is called Ledaloy (sp?) as I recall. I would suppose you could arrive at free machining steel of other alloys as well.

Edit-- If I wanted to buy some of this or search for it, I would ask for 12L14.

paul

Evan
10-30-2006, 03:06 PM
I think the reason for the name "Automat stål" is because leaded steel is often used in automatic screw machines and similar machines. It just means cold drawn leaded steel bar stock.

motorworks
10-30-2006, 07:40 PM
Hi
C1144 stressproof has very close machining properties, less the lead.
Also has higher strength.

"Stressproof® is a medium carbon free machining steel that has been severely cold reduced to improve its mechanical properties. Its inherent strength, without heat treatment, is comparable to heat treated steels of equal hardness. This permits direct use of many parts following the last machining operation, without the necessity of a further hardening treatment.

Machinability is rated at 83% of B1112, 50 to 100% faster than carbon or alloy steels of equivalent hardness."

lane
10-30-2006, 07:47 PM
12L14 or 1215 or 303 ss 0R 1144 -stressproof

John Stevenson
10-30-2006, 07:53 PM
12L14 or 1215 or 303 ss 0R 1144 -stressproof

No that's American.
In English it's free cutting, EN1A, 220M07
or DIN 9521 as m_kilde is in Denmark.

.

J Tiers
10-30-2006, 11:22 PM
And, as we are now post July 2006, he will most likely NOT be able to legally get any leaded steel..... it will have to be sulphured.

RoHS legislation in teh EC prohibits most leaded anything........ steel, solder, etc. We have to prove that every "separable" part of our product is free of lead and some other materials. That means any part you can disassemble to.

There is a percent limit, but it isn't very much.


Oh, and the RoHS rules will INCREASE, not decrease the trash rate for electronics.... the tin solder has known failure mechanisms, and once failed due to whiskering, etc, , the equipment is essentially non-repairable.

The FAA will NOT allow avionics to be made with non-lead solder. There is (was?) an airworthiness bulletin on it.

And, the laws are coming here too, never mind that all your new soon-to-break-forever computers are already RoHS compliant.... Buy a new computer, you better get your use out of it inside 2 or 3 years tops..... it's going down hard after that, most likely.

OK, rant off.

rkepler
10-30-2006, 11:38 PM
The generic term you guys are reaching for are "screw machine steels" (tying back nicely to the original "automatic steel"). Originally AISI 11xx spec it now includes all free machining steels which include leaded steels as well as resulphurized alloy and stainless steels. I've made stuff from a leaded 4140, turns great, but still not as nice as 12L14.

LaSalle StressProof is made from 1144, but not all 1144 is StressProof. Both turn pretty nicely.

I got some 1018 the other day that mills like pink gun eraser. Nothing I did would give better than a half-ass finish. I think that all the scrap and remelt stuff is getting trace copper in the steels anymore, stuff is likely coming in with max amounts of traces.

Evan
10-31-2006, 01:23 AM
JT,

I was reading about those regulations recently and there is a loophole in the EU that you can drive a truckload of leaded steel through. There is a certain percentage limit and if the product you are making has no further lead added in the manufacturing process you may use products that do contain lead below that percentage limit.

Here is the list of exemptions:



The Annex to the Directive lists a limited number of applications of lead, mercury, cadmium and hexavalent chromium, which are exempted from the requirements of Article 4(1). Despite the use of the word ‘Exemption’ products built using the following exemptions are RoHS compliant:

Mercury in compact fluorescent lamps not exceeding 5 mg per lamp.
Mercury in straight fluorescent lamps for general purposes not exceeding:
- halophosphate 10 mg
- triphosphate with normal lifetime 5 mg
- triphosphate with long lifetime 8 mg.
Mercury in straight fluorescent lamps for special purposes.
Mercury in other lamps not specifically mentioned in this Annex.
Lead in glass of cathode ray tubes, electronic components and fluorescent tubes.
Lead as an alloying element in steel containing up to 0,35 %lead by weight, aluminium containing up to 0,4 %lead by weight and as a copper alloy containing up to 4 %lead by weight.
Lead in high melting temperature type solders (i.e. tin-lead solder alloys containing more than 85 %lead),
- lead in solders for servers, storage and storage array systems (exemption granted until 2010),
- lead in solders for network infrastructure equipment for switching, signalling, transmission as well as network management for telecommunication,
- lead in electronic ceramic parts (e.g.piezoelectronic devices).
Cadmium plating except for applications banned under Directive 91/338/EEC (1)amending Directive 76/769/EEC (2) relating to restrictions on the marketing and use of certain dangerous substances and preparations.
Hexavalent chromium as an anti-corrosion of the carbon steel cooling system in absorption refrigerators.
Within the procedure referred to in Article 7(2),the Commission shall evaluate the applications for:
- Deca BDE,
- mercury in straight fluorescent lamps for special purposes,
- lead in solders for servers, storage and storage array systems, network infrastructure equipment for switching, signalling, transmission as well as network management for telecommunications (with a view to setting a specific time limit for this exemption),and
- light bulbs
http://www.adax.com/products/rohs_weee/rohs_weee.htm

Millman
10-31-2006, 01:28 AM
JT,

I was reading about those regulations recently and there is a loophole in the EU that you can drive a truckload of leaded steel through. There is a certain percentage limit and if the product you are making has no further lead added in the manufacturing process you may use products that do contain lead below that percentage limit.

Here is the list of exemptions:


http://www.adax.com/products/rohs_weee/rohs_weee.htm

You're still insane.

Evan
10-31-2006, 01:36 AM
Insanity is like fine wine, the more it ages the better it gets.

Millman
10-31-2006, 02:17 AM
[[the more it ages the better it gets.]] Does not apply in your particular case.

Evan
10-31-2006, 08:24 AM
It appears you may be well equipped to judge such matters from personal experience. I defer to your seniority in the field.

J Tiers
11-03-2006, 08:27 AM
For some reason, our compliance folks don't want to use some of the exemptions....... I think they are aware of pending considerations to clamp down even farther in certain areas.