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Magee
11-01-2006, 09:58 AM
Hello, all...
Been lurking here off and on for a year or so while i've been trying to aquire and set up a little shop for myself. After years in different apartments, the little lady and I decided we should start house hunting (actually, I was shop hunting... the little lady was house hunting:D). We managed to find a suitable shop (er, house), and I'm almost ready to start shopping for machines.
I've been digging through Craigslist, eBay, the local print stuff, machine dealers, etc and have the usual questions about new import vs used domestic stuff (I'll spare the dead horse the beating for now)....

I did come across a used Cadillac lathe, that looked interesting, though and I couldn't find too much info about them... It's a bit more than I'd like to spend, so unless this thing is a real gem, I'll likely pass it up. I am curious, nonetheless.

I know they're still available through Webb Machine:
http://www.webbmachinery.com/Cadillac/cadillac_engine_lathes.htm

but, I'm not quite sure what relevance that has to the particular machine I saw...
I've heard the machines used to be built in Detroit, also heard France, Taiwan, Oz, etc. Looks to me like they're currently Asian imports, but I'm wondering if anyone here knows a little more about their history...

Here's some more info about the machine in particular:

http://inv.camachinery.com/machpict/001307/1018.jpg

SPECIFICATIONS::

CAPACITY:
SWING OVER BED & CARRIAGE WAYS.............14"
SWING THROUGH GAP...........................................15-1/2"
SWING OVER CROSS SLIDE..................................8"
DISTANCE BETWEEN CENTER.............................22"

HEADSTOCK:
SPINDLE SPEEDS NUMBER....................................6
SPINDLE SPEED RANGES..............................83 - 1800 RPM
SPINDLE NOSE............................................A1-6
SPINDLE SIZE OF HOLE...........................................1-3/4"

CARRIAGE & COMPOUND:
COMPOUND REST TOP SLIDE TRAVEL 4" CROSS SLIDE TRAVEL 8.5"

FEEDS-THREADS:
INCH THREADS 4 - 56 TPI

MACHINE EQUIPPED WITH:
ALORIS TOOL POST 3-POINT 3-1/2" STEADY REST
3-JAW CHUCK 4-JAW CHUCK
TRAV-A-DIAL LIVE CENTER
5-C LEVER COLLET CLOSER COOLANT
MIC. CARRIAGE STOP THD. CHASING DIAL
HARDENED & GROUND BED WAYS
ELECTRIC: 220/440/3/60
WEIGHT: APPROX. 3100 LBS.

SGW
11-01-2006, 10:50 AM
I'm not sure what may be happening now, but the story I heard is that the original "Cadillac" lathe company was started by a disgruntled offshoot of the Monarch lathe co. They were really fine lathes, comparable to the Monarch.

The one you show in the picture looks newer than that though, and I wouldn't be surprised if it was an import. But it looks like it's a very solid and well-made machine (as much as one can tell from a picture).

DR
11-01-2006, 11:20 AM
The newer Cadillac lathes as pictured, I believe, are clones of Mori Seiki's. Webb Machinery was the importer/dealer, maybe still is.

Webb is one of the better importers to deal with.

Ian B
11-01-2006, 11:23 AM
Nice looking lathe, but I wonder what was in the designer's mind when he put the saddle handwheel as far to the left as he possibly could - right where hot chips fall on your hands.

Ian

Mark Hockett
11-01-2006, 11:26 AM
Magee,
I have a friend who owns two of those Cadillac lathes. Both were sold originally with CNC control over twenty years ago. He has a shop and the machines run almost every day. The machines are still producing accurate parts today even with the older CNC control.
They are very good lathes and If the price is not out of your reach I would think about it.

DR
11-01-2006, 11:30 AM
Nice looking lathe, but I wonder what was in the designer's mind when he put the saddle handwheel as far to the left as he possibly could - right where hot chips fall on your hands.

Ian


There's supposed to be a chip shield mounted over the hand wheel for this very reason.

pcarpenter
11-01-2006, 11:31 AM
Ian-- welcome to one of the apparently common differences between lathes for UK use vs. US use. That position pictured is too common on lathes over here. From what I read while investigating some of the Colchester models at lathes.co.uk, they even made the same model lathe with the handwheel in two positions depending on where the lathe was going.

Do I wish my handwheel was in the British "standard position"? You bet....the hot chips are really annoying and make me want to use the power feed more often.

Paul

dp
11-01-2006, 11:40 AM
Nice looking lathe, but I wonder what was in the designer's mind when he put the saddle handwheel as far to the left as he possibly could - right where hot chips fall on your hands.

Ian

Asians commonly wear gloves when they work. They don't always work. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4330333.stm

My wheel is similarly located and I also find I use the power feed more than I should. There's just not room on my little machine for guards.

CCWKen
11-01-2006, 02:39 PM
The weight alone tells a story. If it is a re-badged Mori Seiki, grab it and don't look back. Even if it isn't, it looks like a well built lathe.

pepe
11-01-2006, 07:41 PM
have run this lathe for about 30 years. it's a solid lathe with a smooth feel of caraige and cross slide. made in tiawan by yam mfg. the one pictured in your post is identical to mine with the exception of the qc gear box lever - mine is similar to that pictured in your link which makes me think the one you're interested in is probably a tad older (not necessarily a bad thing). my lathe and the one in the pic have an a-1 spindle nose, not d-1. good design on the collet chuck. it functions like a set tru. you can tram it dead true. takes a little more time than slapping in a sleeve, but after you do it a few times, you'll find it pretty easy and the accuracy is worth it. its a dependable machine with no major maintenance problems in all the years i've run mine in a job shop environment. the one in your picture apears clean and well maintained. a lot of extra value with the collett closer, aloris tool post, and steady rest too. as to the carriage hand wheel being on the left, it's funny how natural something can feel after you use it for a while. i also have a clausing with the hand wheel on the right, and when i have to use it, it really feels strange. i think you'll like this machine.

cheers - phil

Magee
11-02-2006, 08:44 AM
Thanks to all for the replies...
Any drawbacks (or advantages) to the A1 spindle... like chuck cost/availability? It does come with a 3 and 4-jaw that appear to be in good shape... just trying to consider all the angles.
Ah, decisions, decisions...

Would anyone care to venture a guess as to the value of this machine? I have no frame of reference as I didn't go looking for this in particular. I just kind of stumbled upon it.

He wants $4500, which is quite a bit more than I wanted to spend (I'm in the market for a mill also). I can potentially swing it (horrible pun intended), I just have no idea if this is close to what it's worth...
Thanks again.

SGW
11-02-2006, 08:58 AM
I notice you're in Boston. If you haven't, you might want to check out Brothers Machinery www.brothersmachinery.com in Andover, on rt. 495 as a source of used machinery.

As far as this lathe...IMO it would certainly be worth $4500. I can't say about relative merits of spindle nose tapers. If it comes with decent chucks and a faceplate, you shouldn't need much, if anything, else anyway.

JCHannum
11-02-2006, 10:17 AM
The lathe is worth $4500. It looks to be in very good condition and is well equipped. A1 is a good mounting system. It is not as convenient to change as most others, but is positive and accurate.

As an HSM machine, it may be a bit of overkill. The only drawback I see is the 22" between centers. That is on the short side for a 14" lathe.

Magee
11-02-2006, 10:32 AM
As an HSM machine, it may be a bit of overkill.

Agreed. :D


The only drawback I see is the 22" between centers. That is on the short side for a 14" lathe.

Very true as well.