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View Full Version : Poorman's tool bit grinder--PURISTS BEWARE!



sidegrinder
11-24-2006, 04:13 PM
Okay, someone asked about a toolbit in one of my photos, so I thought I'd introduce you all to the world's cheapest toolbit grinder. I got this 3 summers ago at a garage sale for 50cents. It would only spin if you helped get it started first. It is an old Monkey Wards model, probably around 40yrs old. First thing I did was take it all apart to clean and lube it. I made a small table with a slit on one side and put on a 6" cutting wheel. This works great for shortening rods/bolts and small bits of this and that as well as adding the occassional slit here and there. On the other end, I mounted a tilting vice and made a table with a slot and mitre gauge. I try and use this only for HSS toolbits and it has worked out well. (You can all stop laughing at any time:) ) I know that grinding on the side of the wheel like this is taboo, but I never really force the issue and this is a pretty low-powered setup anyway. (They don't call me Sidegrinder for nothin'!)
http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/grind002.jpg

http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k203/sidegrinder/grind004.jpg

Oh yeah, I almost forgot, notice how the clamped on thrift store light adds an air of Red Green to the whole setup. Gotta find my duct tape...

torker
11-24-2006, 06:56 PM
"Purists Beware"...I love it!
Homeshop innovation is what this place is all about....right?
Thanks for sharing!
Russ

Magic9r
11-24-2006, 07:05 PM
Flip that wheel & when you've used as much off the other side replace it.
Otherwise, if it works, it works,
Nick

Forrest Addy
11-24-2006, 07:10 PM
If it works don't knock it. Tell the purists and fault finders to go pi$$ up a rope.

John Stevenson
11-24-2006, 07:15 PM
If it works don't knock it. Tell the purists and fault finders to go pi$$ up a rope.

No need, just keep posting photo's and idea's let the purists sink into their armchairs.

.

Your Old Dog
11-24-2006, 11:09 PM
If it works don't knock it. Tell the purists and fault finders to go pi$$ up a rope.

Forrest I gotta know. You from around Western Pennsylvainia or Ohio line? That was my dad's phrase when ever someone got his goat. Ain't never heard anyone else use it except me!!

rantbot
11-25-2006, 01:51 AM
Forrest I gotta know. You from around Western Pennsylvainia or Ohio line? That was my dad's phrase when ever someone got his goat. Ain't never heard anyone else use it except me!!

Common among us cosmopolites in eastern MA too.

Forrest Addy
11-25-2006, 02:37 AM
Nope. Got it from a high school buddy's dad about 50 years ago. I chuckled for days.

Norman Atkinson
11-25-2006, 03:18 AM
Congratulations on the simplicity of it.

OK, I would change the abrasive wheel to a dished one- and for reasons of safety rather than anything else.

The only other modification would be to put the same gubbins at the other end but with a different grade of wheel.

So if you go into Model Engineering services on www.lawm.freeserve.co.uk
the Kennet grinder is pretty similar.

Does it work? Well, I have had one for years.

Cheers

Norm

C - ROSS
11-25-2006, 08:54 AM
I just have to agree with Forrest.

Oh yes we use that phrase around this part of the country also.

Ross

greywynd
11-25-2006, 02:21 PM
I don't know where the idea of grinding with the side of a wheel being bad came from, but we probably do as much side wheeling as normal grinding on our surface grinders at work. I was so used to it that at a training course at our communtiy college a few years back I started doing it for a project, even the instructor came over and watched, his background was machining rather than toolmaking, and hadn't seen sidewheeling take material off the way I was. I then redressed the wheel, and finished up the face I was grinding. When finished, I took the piece, handed it to him and asked if he would check it for square and flatness, he couldn't believe how close it was. We can grind seal-off surfaces in our moulds this way, .0002" clearance and they flash, which isn't allowable. (We're a net shape, flash free diecasting company.)

Mark

Norman Atkinson
11-25-2006, 02:56 PM
I cannot comment further than refer to Universal's strictures

' Side Grindiing should only be performed with wheels designed for the purpose

Grinding on the flat side of the wheels designed for peripheral grinding may be dangerous and cause wheel breakage. This does not preclude their use for applications such as shoulder and form grinding where it is recognised that a limited amount of side grinding is performed.

Extreme caution should be exercised not to use excessive pressure.'

I repeated the above observations in my earlier posting and I have no intentions of contravening UK safety regulations!



Norm

G.A. Ewen
11-25-2006, 05:40 PM
I love the vice idea. I will definitely steel this idea and add it to my grinder.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/GAEWEN/a5de8c7a.jpg

TECHSHOP
11-26-2006, 01:17 AM
greywynd:

I thought the danger from "sidegrinding" was that you could create a thin "web". This "thin band" on the wheel then would lack the "strength" to keep the outer edges "attached" when the wheel was "at speed".

YOD:

On this (the other) end of PeeAye I have often told/been told to use rope in such a way.

Norman Atkinson
11-26-2006, 03:21 AM
I think that when a leading wheel manufacturer and a Government Agency whose remit is safety in indudtrial applications comes out with regulations- and in the Unuted Kingdom enforceable by law, the matter only needs the equivalent authorities elsewhere to endorse the same views.

In an interesting world authority's view the recommended speed of a wheel of unknown provenance is NIL.

It is up to those who think that they know otherwise to add from where their authority- and not their opinion, is obtained.

Norman

Your Old Dog
11-26-2006, 05:20 AM
In an interesting world authority's view the recommended speed of a wheel of unknown provenance is NIL

I'd have to agree with that. In high school shop class they told us if you are in doubt as to the history of a wheel you toss it out. To this day all my wheels are babyed with respect to shock load of being dropped or hit. I worry about an unseen fracture. And "always" powerup while standing to the side. I suppose most everyone does that.

I think the big worry about using the side of the wheel is getting the front portion much thinner than the mid section and causeing the stresses set up by heat to be differant than the wheel was designed for.

Having said that, I use the side of mine all the time for dressing and sharpening as I don't feel I using up enough of the wheel to matter on such light cuts.

John Stevenson
11-26-2006, 06:50 AM
It's a pity no committee or world authority can define common sense.





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gizmo2
11-26-2006, 09:35 AM
SideG, I can still see some remnants of that Monkey Ward bluegreen paint hiding out in some of the corners. You just obviously haven't used this machine enough...